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Count= 205
1 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
 

Norm Ehmann  SALINAS, Calif. — Norm Ehmann, former vice president of Van Waters & Rogers (now Univar) who was considered one of the pest control industry’s top goodwill ambassadors, died Monday from cancer. He was 84.

                                                                                                                View More>>​

2 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:05 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Max Summers


















​The pioneer and co-inventor of the most innovative technology in the life sciences field was recognized with an organization’s highest award during a recent conference in San Antonio.

Dr. Max D. Summers, Distinguished Professor and Holder of the Endowed Chair in Agricultural Biotechnology, received the "Father of Baculovirus Expression Technology" Award during the WilBio 12th International Conference on Baculovirus and Insect Cell Culture on February 2-4.

                                                                                                                  View More>>​

3 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr Krupke  Biotechnology companies are keeping university scientists from fully
  researching the effectiveness and environmental impact of the
  industry’s genetically modified crops, according to an unusual
complaint issued by a group of those scientists.complaint issued by a group of those scientists.
 
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4 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bruce Godby, 49, passed peacefully away at his home on the morning of March 13th, 2009 after a one year and a half long battle with stomach cancer. Born in Lebanon, Indiana, Bruce made his home in Prospect Park, PA for the last 30 years. Bruce received his B.S. degree in Entomology from Purdue University in 1987. Bruce had over thirty years of experience as an entomologist in the pest control industry. His career started as an Entomology Specialist in the United States Air Force where he serviced military installations in Germany and Colorado and the NORAD Command Center. He joined Western in 1988 and began as a technician, quickly being promoted as a cocoa bean inspector within the fumigation division. As a Technical Specialist/Entomologist for Western Pest Services, Bruce played a critical role as the primary inspector to the C.M.A.A. (Cocoa Merchants’ Association of America) for the past 20 years. His other duties for Western Pest Services included support for both the pest control and fumigation divisions.
 
5 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Melissa Shepson and Tom Turpin

Purdue University has been selected to receive the “Educational Video for Youth” award at the annual meeting of the North Central Branch of the Entomological Society of America in St. Louis, MO.

Entomology staff Tom Turpin, Melissa Shepson, Gary Bennett and their colleagues Jos Holman, Michele Farley and Rob Jackson will receive the award from the Board Certified Entomologists of Mid-America for their production of “Catch the Reading Bug”.

The video was used to introduce young people to entomological ideas and arthropods in a fun way through the summer reading program. Young people were encouraged to learn more about these creatures by reading books. DVDs of the video were distributed by the Indiana Pest Management Association and it was available for download on the Indiana Library website. The video was widely used in Indiana and other states.

You can watch the video, which has been split into 2 parts, by following the links below:

Catch the Reading Bug - Part 1
Catch the Reading Bug - Part 2

 
6 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
John Shukle

Congratulations to John Shukle who won first place for his oral presentation on “Species identification of wood-boring beetles using mtDNA from gallery frass”.

He won this award in the B.S. student competition at the ESA North Central Branch meeting in St. Louis earlier this week. John works in the lab of Jeff Holland.

7 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Greg Hunt

Congratulations to Greg Hunt who has been selected as a University Faculty Scholar.

This award recognizes outstanding faculty members at the West Lafayette campus who are on an accelerated path for academic distinction. Eligible faculty must hold the rank of tenured associate or full professor and have been in that rank for no more than five years. New hires appointed with tenure are also eligible.

Since the number of professorships is limited, the competition is quite keen.

Greg is one of four new scholars in the College of Agriculture, and the first from Entomology.

8 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

Congratulations to the faculty and administrative and professional staff members who have been advanced in rank beginning with the next fiscal year.

Faculty Promotions

From Associate to Professor
Bruce P. Bordelon, Horticulture & Landscape Architecture
J. Andrew DeWoody, Forestry & Natural Resources
Greg J. Hunt, Entomology
Joseph M. Irudayaraj, Agricultural & Biological Engineering
William G. Johnson, Botany & Plant Pathology
Clifford F. Weil, Agronomy

9 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Purple panel traps for Emerald Ash Borer
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Emerald ash borer has had a devastating affect on the ash tree population of Indiana and that is why state and federal agencies are once again using purple panel traps as part of a detection survey throughout the state.

The traps, which are bright purple and resemble box kites, are baited with manuka and phoebe oils and lined with glue, which attract and trap nearby emerald ash borers (EAB).

 

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10 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tim Gibb looking at bed bugs under microscope
Tim Gibb looking at bed bugs under a microscope (Photo courtesy of Michael Heinz/Journal & Courier)

    During the fall semester last year, Purdue University had one
    confirmed case of bed bugs in a residence hall because the
    bugs were carried in by a student, said Wendy Tommas-
    Dolick, assistant director for facilities and maintenance in
    University Residences.

    As soon as residence hall staff became aware of the bugs,
    they contacted pest control, she said.

    "If we have any suspicions, pest control is contacted
    immediately, regardless of if it's confirmed or not," Tommas-
    Dolick added.

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11 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Rick Foster
BLACKSBURG, Va., April 7, 2009 – An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment. 

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12 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Children singing from Keguile
Group of children from Keguile village singing a song on PICS technology in front of five hundred villagers, government representatives at Opening Bags Ceremony. (Photo by Dana Palade/World Vision. ©2009

Five hundred farmers, government representatives participated in a groundbreaking "Opening Bags Ceremony” organized by World Vision Niger, and officiated by the Governor of Maradi region in Keguile village, some 600 km east from capital Niamey.

