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DAA: David L. Miers

David L. Miers


Greensburg, IN


David Miers earned a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Economics from Purdue in 1970. He is currently president of Miers Farm Corporation in Decatur County, Indiana. Here are some of this thoughts on education, career, and life: On his Purdue heritage: “I was raised on family land in Decatur County. I was in 4-H and Junior Leaders. I always knew that I was going to Purdue-I never even thought of going anywhere else. And agriculture was always going to be my focus. “I was a triple legacy, twice. While at Purdue I was in Sigma Nu Fraternity, as my Granddad had been at the University of Illinois, and my Dad had been at Purdue. My Grandfather, my Father and myself were also all officers in the United States Army. My Grandfather was in World War I, my father in World War II, and I was in ROTC at Purdue and on active duty during the Vietnam years. On his Purdue experience: “Both of the organizations that I was in-a fraternity and the military--were out of vogue in the late 1960s. You had to have a lot of perseverance to stay in ROTC at that time because of the negativism toward the military, but I loved the military life. I also loved fraternity life, the great football and basketball teams, and going to the Rose Bowl. Those are my best Purdue memories. “At Purdue in the fraternity and ROTC and later in the Army I was developing organizational skills, respect, how to manage people and make decisions, and self confidence.” On the most influential person at Purdue: “By far and away, that would have to be Dean David Fendler. He had been my Dad’s counselor at Purdue, and he was mine. He was adamant that I stay in ROTC because he felt it was important that people gain military experience, and if you were going to be in you should be an officer. He also was a great influence in getting me interested in agriculture. He guided me into general agriculture, and was not pleased when I changed to Ag Economics.” On his business: My granddad and father farmed the same land I’m working now, about 1,800 acres. We grow and harvest seed corn and seed soybeans for Pioneer. Most of the time I’m working with the markets or in the office or attending seminars, or working to make our community and state a better place to live. The most rewarding part of my career is making our own farm operation more productive and efficient. Most of that is achieved by continuous contact with Purdue, the Extension Service and the School of Agriculture, listening to their advice. “Several years ago, for example, I had to make the decision whether to purchase a very expensive seed corn harvester. I called to Purdue and spoke to Howard Doester. W spent a lot of time on the phone discussing pros and cons, and from those conversations with him I was able to make a decision that has been very lucrative and worked out extremely well. “Another example: In 1991 we built a large farm shop and I sought out advice from Bruce McKenzie from Ag Engineering about how to construct the building, things I should and shouldn’t do, and working with him we’ve built a showroom shop, made all the right decisions for efficiency. “Another thing we use all the time is the results from the state about the different varieties of soybeans and corn and how they yield in different areas. We also work closely with the entomology department putting out bug traps and reporting back to them on a weekly basis during the growing season. So we’re taking data out and putting it back in.” On his proudest civic contribution: “I have been working with the Decatur County Community Foundation, distributing funds to community organizations. The grants we gave this year will help build a new YMCA, a county day care center and youth softball leagues. I think youth are our future and it’s important we do a good job educating and training them to take those responsibilities.” On his philosophy of life: First and foremost, don’t burn any bridges. Anyone you’re involved with your entire life, you never know when that person will come back or have some influence on you. And secondly, leave things better than when you started. In an organization, a farm, a business, you should leave it in a better place than when you started.” Highlights/David Miers Education BS, Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, 1970 Career 1970-72 First Lieutenant, United States Army 1972-present President, Miers Farm Corporation, Greensburg, Ind. Honors and Associations Union Bank and Trust Company, Board of Directors Decatur County Family YMCA, Board of Directors Greensburg Area Chamber of Commerce, Board of Directors Decatur County Agriculture Hall of Fame Sagamore of the Wabash Indiana Agricultural Leadership Development Program Purdue University Alumni Association, Board of Directors Purdue University Agricultural Alumni Association, Board of Directors Indiana Farm Management Association, Board of Directors Decatur County Cooperative Extension Board Indiana Deputy Commissioner of Agriculture Chairman, Indiana State Fair Commission Display quote/David Miers “The most rewarding part of my career is making our own farm operation more productive and efficient. Most of that is achieved by continuous contact with Purdue, the Extension Service and the School of Agriculture, listening to their advice. “Several years ago, for example, I had to make the decision whether to purchase a very expensive seed corn harvester. I called to Purdue and spoke to Howard Doester. W spent a lot of time on the phone discussing pros and cons, and from those conversations with him I was able to make a decision that has been very lucrative and worked out extremely well. “Another example: In 1991 we built a large farm shop and I sought out advice from Bruce McKenzie from Ag Engineering about how to construct the building, things I should and shouldn’t do, and working with him we’ve built a showroom shop, made all the right decisions for efficiency. “Another thing we use all the time is the results from the state about the different varieties of soybeans and corn and how they yield in different areas. We also work closely with the entomology department putting out bug traps and reporting to them on a weekly basis during the growing season. So we’re taking data out and putting it back in.”