College of Agriculture Core Graduation Requirements

The College of Agriculture core requirements go beyond and encapsulate the Purdue University Core requirements. These university requirements include quantitative reasoning, science, humanities, social and behavioral science, information literacy, written communication, oral communication, and science, technology, and society. By meeting College of Agriculture requirements, University Core requirements are automatically exceeded.

To earn a baccalaureate degree, a student shall complete resident study at Purdue University for at least two semesters and the enrollment in, and completion of, at least 32 semester credit hours of coursework required and approved for completion of the degree. These courses are expected to be at least junior-level courses.

The College of Agriculture faculty has established that a minimum of 120 semester credit hours must be completed to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture (B.S.L.A.) with the exception of the Agricultural Education Major (requires a minimun of 128 credits). A minimum of 124 credit hours must be completed to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry (B.S.F.). A minimum of 128 credit hours must be completed to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering (B.S.A.E.) or Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering (B.S.B.E.).

Minimum Core Graduation Requirements *

Academic Category B.S. B.S.A.E.  B.S.B.E. B.S.F. B.S.L.A.
  Semester Credits
College of Agriculture Orientation
AGR 10100 and Departmental Orientation

1

1†

1†

1

1

 
Mathematics and Sciences  

Biological Sciences

8

8

8

8

8

General Chemistry

6

8

8

6

0

Calculus

3

16

16

3

0

Statistics

3

0

0

3

3 

Additional Mathematics and/or Sciences

3-5

4-6

4-6

3-5

4-6

Minimum Total 

23

36

36

23

15

 
Science, Technology, and Society 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3
Written and Oral Communication

First Year Composition

3-4

3-4

3-4

3-4

3-4

Fundamental of Speech Communication

3

3

3

3

3

Additional Written and/or Oral Communication 

3

3

3

3

3

Minimum Total 

9

9

9

9

9

 
Social Sciences and Humanities  

Economics

3

3

3

3

3

University Core Humanities 3 3 3 3 3

Other Humanities and/or Social Sciences

6

6

6

6

9

Humanities or Social Sciences 30000+Level

3

3

3

3

3

Minimum Total 

15

15

15

15

18

 
Departmental Requirements and Electives

68

79

79 

72

74

           
Total Credits 

120

128

128

124

120

* Plans of study that lead to the Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, or Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture degrees must include a minimum of nine credits, or equivalent, of International Understanding electives, three credits of Multicultural Awareness electives, and an approved capstone course or experience. Plans of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Engineering or Biological Engineering must include a minimum six credits of International Understanding electives, three credits of Multicultural Awareness electives, and an approved capstone course or experience.

 Students in a Bachelor of Science degree program in Agricultural Engineering or Biological Engineering may fulfill the orientation requirement in ENGR 13100.

 Students enrolled in Landscape Architecture may substitute calculus for statistics.

Courses Not Applicable in Undergraduate Plans of Study

The following courses are not applicable as credit toward graduation in any College of Agriculture baccalaureate degree program: CHM 10000; ENGL 10000, 10900, 11100; ENGR 19100, 19200, 19300; MA 11100, 12300, 13300, 13400, 15100; 15555, PHYS 14900; STAT 11300, 11400; and all General Studies courses except GS 49000 - Discovery Park Undergraduate Research.

Credits earned in one of the following course - MA 15200, 15300, 15400 or MA 15800 - may be used as an unrestricted elective in the College of Agriculture undergraduate plans of study, but may not be used as a Mathematics and Sciences elective.

Pass/Not-Pass Grading Policy

A student classified as a sophomore or higher who has a minimum 2.0 graduation index may elect the pass/not-pass grading option. A maximum of 21 credits of elective courses under the pass/not-pass grading option can be used toward graduation requirements.

Core Requirements

CAPSTONE COURSE OR EXPERIENCE (0-3 CREDITS)

Baccalaureate degree plans of study must include a capstone course or experience. Capstone course credits also may be used to fulfill core curriculum requirements or departmental requirements or electives.

In a capstone experience, students will be challenged to integrate their accumulated knowledge, and technical and social skills in order to identify and solve a problem relevant to issues encountered by professionals in their chosen discipline, and to communicate the results of their efforts to their peers. In doing so, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to adapt to professional situations. It is hoped that this experience will stimulate students' appreciation of the need for lifelong learning and initiate professional and personal liaisons.