The sample bags contained one of the most important indigenous African grain - the cowpea - now stored in a cheap, simple and non-chemical way promoted by WV project PICS (Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage) in almost 6,000 villages.

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13 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
The Purdue University Department of Entomology took part in the 2009 BioBlitz that was held at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore from noon on Friday, May 15, until noon on Saturday, May 16. This event was hosted by the National Geographic Society and the National Park Service and meant to catalogue and celebrate the biodiversity of the Dunes.
 
14 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Ron and Mary Bitner
Ron and Mary Bitner at Bitner Vineyards (Photo by Jackie Johnston)

Ron Bitner admits wine was the furthest thing from his mind when he purchased the acreage in 1980 for his home near Caldwell, Idaho.

"Bill Broach, the first winemaker for Ste. Chapelle, built his house right below us," Bitner recalls. "I bought the property for the view of the Snake River, and I was scratching my head wondering what I was going to do with this steep hillside.

"It was sagebrush and weeds then, and Bill says to me, 'Ron, you've got a world-class site for Chardonnay there.'

" 'That's cool, Bill, but what's Chardonnay?' " Bitner replied. "I had no clue about wine grapes back then."

Three decades later, he and his wife, Mary, can pour a glass of estate reserve Chardonnay to toast Bitner Vineyards as Wine Press Northwest's 2009 Idaho Winery of the Year.

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15 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Emerald Ash Borer

It's Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week in Indiana.

The Asian beetle was discovered in North America near Detroit in 2004 and has since spread to 11 states. The bug is responsible for the devastation of millions of ash trees in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana.

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16 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Kathy Heinsoln
Photo courtesy of Bill Ryan/The Gazette

Kathy Heinsohn gets jars and envelopes full of bugs in the mail — cockroaches, bedbugs, ants, head lice. She has hives full of bees in her backyard in Brunswick.

Anyone else might call an exterminator, but not Heinsohn. She has arranged her professional and home lives in a way that keeps her surrounded by insects, arachnids and pests.

An entomologist by day, and a budding beekeeper in her free time, Heinsohn, 47, has had a special affinity for invertebrates ever since her childhood on Folly Island, S.C.

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17 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
In recent years bagworms have been able to survive relatively mild Indiana winters and emerge on trees farther north in the state. (Photo courtesy of Purdue Ag Communications)

In recent years bagworms have been able to survive relatively mild Indiana winters and emerge on trees farther north in the state. (Photo courtesy of Purdue Ag Communications)

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Relatively mild Indiana winters over the last several years have caused bagworm infestations to spread northward across the state, said a Purdue University entomologist.

"Typically, bagworms were found in the southern part of the state," said Cliff Sadof. "The last 10 winters have been somewhat mild, causing infestations to spread farther north and increase in severity throughout the state."

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18 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Emerald Ash Borer - Adult

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Now found in 14 states and in Canada, emerald ash borer infestations are taking a major toll on city budgets - but one Purdue University entomologist has introduced a tool that can help cities find the most cost-effective solutions.

"In Indiana alone, ash trees make up at least one-third of all of the street trees planted in cities," said Cliff Sadof, creator of the Emerald Ash Borer Cost Calculator. "Because emerald ash borer (EAB) infestations are fatal to ash trees without costly chemical treatments, many cities are left to cope with tree removal and replacement decisions. The cost calculator is a tool we've created to help cities weigh their options and find the best, most cost-effective solutions for dealing with EAB."

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19 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Nikki VanDerLaan These profiles are part two of a two-part series.

As one of two agriculture students participating in SURF this year, Nikki VanDerLaan is unusual in a program geared towards engineering and science students.

“My professor had an e-mail flyer about SURF and it said it was open to anyone,” VanDerLaan said. “So I applied through him and we pretty much crossed our fingers for the next couple of months hoping to hear from them.”

VanDerLaan’s research deals with the hickory bark beetle. The beetle only attacks hickory trees; the only treatment for infestations now is the removal and destruction of the affected tree. However, VanDerLaan hopes to find a better way to prevent the beetles’ spread. “I’m ... pretty much trying to study their colonization behavior and trying to determine what pheromones they use as an attractant to bring other hickory beetles to the tree,” she said. “And then once I find that pheromone, to use that to somehow prevent them from coming to the hickory trees to attack them.”

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20 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tiny yellow lights hover in the backyard. Kids squeal and clasp their hands around winking insects, hoping to capture their glow in a glass jar.

Central Indiana is blinking to life from lightning bug season -- a time when porch dwellers and third-graders share a common wonder for a bug that can produce light from its body.

That talent is inspiring cancer research and treatment, and the entomology department at Purdue University is leading a campaign to make lightning bugs the official insect of Indiana.

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21 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin

The Entomological Foundation will recognize and celebrate Dr. Tom Turpin for his accomplishments in and outstanding commitment to the field of entomology and his contributions to educating and exciting young people and adults about science through insects at the Foundation’s 17th Annual Dinner and Dance in Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Turpin currently teaches one of the most popular courses at Purdue University that draws more than 450 students each semester.

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22 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS)

Purdue Extension educators involved in Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) have set up a blog to share the upcoming PICS Nigeria Extension experience with anyone who is interested. Follow along with the updates and information here.

