Jeremy Marchant-Forde

 

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Background

I was raised in the predominantly rural county of Suffolk in the United Kingdom. Historically an important agricultural area, Suffolk has given the world the Suffolk Punch horse, the Red Poll cattle and the Suffolk sheep. Most of my early animal experiences however, were with pigs and chickens on my grandparents' small-holding.

On leaving high school, I attended the University of Bristol, originally studying veterinary science but instead graduating in 1990 with a B.Sc. (Hons) in Biochemistry. I then moved to the University of Cambridge, where I completed my Ph.D. in sow welfare in Prof. Don Broom's Animal Welfare and Human-Animal Interactions Group in 1994. I then stayed on at Cambridge as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate, working on a DEFRA-funded project investigating alternative housing systems for farrowing sows, in conjunction with ADAS Terrington, who at that time were still an executive agency of DEFRA. During the course of this project in 1996, I was awarded a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust Travelling Fellowship, which enabled me to visit 14 research institutes and universities across north central Europe that were engaged in research on farrowing systems.

In 1998, I moved to a faculty position as Senior Research Fellow with De Montfort University School of Agriculture, based at Caythorpe in Lincolnshire. During the summer of 1999, I spent 2 months at the University of British Columbia as a Distinguished Junior Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, which also enabled me to work with the Animal Welfare Program. In early 2001, I was also a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Animal Sciences at Purdue University. After transfer of the DMU School of Agriculture to the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lincoln in late 2001, I accepted a position as Research Animal Scientist with the USDA-ARS, Livestock Behavior Research Unit. I was made Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Animal Sciences in 2005. I am also the current President of the International Society for Applied Ethology.