The College of Agriculture faculty has approved capstone courses and experiences which are integrated as part of each Agriculture major curriculum requirements. The list of courses includes:

  • (4) ABE 48500 (Agricultural and Biological Engineering Design)
  • (3) ABE 48600 (Agricultural Engineering Design)
  • (4) ABE 55600 (Biological and Food Process Design)
  • (4) AGEC 41100 (Farm Management)
  • (3) AGEC 42700 (Advanced Agribusiness Marketing)
  • (3) AGEC 43000 (Agricultural and Food Business Strategy)
  • (4) AGEC 43100 (Advanced Agri-Sales and Marketing)
  • (1-6) AGEC 49900 (Thesis)
  • (3) AGRY 48500 (Precision Crop Management) 
  • (1) AGRY 49800 (Agronomy Senior Seminar) and (3) AGRY 58500 (Soils and Land Use)
  • (1) AGRY 49800 (Agronomy Senior Seminar) and (3) AGRY 51200 (Integrated Turfgrass Systems)
  • (1) AGRY 49800 (Agronomy Senior Seminar) and (1-3) pre-approved faculty supervised research, an Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) project, or an industry or government internship.
  • (1) ANSC 48100 (Contemporary Issues in Animal Sciences) and one production/management course selected from ANSC 44000, ANSC 44100, ANSC 44200, ANSC 44300, ANSC 44400, ANSC 44500, or ANSC 44600
  • (2) ASEC 34100 (Curriculum Development in Agricultural Education)
  • (3) ASEC 48000 (Agricultural Communication Capstone Seminar)
  • (3) ASM 49500 (Agricultural Systems Management)
  • Three credits earned by completion of BCHM 49800 (Research in Biochemistry) or BCHM 49801 (Head Start to Biochemistry Research)
  • Three credits earned in BCHM 49900 (Honors Thesis in Biochemistry)
  • (1) BCHM 49000 (Undergraduate Seminar) and (3) BCHM 49800 (Research in Biochemistry)
  • (1) BCHM 49000 (Undergraduate Seminar) and (3) BCHM 49801 (Head Start in Biochemistry Research)
  • (1) BCHM 49000 (Undergraduate Seminar) and (3) BCHM 49900 (Honors Thesis in Biochemistry)
  • (1) BTNY 49700 (Undergraduate Seminar) and (1-3) BTNY 49800 (Research in Plant Science), or with prior approval of the Botany and Plant Pathology faculty, a study abroad, course project, supervised internship, or other supervised work-related experience equivalent to BTNY 49700 and BTNY 49800.
  • (10) EDCI 49800 (Supervised Teaching of Agricultural Education)
  • (1) ENTM 49200 (Capstone Experience in Entomology I) and (1) ENTM 49300 (Capstone Experience in Entomology II)
  • (1) ENTM 49390 (Insect Biology Capstone Forum)
  • (1) EPCS 40100 (Senior Participation in EPICS) or (2) EPCS 40200 (Senior Participation in EPICS)
  • (3) FNR 40800 (Natural Resources Planning)
  • (3) FNR 43300 (Grand Challenges in Forest Managment)
  • (3) FNR 44700 (Population Dynamics)
  • (3) FNR 45700 (Practical Fisheries Managment)
  • (3) FNR 45800 (Advanced Marine Biology)
  • (3) FNR 48410 (Sustainable Wood and Furniture Design Manufacturing)
  • (1-6) FNR 49900 (Thesis)
  • (3) FNR 58600 (Urban Ecology)
  • (3) FS 44300 (Food Processing III)
  • (3) HORT 42500 (Landscape Horticulture Capstone Project)
  • (1) HORT 42600 (Landscape Contracting and Management Capstone Experience)
  • (1) HORT 42700 (Horticulture Capstone)
  • (1) HORT 44000 (Public Garden Management)
  • (1) HORT 44500 (Strategic Analysis of Horticultural Production and Marketing)
  • (1) HORT 49200 (Horticultural Science Capstone Seminar)
  • (3) IT 48300 (Facility Design for Lean Manufacturing)
  • (5) LA 42600 (Capstone Course in Landscape Architecture)
  • (1-3) NRES 41000 (Research in Natural Resources and Environmental Science)
  • (1) NRES 42000 (Environmental Internship Reporting)
  • (2) NRES 49700 (Current Topics in Environmental Sciences)