The goal of the PICS project is to have 50% of cowpea in West and Central Africa stored with non-chemical hermetic methods by 2011.

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23 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Jeffrey Bloomquist

It is my pleasure to announce that Dr. Jeffrey Bloomquist (BS ‘78) has been selected to receive the 2009 John V. Osmun Alumni Professional Achievement Award in Entomology.

Dr. Bloomquist did his M.S. degree at Mississippi State University with Dan Shankland, and his Ph.D. at UC Riverside with Tom Miller before accepting a faculty position at Virginia Tech in 1989 where he is professor of entomology. His research program is focused on the interactions of ligand molecules with protein receptors found on cell membranes.

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24 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Pterourus glaucus) is one of more than two dozen types of butterflies commonly found in Tippecanoe County.(Photo courtesy of Lafayette Online)

The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Pterourus glaucus) is one of more than two dozen types of butterflies commonly found in Tippecanoe County.(Photo courtesy of Lafayette Online)

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University Entomology and Eli Lilly and Co.’s Tippecanoe Laboratories are once again sponsoring the Tippecanoe County Butterfly Encounter, Saturday, July 18, for butterfly enthusiasts of all ages and expert levels.

The event, which begins with a newly added insect photography workshop, will convene at 9:00 am at the Lilly Tippecanoe Laboratories Wildlife Habitat Area in Lafayette, Indiana. A picnic lunch, sponsored by Eli Lilly and Co., will be served at noon, followed by a short butterfly identification tutorial. Participants will break into groups to count the butterflies present in the habitat and will reconvene as a large group at 3:30 pm to tabulate the results.

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25 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Catherine Hill

Dr. Catherine Hill has been named as an Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy Fellow for 2009-2010. Through the Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy, through Discovery Park's Burton Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, faculty members learn how to incorporate entrepreneurial concepts into their programs and identify potential commercial opportunities. Faculty also meet with distinguished administrators and leaders to discuss topics critical to the development and support of leadership and entrepreneurial skills. Faculty members who complete the 2009-10 program each receive a $5,000 development award and gain access to Discovery Park staff, equipment and resources.

26 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Linda Mason

Dr. Linda Mason has been chosen as a CIC Academic Leadership Program Fellow for the 2009-2010 academic year. The program is offered through the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), an academic consortium of Big Ten universities and the University of Chicago. CIC-ALP is designed to develop the leadership and managerial skills of faculty who have demonstrated exceptional ability and administrative promise. It is specifically oriented to the challenges of academic administration of major research universities and preparing faculty members to meet those challenges.

27 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Butterfly Count 2009

The 2009 Butterfly Encounter was held on Saturday, July 18 from 9:00-4:00 at the Eli Lilly Tippecanoe County Laboratory’s Wildlife Habitat Area in Lafayette. The success of an event such as this is based in large part upon the level of excitement and enthusiasm of the participants, so by that measure this year was a true success! Our registration indicates that we had between 100-110 people participating. The property looked quite beautiful with an abundant display of wildlife and a wide variety of wildflowers in bloom.

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28 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Volunteer corn, as shown above, is an increasingly common weed in Indiana soybean fields
Volunteer corn, as shown above, is an increasingly common weed in Indiana soybean fields

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Volunteer corn can act as a safe harbor for some pests by expressing lower doses of the insecticide found in newly planted corn, according to Purdue University researchers.

Christian Krupke, an assistant professor of entomology, said western corn rootworm larvae feed on volunteer corn, unwanted plants that grow from seed dropped during the previous year's harvest. Volunteer corn doesn't have a full dose of the insecticide Bt, which can help the rootworms build up resistance.

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29 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

A distinguished group of international experts interested in cowpea plant protection in Africa met at Purdue University for a two-day meeting on August 3rd and 4th. The group led by entomology professor Larry Murdock had two objectives. The first was to consider the future of biotech cowpea, particularly needs and opportunities, goal setting and prioritization. The second was to outline a framework for a new cowpea mega project with a global perspective to improve cowpea production. Participants included industry, government and university scientists from Africa, Australia and the US.

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30 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

Governor Mitch Daniels signed legislation (House Enrolled Act No 1203) that establishes a new Indiana Invasive Species Council in a public event at the State House on August 11, 2009.

The purpose of the council is to work with state and private organizations to identify priorities and projects, help secure funding, propose rules and laws, educate the public, and facilitate communication related to the growing threat of invasive species in the state. Members of the council will include representatives from state agencies, industry and environmental groups. The College of Agriculture at Purdue University will convene the group and serve as the secretariat for the council.

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31 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
honey bee

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Short-term aggressive behavior in European honey bees involves many of the same gene expression patterns found in the inherently more aggressive Africanized bees, according to research scheduled to appear online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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32 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Volunteer corn, as shown above, is an increasingly common weed in Indiana soybean fields
Voles, seen here, are one of the many backyard pests common this time of year.

A look around gardener Pat Wright's Lafayette yard reveals roses, marigolds, hollyhocks and a host of other flowers, as well as water plants around her pond.

She usually has to contend with insects. "It's better now than it was a month ago," she said. Japanese beetles and other pests caused some problems this summer.

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33 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Ian Kaplan 

Dr. Ian Kaplan, Assistant Professor, comes to Purdue from Cornell University, where he was a postdoctoral associate. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Davidson College, his master’s in entomology from Auburn University, and the Ph.D in entomology from the University of Maryland.