HUMANITIES AND/OR SOCIAL SCIENCES (15 CREDITS)

Revised June 6, 2013

The objectives of the humanities and social sciences component of the agriculture core curriculum are for students to acquire a fundamental understanding of economics and will provide students with the ability to examine systematically and quantitatively how economic, social, cultural, and political systems function and interact with one another and understand how individuals and groups contribute to the fabric of our diverse society. Humanities courses encourage students to broaden their intellectual perspectives beyond their selected fields of study. It is hoped that by viewing their own lives in a broader context of human experience, and by examining their own preconceptions and beliefs and those of others, students will gain a greater appreciation for the depth and breadth of human culture and their place within it.

Each plan of study must include 3 credits of economics, 3 credits of University Curriculum Council (UCC) approved humanities selection, plus 9 credits of additional humanities and social science selectives (approved by the Agriculture Curriculum and Student Relations Committee) of which at least 3 credits must be at the 30000 level or higher. Of these 15 credits, at least nine must be from outside the College of Agriculture.

ECONOMICS

Courses meeting the economics selective requirement (unless superseded by departmental requirements – refer to individual plans of study) include:

  • (3) AGEC 20300 (Introductory Microeconomics for Food and Agribusiness)
  • (3) AGEC 20400 (Introduction to Resource Economics and Environmental Policy)
  • (3) AGEC 21700 (Economics)
  • (3) ECON 21000 (Principles of Economics)
  • (3) ECON 25100 (Microeconomics)
  • (3) ECON 25200 (Macroeconomics)

Plans of study may include AGEC 21700 or ECON 21000, but not both.

HUMANITIES AND/OR SOCIAL SCIENCES

A list of courses meeting the UCC Humanities Selective requirement is available from the University Curriculum Council website.

Additionally, these courses, along with courses meeting the humanities and social science selective categories, are included in the Ag Core course listing:

Ag Core Courses in (filterable) Excel format

Often, students meet the international understanding or multicultural awareness requirement with the humanities and social science selections, so wise selection is recommended.

INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING (9 CREDITS)

Revised September 24, 2020

All undergraduate plans of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, or Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture must include a minimum of nine credits from the international understanding selectives list on this page, or equivalent study abroad programs, international travel courses, or international work experiences. Six credits are required in programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering or Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering degree.

International understanding selective credits may be used to fulfill written and oral communication, social sciences and humanities, or departmental requirements.

In today's rapidly changing international environment, students must broaden their understanding and appreciation of the historic, cultural, linguistic, and geographic diversity of the world's peoples, while enhancing their ability to interact effectively with people from other cultures. The objective of the international understanding component of the core curriculum is to stimulate students to explore the world and responsibly apply their learning and knowledge to global challenges.

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS OR INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL COURSES

In lieu of including nine or more credits of international understanding selectives in a plan of study, students may partially or totally fulfill the international understanding requirements by earning credits in an approved study abroad program or international travel course.

Regardless of the academic discipline, all credits earned in an approved study abroad program or international travel course may be used toward the nine-credit international understanding requirement.

INTERNATIONAL WORK EXPERIENCE

Successful completion of an approved noncredit international work experience (AGR 49500) may be used as follows:

  • An experience of 4-7 weeks may be used in lieu of three credits of international understanding selectives to fulfill the international understanding requirement.
  • A minimum eight-week summer session experience may be used in lieu of six credits of international understanding selectives to fulfill the international understanding requirement.
  • An academic semester experience may be used in lieu of nine credits of international understanding selectives.
Total number of credits required for graduation are not reduced when students fulfill international understanding requirements through participation in approved noncredit international work experiences.

MILITARY SERVICE IN OTHER COUNTRIES

Military service in other countries may be used as follows:

  • Documented military service of 4-7 weeks may be used in lieu of three credits of international understanding selectives to fulfill the international understanding requirement.
  • Documented military service in other countries equivalent to an eight-week summer session may be used in lieu of six credits of international understanding selectives to fulfill the international understanding requirement.
  • Documented military service in other countries equivalent to an academic semester may be used in lieu of nine credits of international understanding selectives.
Total number of credits required for graduation are not reduced when students fulfill international understanding requirements through military service in other countries.

FOREIGN CITIZENS

Foreign citizens who have lived in their native country prior to enrolling at Purdue University fulfill the College of Agriculture International Understanding core requirement.

INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING SELECTIVES

International understanding selectives have been approved by the Agriculture Curriculum and Student Relations Committee. The courses meeting this requirement are identified in the Ag Core course listing:

Ag Core Courses in (filterable) Excel format

Often, students meet the international understanding requirement by wisely selecting communications, humanities, and/or social sciences selectives or other courses which apply to toward the major.

Advisors may nominate additional courses for inclusion as selectives by submitting course information to the Curriculum and Student Relations Committee. Nominated courses must meet at least one of the following criteria to merit inclusions as an international understanding selective.

  1. Engage appropriately and effectively with people from other countries and cultures.
  2. Communicate with people from other cultures including those who speak languages other than English.
  3. Identify and understand both similarities and differences in values and social norms across countries and cultures.
  4. Demonstrate awareness of the variety of political and economic systems in different countries.
  5. Understand the influence of history, geography, ethnicity, religion and other factors on contemporary countries, societies and cultures.

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES (26 CREDITS)

Revised September 15, 2020

The objectives of the mathematics and sciences component of the core curriculum are for students to acquire a foundation of knowledge in mathematics, chemistry, and the biological sciences and physical sciences, an understanding of the scientific method, and the ability to apply their knowledge and problem-solving skills to relevant issues.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (8 CREDITS)

To fulfill the biological sciences core requirement, all students must complete at least two hours of laboratory credit in biological sciences each week for 32 weeks, or equivalent. Completion of course sequences is recommended. Courses with an (*) have a laboratory component.

  • (4) BIOL 11000 (Fundamentals of Biology I) *
  • (4) BIOL 11100 (Fundamentals of Biology II) *
  • (2) BIOL 12100 (Biology I: Diversity, Ecology, and Behavior)
  • (3) BIOL 13100 (Biology II: Diversity, Development, Structure and Function of Organisms)
  • (2) BIOL 13500 (First-Year Biology Laboratory)*
  • (1) BIOL 13600 (Quantitative and Problem Solving Skills)
  • (1) BIOL 13700 (Handling Cells and Tissues, Microscopy)
  • (1) BIOL 13800 (Information and Communication Skills)
  • (1) BIOL 13900 (Measurements and Basic Solution Chemistry)
  • (2) BIOL 19500 (First-Year Biology Laboratory)*
  • (4) BIOL 20300 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) *
  • (4) BIOL 20400 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) *
  • (4) BIOL 22100 (Introduction to Microbiology) *
  • (3) BIOL 23000 (Biology of the Living Cell)
  • (3) BIOL 23100 (Biology III: Cell Structure and Function)
  • (2) BIOL 23200 (Laboratory in Biology III: Cell Structure and Function)*
  • (3) BIOL 24100 (Biology IV: Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 24200 (Laboratory on Biology IV: Genetics and Molecular Biology)*
  • (2) BIOL 27000 (Cell Structure and Function)
  • (2) BIOL 27100 (Laboratory in Cell Structure and Function) *
  • (2) BIOL 28000 (Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 28100 (Laboratory in Genetics and Molecular Biology)*
  • (1) BIOL 29500 (Quantitative Biology of the Living Cell)
  • (4) BTNY 11000 (Introduction to Plant Science)*
  • (4) BTNY 11100 (Principles of Plant Biology)
  • (4) BTNY 12000 ( Principles of Plant Biology 1)
  • (4) BTNY 12100 ( Principles of Plant Biology II)
  • (4) BTNY 21000 (Introduction to Plant Science) *
  • (4) HORT 30100 (Plant Physiology) *

 

 GENERAL CHEMISTRY (6 CREDITS)

  • (3) CHM 11100 (General Chemistry) and (3) CHM 11200 (General Chemistry)
  • (4) CHM 11500 (General Chemistry) and (4) CHM 11600 (General Chemistry)

 CALCULUS (3 CREDITS)

  • (3) MA 15910 (Introduction to Calculus)
  • (3) MA 16010 (Applied Calculus I)
  • (3) MA 16020 (Applied Calculus II)
  • (5) MA 16100 (Plane Analytic Geometry and Calculus I)
  • (4) MA 16500 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus I)
  • (3) MA 22000 (Introduction to Calculus)
  • (3) MA 22300 (Introductory Analysis I)
  • (3) MA 22400 (Calculus for LIfe Science I)
  • Or an approved mathematics course/sequence for a particular major