Ian’s work is in specialty crops entomology. His research is at the interface of ecology and agriculture with the goal of applying theoretical principles from population and community ecology to insects on crop plants.​

34 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jesse Hoteling

The inaugural cohort of Woodrow WIlson Indiana Teaching Fellows at Purdue started this summer. The teaching fellows is a pioneering program to staff rural secondary schools with highly qualified science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teachers. Applications are now being accepted for the 2010 cohort of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows. Early submission deadline is October 12 and the final deadline is January 12, 2010. Apply online here.

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35 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Migrating soybean aphids on Steve Yaninek

The latest buzz around campus has nothing to do with gossip, but instead with winged pests migrating through the area.

According to Steve Yaninek, head of the department of entomology, the gnats that have been swarming around campus the last few days are soybean aphids migrating from soybeans to another plant where they prepare for winter. He said the aphids are normally found on soybeans in the summertime, but in the fall they migrate to buckthorn plants to lay their eggs, which last the winter and hatch during the next warm season.

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36 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Wayne and Mary HockmeyerThe structural biology professor lost precious time when more than a year ago the pipes below the floor in his Lily Hall basement lab broke.

"The whole underneath of our lab floor had washed away from the water and we had to clear out of there because the whole floor could collapse," he said.

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37 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

"As I step down from serving 6 years as the Chairman of the NPIRS Advisory Council, it gives me great pleasure, as my final official act, to bestow this award on Vicki.

When Vicki took over the NPIRS project we were in a deep financial hole.

Through her leadership, tireless work, gregarious personality, and far-reaching vision, Vicki and the rest of the CERIS staff have developed a series of successful products that provide invaluable information to all users of pesticide data. Vicki has worked relentlessly to develop the finest working relationship, between regulators and the regulated pesticide industry, that I have seen in my 25 years of working with pesticide issues.

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38 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue University's Department of Entomology will bring Tippecanoe County fifth-graders to campus on Tuesday (Oct. 13) for its 13th annual Science on Six Legs: An Insectaganza of Education.

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39 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

Decomposing bodies stuck in a trash can sounds like a crime scene from an episode of CSI, but for some Purdue students it became a reality.

Purdue’s ENTM 295 class traveled down to Knoxville, Tenn., to visit a “body farm,” where over 150 bodies are decomposing. Dayson Smith, senior in the College of Technology, attended and said while at the farm, students collected maggots, documented temperatures and measured key points.

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40 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

The increasingly fractious relationship between public sector researchers and the biotech seed industry has come into the spotlight in recent months. In July, several leading seed companies met with a group of entomologists, who earlier in the year had lodged a public complaint with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over restricted access to materials. In a letter to the EPA, the 26 public sector scientists complained that crop developers are curbing their rights to study commercial biotech crops. "No truly independent research can be legally conducted on many critical questions involving these crops [because of company-imposed restrictions]," they wrote.

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41 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WLFI) - It might not be Paul and Ringo, but Lafayette is experiencing its own kind of beetle mania.

For the next couple of weeks, you can expect to see swarms of Asian Lady Beetles around homes and buildings.

The beetles were introduced to the United States by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help control aphids in crops.

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42 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. John Osmun

One of the highlights of the second day of NPMA PestWorld was the presentation of the NPMA Pinnacle Award to Dr. John Osmun. The annual award celebrates an individual’s lifetime of dedication and commitment to the pest management industry.

This year’s award went to a true industry pioneer, Dr. John Osmun. Few industry professionals have had as significant and long-lasting an impact on the field of pest management as Dr. Osmun, an outspoken advocate for PCO education and enhanced industry standards.

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43 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. John Osmun

A team of 12 students and 3 faculty members from the Department traveled to Cincinnati, Ohio on November 6th to compete in the Twenty Second Annual Forum of the Ohio Valley Entomological Association (OVEA). Twenty students from 4 different universities took part in the competition. Purdue gave 9 presentations and came home with 7 awards as indicated below. A complete account the event will be posted on the OVEA website. A special thanks to Linda Mason who provides outstanding faculty leadership for our participation in OVEA, and to Grzesiek Buczkowski who helped with the judging.

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44 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Jerry Macklin

Dr. Jerry Milton Macklin, 80, of Rocky Ford, Colo., a former area resident, died Saturday, Oct. 31, 2009, at his residence.

Born June 28, 1929, in Bryant, he was the son of the late Paul R. and Juanita Whiteman Macklin.

He received his bachelor's degree in agriculture and biology in 1952 from Purdue University. He received a master's degree in 1956 and a Ph.D. in 1961 in entomology from Purdue. He served in the Army during the Korean War from 1953 to 1955, and taught radio repeater in the signal school at Camp Gordon in Augusta, Ga.

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45 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Charles Bacon

Congratulations to Charles Bacon who has been selected as the 2009 recipient of the Outstanding Service Award for Administrative, Professional, Clerical, and Service staff in the Department. An award ceremony and luncheon is scheduled for December 18th in WSLR 116. Details will be forthcoming.

I thank Doug Richmond, chairman, and the other members of the OSA selection committee (Mike Hill, Paula Layden and Vishal Lodha) for making this important decision on behalf of the Department.

Well done Charles!

46 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Mike Scharf Studies Termites

For years now Mike Scharf has been diving into the guts of termites, trying to figure out how to reproduce their magic. Termites, as every kid knows, can eat their way through a gnarly piece of wood and destroy a new house while the paint is still drying.