 STATISTICS (3 CREDITS)

  • (3) STAT 30100 (Elementary Statistical Methods)
  • (3) STAT 50100 (Experimental Statistics I)
  • (3) STAT 50300 (Statistical Methods for Biology)
  • (5) STAT 51100 (Statistical Methods)

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (1-3 CREDITS)

The objective of the Science, Technology, and Society component of the core is to have students understand and reflect upon the complex issues raised by technological and scientific changes and their effects on society and the global world by making sense of, evaluating, and responding to present and future changes that shape individuals’ work, public, and personal lives. A list of courses meeting this requirement is available from the University Curriculum Council website. Additionally, these courses are included in the Ag Core course listing:

Ag Core Courses in (filterable) Excel format

ADDITIONAL MATHEMATICS AND/OR SCIENCES (3-5 CREDITS)

  • (3) AGR 33300 (Data Science for Agriculture)
  • (3) AGEC 35200 (Quantitative Techniques for Firm Decision Making)
  • (3) AGEC 45100 (Applied Econometrics)
  • (3) AGRY 12500 ( Environmental Science and Conservation)
  • (3) AGRY 25500 (Soil Science)
  • (3) AGRY 27000 (Forest Soils)
  • (3) AGRY 29000 (Intro to environmental Science)
  • (3) AGRY 32000 (Genetics)
  • (1) AGRY 32100 (Genetics Laboratory)
  • (3) AGRY 33500 (Weather and Climate)
  • (2) AGRY 33600 (General Meteorology)
  • (3) AGRY 36500 (Soil Fertility)
  • (3) AGRY 38500 ( Environmental Soil Chemistry)
  • (3) AGRY 46500 (Soil Physics Properties)
  • (3) ANSC 22100 (Principles of Animal Nutrition)
  • (4) ANSC 23000 (Physiology of Domestic Animals)
  • (2) BCHM 10000 (Intro to Biochemistry)
  • (3) BCHM 30700 (Biochemistry)
  • (1) BCHM 30900 (Biochemistry Laboratory)
  • (4) BIOL 22100 (Introduction to Microbiology)
  • (3) BIOL 23100 (Biology III: Cell Structure and Function)
  • (2) BIOL 23200 (Laboratory in Biology III: Cell Structure and Function)
  • (3) BIOL 24100 (Biology IV: Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 24200 (Laboratory in Biology IV: Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 27000 (Cell Structure and Function)
  • (2) BIOL 27100 (Laboratory in Cell Structure and Function)
  • (2) BIOL 28000 (Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 28100 (Laboratory in Genetics and Molecular Biology)
  • (2) BIOL 28600 (Introduction to Ecology and Evolution)
  • (2) BIOL 28700 (Laboratory in Introduction to Ecology)
  • (4) BTNY 11000 (Introduction to Plant Science)
  • (4) BTNY 11100 (Principles of Plant Biology)
  • (4) BTNY 21000 (Introduction to Plant Science)
  • (3) BTNY 21100 (Plants and the Environment)
  • (3) BTNY 26200 (Plant Structure and Tissue Biology)
  • (3) BTNY 30100 (Introductory Plant Pathology)
  • (3) BTNY 30500 (Plant Evolution and Taxonomy)
  • (4) BTNY 31600 (Plant Anatomy)
  • (3) BTNY 35000 (Biotechnology in Agriculture)
  • (4) CHM 22400 (Introductory Quantitative Analysis)
  • (3) CHM 25500 (Organic Chemistry)
  • (1) CHM 25501 (Organic Chemistry Laboratory)
  • (3) CHM 25600 (Organic Chemistry)
  • (1) CHM 25601 (Organic Chemistry Laboratory)
  • (4) CHM 25700 (Organic Chemistry)
  • (1) CHM 25701 (Organic Chemistry Laboratory)
  • (3) CHM 26100 (Organic Chemistry)
  • (3) CHM 26200 (Organic Chemistry)
  • (1) CHM 26300 (Organic Chemistry Laboratory)
  • (1) CHM 26400 (Organic Chemistry Laboratory)
  • (3) CS 15800 (C Programming)
  • (4) CS 18000 (Programming I)
  • (3) EAS 11100 (Physical Geology)
  • (3) EAS 11200 (Earth Through Time)on)
  • (3) EAS 22100 (Survey of Atmospheric Science)
  • (3) EAPS 11100 (Physical Geology)
  • (3) EAPS 11200 (Earth Through Time)
  • (3) EAPS 11300 (Intro to Environmental Science)
  • (3) EAPS 22100 (Survey of Atmospheric Science)
  • (2) ENTM 10200 (The Practice of Science)
  • (2) ENTM 20600 (General Entomology)
  • (1) ENTM 20700 (General Entomology Laboratory)
  • (3) ENTM 21000 (Introduction to Insect Behavior)
  • (3) ENTM 24200 (Data Science)
  • (4) ENTM 25300 (Insect Physiology and Biochemistry)
  • (3) ENTM 30100 (Experimentation & Analysis)
  • (2) ENTM 30600 (General Applied Entomology)
  • (1) ENTM 30700 (Companion Laboratories to ENTM 30600)
  • (3) ENTM 34000 (Insect Pests of Trees, Turf, and Ornamentals)
  • (2) ENTM 35300 (Insecticides & Environment)
  • (2) ENTM 41000 (Applied Insect Biology)
  • (1) ENTM 41001 ( Insects of Urban Landscapes)
  • (3) FNR 12500 (Environmental Science and Conservation)
  • (3) FNR 20100 (Marine Biology)
  • (3) FNR 23000 (The World's Forests and Society)
  • (3) FNR 24000 (Wildlife in America)
  • (3) FNR 24150 ( Ecology and Systematics of Fish and Reptiles)
  • (3) FNR 25150 (Ecology and Systematics of Birds and Mammals)
  • (3) FNR 30500 (Conservation Genetics)
  • (3) FNR 35700 (Fundamental Remote Sensing)
  • (3) HONR 49900 (Human Diseases and Disorders)
  • (4) HORT 30100 (Plant Physiology)
  • (3) HORT 35000 (Biotechnology in Agriculture)
  • (5) MA 16200 (Plane Analytic Geometry and Calculus II)
  • (4) MA 16600 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus II)
  • (3) MA 22400 (Introductory Analysis II)
  • (3) MA 23200 (Calculus for the Life Sciences II)
  • (4) MA 26100 (Multivariate Calculus)
  • (3) MA 26500 (Linear Algebra)
  • (3) NRES 12500 (Environmental Science and Conservation)
  • (3) NRES 23000 (Survey of Meteorology)
  • (3) NRES 25500 (Soil Science)
  • (4) PHYS 15200 (Mechanics)
  • (4) PHYS 17200 (Modern Mechanics)
  • (3) PHYS 21400 (The Nature of Physics)
  • (4) PHYS 22000 (General Physics)
  • (4) PHYS 22100 (General Physics)
  • (4) PHYS 23300 (Physics of Living Systems I)
  • (4) PHYS 23400 (Physics of Living Systems II)
  • (3) PHYS 24100 (Electricity and Optics)
  • (3) ​STAT 22500 (Introduction to Probability Methods)
  • (3) STAT 50200 (Experimental Statistics II)
  • (3) STAT 51100 (Statistical Methods)
  • (3) STAT 51200 (Applied Regression Analysis)

MULTICULTURAL AWARENESS (3 CREDITS)

All undergraduate plans of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Forestry, or Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture must include a minimum of three credits of multicultural awareness selectives.

Students must broaden their awareness of the United States domestic, multicultural environment. The objective of the multicultural awareness component of the core curriculum is to stimulate students to become aware of self and others to be better prepared for the workplace and participatory citizenship. Students are encouraged to explore coursework outside their own culture.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  1. Examine one’s beliefs, values and assumptions regarding cultural differences and social group memberships and experiences.

  2. Analyze the specific intersections of two or more social groups, and the challenges that can result from those intersections.

    1. Social groups can refer to those defined by race, gender, ethnicity, nationality, age, language, citizenship, religion, class, sexual orientation, or physical ability.

  3. Evaluate how inclusion in, and exclusion from, social groups manifests, and the relationship to the power and privilege of dominant cultures.

    1. Social groups include the groups defined in 2a.

    2. Achieving this outcome may involve analysis of discrimination based on gender, race, sex, class, social stratification, disabilities, or membership of another social or cultural group.

  4. Examine differences in communication within multicultural interactions and settings.

    Achieving this outcome may involve

    1. Analysis of verbal and nonverbal communication used by cultural groups.

    2. Demonstrating communication using both non-discriminatory language and non-verbal behaviors, to bridge the differences across cultures and social groups.