They do that by mysteriously converting plant material into fuel to power their complex lifestyles. And they do it better than almost anything else on the planet, especially the pricy, human-made processing plants that are trying to replicate what comes naturally to bugs like termites.

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47 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Ad Infinitum Play

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Entomology and theater usually aren't subjects that go together, but in an upcoming vaudeville at Purdue University, the two will combine in an effort to integrate the disciplines of theater and science.

Students in academic disciplines across the university, including several from the College of Agriculture, will present "Ad Infinitum" at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 2 and 3 at the Mallett Theater in Pao Hall on Purdue's West Lafayette campus.

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48 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Ad Infinitum Play

Livestock production systems and some husbandry practices are prone to producing veterinary important entomological concerns. In addition, various arthropod-borne diseases?such as West Nile and some types of encephalitis?can affect both humans and animals. To circumvent these problems successfully, a solid understanding of veterinary entomology should be the foundation of comprehensive animal-health programs and production management practices.

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49 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Pi Chi Omega Video - Featuring Dr. John Osmun

David Fincannon, A-All Pest Termite Exterminators, Dallas, Texas, filmed a video in which Dr. John Osmun, charter member of Pi Chi Omega, describes the first days of this urban entomological fraternity and the meaning of its logo.

Click here to watch the video!

50 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:16 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

Dr. Catherine Hill's lab recently returned from the 2009 American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Annual Meeting (ASTMH) in Washington, DC. The conference attracted in excess of 4,000 multi-disciplinary scientists and was well-represented by researchers with NIH-funded programs. Dr. Hill organized and co-chaired a symposium that highlighted outcomes from the Ixodes scapularis genome sequencing project.

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51 Yes
  
8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Winter weather has settled upon Indiana, and to curb high heating costs many Hoosiers are looking to firewood. One Purdue University entomologist reminds consumers to educate themselves to avoid unsuspectingly moving invasive species in firewood.

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52 Yes
  
8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS)

A multi-agency collaboration is underway, aimed at fostering the adoption of an improved method of cowpea storage in Nigeria in which about 600,000 cowpea farmers are targeted to benefit.

The arrangement, known as PICS-RIU-ADP collaboration, now in its first year, is expected to grow in its impact to about one million farmers in the second year.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Gary Bennett and others take on the task of updating the pest management industry's textbook

In the blustery cold confines of West Lafayette, Indiana, Gary Bennett gets but a moment of rest. The annual Purdue Pest Management Conference - Bennett's baby for the past 39 years - has just wrapped up and the PMP Hall of Famer quickly shifts his attention to a new labor-intensive project.

He sends an e-mail to two of his longtime friends and former students at Purdue, John Owens and Bobby Corrigan, informing them that it's time. The three entomologists get together by a conference call and begin discussions on the project that will consume their lives for the next 11 months - updating Truman's Scientific Guide to Pest Management Operations.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderon wins first place in ESA 2009 Student Competition

Congratulations to Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderon who is a recipient of a 2009 Entomological Society of America (ESA) student award. Gloria is a Ph.D. student working with Associate Professor, Dr. Catherine Hill in the Department of Entomology. She is conducting research to understand the process of vision in mosquitoes.

This past December, Gloria earned first place in the Medical Entomology division of the ESA Student Competition for a presentation on her thesis research at the 2009 ESA Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana. The title of her presentation was "Mosquito vision: molecular evolution and functional characterization of the opsins in Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti".

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Indiana CAPS

WASHINGTON, Jan. 19, 2010—Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has allocated $45 million, provided by Section 10201 of the 2008 Farm Bill, for projects to build and preserve critical plant health safeguarding initiatives across America. Funding will be provided to more than 50 cooperators including state departments of agriculture, universities, nonprofit organizations and USDA agencies in support of over 200 projects. These state, regional, and national projects will support the Farm Bill goals of building strong systems to safeguard the health of our agricultural industries using early plant pest detection and surveillance, threat identification and mitigation.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

Five Entomology/CERIS staff were recognized on Thursday (1/28) for their years of service to Purdue at the Provost’s Recognition Luncheon. The honored included Bill Kielhorn (10 years), Susan Schechter (15), Joe Hegarty (25), Zakia Kazem (25) and Tammy Luck (30). Congratulations to Bill, Susan, Joe, Zakia and Tammy for their loyalty and dedication to Purdue University and the Department of Entomology. The attached photo include those able to attend the ceremony.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Indiana CAPS

After trying some 50 arrangements of household objects, researchers have come up with a new low-cost, homemade bed-bug detector.

To lure the bugs out of hiding, Wan-Tien Tsai of Rutgers University in New Brunswick put dry ice into an insulated, one-third-gallon jug, the kind available at sports or camping stores. Adding 2.5 pounds of dry ice pellets and not quite closing the pour hole allowed carbon dioxide to leak out at a bug-teasing rate for some 11 hours at room temperature, she said.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Hessian Fly

Resistant wheat plants stave off attacks by Hessian fly larvae by essentially destroying the fly's midgut and its ability to absorb nutrients, according to a study by Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Hessian fly larvae midguts – similar to human intestines – were observed in three different feeding situations. Larvae on susceptible plants had normal midgut function. Those that were given nothing to eat showed no damage to the midgut, though they starved. But those on plants resistant to Hessian flies showed serious midgut disruption.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
David Mueller podcast on stored product pests and his latest book

PCT recently caught up with David Mueller, president and founder of Insects Limited and Fumigation Service & Supply. Mueller is a leading authority on stored product pests who recently authored a book titled "Reducing Customer Complaints in Stored Products." In the following podcast Mueller discusses several topics related to stored product pests and previews his latest book.