The requirement may be fulfilled by taking courses approved by the Agriculture Curriculum and Student Relations Committee. The courses meeting this requirement are identified in the Ag Core course listing which is available in the format below:

Ag Core Courses in (filterable) Excel format

Most often, students meet the multicultural awareness requirement by wisely selecting a communications, humanities, or social science selective, or another course applying toward the major.

Alternatively, students may complete an approved non-credit multicultural awareness work experience (AGR 49600) of a minimum of 4-weeks duration in lieu of 3 credits of a multicultural awareness selective. The Associate Dean for diversity will be the instructor of record for AGR 49600. Course proposals that address the learning objectives of the experience and define how the culture in which the immersion will take place is different from their native culture will be evaluated for approval by the Assistant Dean for diversity. Approval is required as a condition for registration.

TRANSFER & ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT APPLICABILITY IN PURDUE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE PLANS OF STUDY

Increasingly, students matriculate to Purdue academic programs with prior credit for college-level work. Whether this was college work transferred to Purdue, advanced placement credit, or dual-degree credit for work completed while in high school, these are the guidelines regarding credit use.

The Purdue online transfer credit database should be helpful to identify Purdue course equivalents. Purdue Admissions handles all transfer credit evaluation and instructions are on their page.

If a course shows up on the Purdue transcript with a prefix and number with TR (transfer) or CR (credit), it may be used toward any degree requirement as though the course was completed at Purdue with a passing grade (For example, HIST 10400 TR can be a UCC humanities selection.)  Students cannot receive duplicate credit for the same course and the latest transcript posting applies.  (For example, if a student has CHM 11500 CR on the transcript but chooses to take CHM 11500 for credit and earns an B, only 4 credits of CHM 11500 with the B can apply toward the degree.)

Some transfer and prior work appears on the transcript as undistributed credit. (For example, HIST 1XXXX course.)  These courses are not equivalent to any Purdue course; their use on a plan of study is possible, but not guaranteed.  Students will not receive credit multiple times for repeated identical subject matter.

Advanced Placement (AP) Test scores of 4 or 5 lead to Purdue course equivalents on the transcript and this course listing is included on Purdue Admissions web pages. For applicability of AP credits earned with a 3 on the AP test (which result in undistributed credit) to Purdue Agriculture Plans of Study, refer to the example and table below.

Undistributed credit (AP score of 3 leading to 1XXXX credit) cannot be used to meet University Core requirements; if an Agriculture requirement which is typically used to meet a University Core requirement is met with 1XXXX course, the University Core requirement remains unmet.

Calculus AB/BC with a score of 3 will show up on a Purdue transcript as MA 15555, but is not applicable toward graduation in any College of Agriculture baccalaureate degree programs. However, MA 15555 may be used to fulfull the UCC STS. 

Example: AP credits earned as Biology which show up on a Purdue transcript as BIOL 1XXXX may be used in an Agriculture plan of study as elective unless there are earned Purdue credits in BIOL 11000 (in which case, the BIOL 1XXXX credits are redundant and cannot apply toward the degree).

 

AP Credits earned as …       

Whic​h show up on a Purdue transcript as …

May be used in Agriculture plans
of study the same as...

Unless there are earned Purdue credits in ...

       
Biology BIOL 1XXXX (Biology) Elective* BIOL 11000
Language and Composition ENGL 1XXXX (Language and Composition) ENGL 10100 ENGL 10600
Literature and Composition ENGL 1XXXX (Literature and Composition) Humanities Selective ENGL 23100
Environmental Science EAPS 1XXXX
(Environmental Science)
Elective* EAPS 11300
Human Geography EAPS 1XXXX
(Human Geography)
Elective* EAPS 12000
European History HIST 1XXXX (European History) Humanities Selective HIST 10400
United States History HIST 1XXXX
(United States History)
Humanities Selective HIST 15100 or HIST 15200
World History HIST 1XXXX
(World History)
Humanities Selective HIST 10500
Government & Politics: Comparative POL 1XXXX (Government &
 Politics: Comparative)
Social Science
Selective
POL 14100
Government & Politics: United States POL 1XXXX (Government &
Politics: United States)
Social Science
Selective
POL 10100
Macroeconomics ECON 2XXXX (Macroeconomics) Social Science
Selective
AGEC 21700 or ECON 21000 or ECON 25200
Microeconomics ECON 2XXXX (Microeconomics) Social Science
Selective
AGEC 20300 or ECON 25100
Physics I PHYS 1XXXX
(Physics I)
PHYS 21400 or Elective PHYS 22000
Physics II PHYS 1XXXX
(Physics II)
PHYS 21400 or Elective PHYS 22000 or PHYS 22100
Physics B PHYS 1XXXX
(Physics B)
PHYS 21400 or Elective PHYS 21400 or PHYS 22000
Physics C - Electricity &
Magnetism
PHYS 1XXXX
(Physics C -
Electricity & Magnetism)
PHYS 21400 or Elective PHYS 27200
Physics C – Mechanics PHYS 1XXXX
(Physics C - Mechanics)
PHYS 21400 or Elective PHYS 17200
Psychology PSY 1XXXX Social Science
Selective
PSY 12000
Statistics STAT 1XXXX Elective* STAT 30100
 * Not Applicable to College of Agriculture Mathematics and Sciences Core Requirements

WRITTEN AND ORAL COMMUNICATION (9 CREDITS)

Revised August, 2017

The written and oral communication component of the core curriculum will enhance students' abilities to communicate with clarity in formal, informal, and technical contexts, to develop and convey logical arguments when discussing problems or ideas, and to evaluate critically the arguments of others. Written and Oral Communication requirements of both the College of Agriculture and Purdue University's Core Curriculum may be fulfilled by completing one of the following options below. Occasionally, students meet the international understanding or multicultural awareness requirement with the Additional Written or Oral Communications selection, so wise selection is recommended.

OPTION 1 (FIRST YEAR STUDENT )

  • (3) COM 11400 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication) or (3) COM 21700 (Science Writing and Presentation) or (3) EDPS 31500 (Collaborative Leadership: Listening) or (3) SCLA 10200 (Transformative Texts, Critical Thinking and Communication II: Modern World)
  • (4) ENGL 10600 (First-Year Composition) or (3) ENGL 10800 (Accelerated First-Year Composition)  or (3) HONR 19903 (Interdisciplinary Approaches in Writing) or (3) SCLA 10100 (Transformative Texts, Critical Thinking and Communication II: Antiquity to Modernity)
  • (3) Additional Written and/or Oral Communications Selection (see Ag Core list – hyperlinked below)

OPTION 2 (TRANSFER STUDENTS - THREE CREDITS OF ENGLISH COMPLETED) †

  • (3) COM 11400 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication) or (3) COM 21700 (Science Writing and Presentation) or (3) EDPS 31500 (Collaborative Leadership: Listening) or (3) SCLA 10200 (Transformative Texts, Critical Thinking and Communication II: Modern World)
  • Transfer credits in freshmen English composition which appear on a Purdue transcript as ENGL 10100, ENGL 10200, ENGL 10300, ENGL 10400, or ENG W131
  • (3) Additional Written and/or Oral Communications Selection (see Ag Core list - hyperlinked below)

OPTION 3 (TRANSFER STUDENTS - THREE CREDITS OF UNDISTRIBUTED ENGLISH COMPLETED) †

  • (3) COM 11400 (Fundamentals of Speech Communication) or (3) COM 21700 (Science Writing and Presentation) or (3) EDPS 31500 (Collaborative Leadership: Listening) or (3) SCLA 10200 (Transformative Texts, Critical Thinking and Communication II: Modern World)
  • (3) Transfer credits in first year English composition (non-remedial) which appear on a Purdue transcript as ENGL 1XXXX
  • (3) UCC Approved Written Communication credits which are not duplicative of other course credits*
  • (3) Additional Written and/or Oral Communications Selection (see Ag Core list - hyperlinked below)

Courses meeting the Additional Written and/or Oral Communications requirement for the College of Agriculture are included in the Ag Core course listing:

Ag Core Courses in (filterable) Excel format

 

 Nine credits are required to fulfill Written and Oral Communication requirements for the baccalaureate degree. The additional three credits may be used in the plan of study at the discretion of the department offering the major.

*If ENGL 1XXXX has not been approved and does not appear on the UCC list of options for Written Communication. 

Students enrolled in curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering or Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering degree may use three credits from courses offered by the School of Languages and Cultures to fulfill the additional Written and Oral Communication requirements if a mini​mum of six credits are earned in a language.