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8/20/2014 3:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Swat Pest Names Brandon Runyon (BS '09) Technical Director

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — Swat Pest Management and Healthy Spaces of Evansville, Ind., announced the addition of Brandon Runyon.

As an urban entomologist, Runyon will be the technical director for Swat Pest Management. He began his new position on Jan 4, 2010.

Runyon is a recent graduate of Purdue University with a BS in entomology.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Raymond A. Cloyd (MS '95, PhD '99) Promoted to Full Professor of Entomology at Kansas State University

Raymond A. Cloyd, a professor and extension specialist in the Department of Entomology at Kansas State University (Manhattan, KS), was promoted to full professor in February. Dr. Cloyd was also the recipient of four awards. The first was the 2009 Ohio Florist Association's Bulletin Author of the Year, and he also received three Awards of Merit from the American Rose Society associated with three articles that appeared in publications from the Nashville Rose Society. The articles were 1) "Dormant Oils--Everything You Wanted To Know," 2) "Diffusing Misconceptions About Thrips," and 3) "What Every Rose Grower Should Know About Colony Collapse Disorder."

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Country Ants Make It Big In The City According to Grzegorz Buczkowski

It's a tale of bright lights, big colonies: Rural ants go wild in the city.

The first systematic lifestyle survey of odorous house ants confirms how much a modest country dweller can change habits in the big city, according to urban entomologist Grzegorz Buczkowski of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Grzegorz Buczkowski Received 2010 ESA NCB Recognition Award in Urban Entomology

Congratulations to Grzesiek Buczkowski who received the 2010 ESA NCB Recognition Award in Urban Entomology at the branch meeting awards banquet this week in Louisville, Kentucky. Grzesiek was recognized for his many accomplishments in urban entomology, particularly his research on urban ants.

Dr. Buczkowski's career in urban entomology spans over 12 years and begun in 1997 at Rhone-Poulenc Agricultural Company in Research Triangle Park where he performed pioneering work on fipronil bait for fire ant control.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Unusual sex chromosome creates third sex in Hessian fliesExpectant human parents might wish for a boy or girl, but Hessian flies actually have a third option, and, no matter what, the flies are never surprised by the sex of their offspring.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Common house ants form supercolonies, prosper in urban settings 

One of the most common house ant species might have been built for living in some of the smallest spaces in a forest, but the ants have found ways to take advantage of the comforts of city living.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Congratulations to Jeff Holland, Christian Krupke, and Doug Richmond!

Jeff, Christian and Doug has been granted tenure and promoted to Associate Professor. The Board of Trustees gave final approval for these promotions today. These promotions take effect on July 1st. Click on the title to see photos of Jeff, Christian and Doug receiving the good news from Dean Akridge.
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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
2 Purdue Entomology alumni win ESA awards

The following awards were presented at the ESA Pacific Branch Meeting in Boise, Idaho, April 11-14, 2010:

Larry D. Godfrey (BS '78, MS '80), an extention entomologist at the University of California, Davis, won the Distinguished Achievement Award in Extension.

 

 

Elizabeth E. Grafton-Cardwell (MS '80), an extension specialist at the University of California, Riverside, won the Recognition Award in Entomology.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Mirid Bug

Long-term ecological effects of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops on non-target pests have received limited attention, more so in diverse smallholder-based cropping systems of the developing world. Field trials conducted over 10 years in northern China show that mirid bugs (Heteroptera: Miridae) have progressively increased population levels and acquired pest status in cotton and multiple other crops, in association with a regional increase in Bt cotton adoption. More specifically, our analyses show that Bt cotton has become a source of mirid bugs and that their population increases are related to drops in insecticide use in this crop. Hence, alterations of pest management regimes in Bt cotton could be responsible for the appearance and subsequent spread of non-target pests at an agro-landscape level.

Read Full Abstract (PDF) >>

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Hessian Fly

Wheat plants found to be resistant to Hessian fly larvae may be calling in reinforcements to build up rigid defenses.

Christie Williams, a research scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and a Purdue University associate professor of entomology, found that resistant plants under attack by Hessian fly larvae increased production of surface waxes and cutin, a molecule responsible for rigidity and integrity of epidermal cells. In plants susceptible to the fly larvae, the genes thought to be responsible for cutin production were turned off - likely by the attacking larvae.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jake Rowland with the Tippecanoe County Health Department searches Tuesday for mosquito larvae at the county fairgrounds in Lafayette. The maturation process of a mosquito is five to 10 days. 

The itching and scratching levels aren't too high yet this year in Tippecanoe County.

Officials out monitoring mosquito activity in the area have not found excessive larvae colonies in the usual places.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bug Bowl 2010 Video

Experience Bug Bowl 2010 compressed into 3 minutes and 45 seconds for YouTube! Bug Bowl was filmed by Purdue Marketing and Media for its video news magazine telecast on the Big Ten Network. The clips assembled in this segment will also appear on the web as part of Purdue's viral marketing initiative. Savor the flavor of one of the most successful Bug Bowl events in its twenty year history! Check out some of the highlights here!

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Japanese beetles

A warmer than average spring could usher in some unwelcome visitors.

A Purdue insect expert is saying Japanese beetles could be arriving earlier than normal this summer.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Ralph Williams, Purdue University, prepares to examine some insects.Rebecca Miller of West Lafayette hates bugs, especially mosquitoes.


"For some odd reason they seem to be very attracted to me," the 37-year-old said. "I'm not a big fan of flies or wasps -- wasps because they can sting you and flies are just a nuisance."

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8/20/2014 3:26 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Head louse 

A Purdue University researcher hopes a better understanding of the neurological system of the body louse through the mapping of its genome will lead to better control or elimination of the human parasite.

Catherine Hill, an associate professor of entomology, with postdoctoral researchers Jason M. Meyer and Janice Pagel VanZee, and former undergraduate student Emily Krause contributed to the overall genome-mapping effort led by the University of Illinois and published online Monday (June 21) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The body louse genome is the smallest known genome of any insect, said University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, who led the drive to fund the project and coordinated the international team of scientists who analyzed the sequence.

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8/20/2014 3:26 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Kapil Raje 

Each year, ISS acknowledges a student(s) and a community volunteer for outstanding commitment to Purdue’s international students. Over the two weeks before classes begin, ISS processes nearly 2,000 incoming students. Our staff alone could not tackle this huge task without the help of our dedicated volunteers – this year nearly 130 -- who serve year after year helping new international students with the processing of documents, meeting arriving airport shuttles, explaining important information and providing a warm welcome.

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8/20/2014 3:26 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Mike Rowe, host of  

Purdue University graduate student Kristi Bugajski wants people to know that when she goes Dumpster diving for maggots on a Thursday afternoon, she is doing it for a good reason.

That's why Bugajski was thrilled to learn that she will soon be one of the Purdue entomologists featured on a popular reality show dedicated to the men and women who do the dirtiest work.

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8/20/2014 3:26 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
A Painted Lady butterfly is held during the 2009 Tippecanoe County Butterfly Encounter at Evonik, formerly the Eli Lilly Tippecanoe Laboratories Wildlife Habitat Recreation Area.

As the summer grows hotter, now is one of the best times to look for butterflies in Greater Lafayette.

A few favorite places to find butterflies include Prophetstown State Park, the Celery Bog in West Lafayette and the open fields along the Wabash Trail near the Tippecanoe Battlefield Monument in Battle Ground.

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8/20/2014 3:27 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
mosquito 

With heavy rains and flood warnings common this past month, mosquitoes have found a home in the standing waters that remain across Indiana.

Central Indiana normally has 4-5 inches of rain in June, but this year some areas have experienced twice that amount. Mosquitoes lay eggs in the standing water left from the storms, and soon their young will hatch.

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8/20/2014 3:27 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Larry Murdock and Rick Foster holding their plaques from the Indiana National Guard

Two Entomology professors, Rick Foster and Larry Murdock, participated in a training program for an Indiana National Guard agribusiness development team at Purdue University last week. The training prepared the team to work as Extension agents in Afghanistan.

The training included fieldwork at the Animal Science Research and Education Center at 5675 West 600 North, West Lafayette, and at the Meigs apple farm at the Throckmorton-Purdue Agricultural Center in southern Tippecanoe County.

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8/20/2014 3:28 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Butterfly EnCOUNTer 2010

Sitting in the shade of an outdoor shelter Saturday, Karen Arvin watched her young son, Severin, chase butterflies at Evonik Industries' Habitat Recreation Area in Lafayette.

"We homeschool, so it's nice to get them involved in this," said Arvin, of Indianapolis.

"It's educational and it's fun."
Arvin and members of her family -- 11 total -- were among the about 60 who showed up Saturday for the annual Butterfly Encounter, held by Purdue University's Department of Entomology and sponsored by Evonik.

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8/20/2014 3:29 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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On July 1, 2010, Steve Dlugosz, a Certified Crop Adviser and Lead Agronomist, Harvestland Cooperative presented testimony on behalf of the International Certified Crop Adviser (ICCA) Program and the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) to the House Agriculture Subcommittee on Conservation, Credit, Energy and Research in Washington, D.C. The committee was reviewing the administration and delivery of USDA conservation programs.

As Dlugosz said in his prepared remarks, the relationship between the CCA Technical Service Provider (TSP) and the local county level USDA NRCS staff is very critical to the successful delivery of conservation practices on the ground.

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8/20/2014 3:30 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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The Purdue Entomology Department released wasps in Fort Wayne Friday afternoon to fight the Emerald Ash Borer problem in the area.

The tiny wasps are fully grown adults and don’t have stingers, so they are incapable of stinging anyone.

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8/20/2014 3:31 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jeff Holland Goose Lake

Who would have dreamed that bog lemmings live at Goose Pond?

The small rodent is found in grassy openings in forests and forest edges, especially where sedges, ferns and shrubs grow, and not in corn and soybean fields. Somehow, the hardy little mammals survived a century of draining, plowing, row crops, pesticides, fertilizers and bulldozing during wetlands restoration.

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8/20/2014 3:32 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

West Lafayette is on the move as the newest representative for Indiana on the side of U-Haul equipment.

About 1,200 moving vans will feature the West Lafayette name, as well as a graphic of a firefly and a fact about the advancements made at Purdue University into research of the firefly's glow.

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8/20/2014 3:32 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Larry Bledsoe invasive species kudzu

Larry Bledsoe is spending his summer on the lookout for foreign invaders with wings and a penchant for destruction.

It isn’t easy. Among his tasks: venturing into the humid heat to lay traps laced with a sex pheromone engineered to attract a pesky species of moth known as the Old World bollworm.

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8/20/2014 3:33 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin Entomological Society of America ESA Fellow 

Congratulations to Tom Turpin who has been elected as a Fellow of the Entomological Society of America. Tom is being recognized for his outstanding contributions to insect outreach and science education.

Tom Turpin has been a creative force in entomology since his appointment as an assistant professor in 1971. His distinguished career as a scholar, a leader in his discipline, and one of the best teachers at Purdue was only the background for his nomination. Tom is arguably one of the best-known, accomplished, and effective public educators in the discipline because of his tireless efforts to bring the excitement of entomology as a discipline and insect science as a framework for science education to the general public in a fun and engaging manner.

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8/20/2014 3:34 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bill Hazeltine fellowship

Two entomology graduate students at UC Davis have received 2010 William Hazeltine Memorial Research Fellowship Awards to support their mosquito research -- one project involving a mosquito that transmits West Nile virus and the other, a mosquito that transmits malaria.

Tara Thiemann, a doctoral candidate studying with major professor William Reisen, received $2100 for her statewide research on bloodfeeding patterns of Culex mosquitoes. She studies both urban and rural populations of mosquitoes and their host meals.

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8/20/2014 3:34 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Chris Oseto, Purdue University

A4’s entomology training workshop for teaching faculty was held July 10-15 at Kabul University. Eighteen teachers were in attendance, comprising a group representing ten Afghanistan agricultural faculties countrywide including: Balkh, Bamyan, Ghazni, Herat, Kabul, Kandahar, Khost, Laghman, Nangarhar and Parwan Universities. Teachers in training received books, Powerpoint presentation copies and insect collection and mounting materials to be used when instructing heir own students at their respective universities. The workshop was conducted by Doctors Chris Oseto and Ricky Foster, professors at Purdue University’s Department of Entomology.

Insect taxonomy was the focus of the workshop that included an overview of the arthropods, how to collect, preserve and identify specimens and recognize agronomic pests. Between presentations and lab work, participants made outdoor excursions to capture and collect local insect fauna.
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8/20/2014 3:35 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jiaqi Guo SURF poster award

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program provides students across all engineering, science and technology disciplines with an intensive research experience, allowing them to work closely with graduate students and professors in their respective schools. The SURF 2010 program culminated with a two-day Research Symposium on August 3rd and 4th, where participants presented their summer research work either at technical (oral) sessions or poster sessions. Fifteen students were recognized for their outstanding oral or poster presentations including our own Jiaqi Guo who was recognized for having the best biology poster about “Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of Indiana Fireflies.” Jiaqi’s mentors for this project were Professors Virginia R. Ferris and Jeffery D. Holland.

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8/20/2014 3:35 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Linda Mason Associate Dean Graduate School 

Linda Mason, professor of entomology, has been named associate dean in Purdue's Graduate School. Mason will oversee Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR), new professional development activities, program assessment, program reviews, and other special initiatives.

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8/20/2014 3:36 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin with Rosie and Miss Boilerette

Purdue Day at the Indiana State Fair on Friday (Aug. 13) featured more than 50 tents and exhibits that included robotics competitions, animal surgery and the opportunity to race electric go-karts. In the photo, Miss Boilerette Rachael Bazzell looks apprehensive as Purdue entomologist Tom Turpin hands her a tarantula during the Bugs, Beetles and Bees presentation on the Purdue Live stage.

To view a photo gallery of the day's events, to go: http://purdue.photoshelter.com/gallery/State-Fair-2010/G0000e8BuDU1_aE4/

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8/20/2014 3:36 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Kathy Heinsohn on the cover of Pest Management Professional Magazine

After serving as the National Pest Management Association's senior entomologist for the past 4.5 years, Kathy Heinsohn returns to the field as a technical and training entomologist with American Pest.

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8/20/2014 3:40 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jodie Ellis and Perry Schnarr tie a purple card with information about the eab around an ash tree 

For those who don't know what ash trees look like, they just got a little easier to identify in one Lafayette neighborhood.


Volunteers and entomology experts from Purdue teamed up Tuesday night to put purple tags on ash trees in the McAllister/St. Lawrence neighborhood on the city's north side.

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8/20/2014 3:40 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Soybean cyst nematode intensifies Sudden Death Syndrome and brown stem rot. The mechanism for these synergies isn’t yet understood.

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) and soybean cyst nematode (SCN) bring out the worst in each other. “When the two are together, disease severity tends to be much stronger,” says Anne Dorrance, Ohio State University plant pathologist.

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8/20/2014 3:41 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Please welcome our newest Entomology graduate students!

Front row (from left to right):  Julie Speelman (PhD, Jeff Holland), Madeline Spigler (MS, Christian Krupke), Vianney Willot (PhD, Christian Krupke), Amanda Pendleton (Student Services), Jonathan Nixon (MS, Rick Foster), Joseph Braasch (MS, Ian Kaplan) and Lucio Navarro Escalante (PhD, Jeff Stuart).

Back row:  Nicole Parker (MS, Christian Krupke), Jeffrey Grabowski (PhD, Cate Hill), Marwa Farouk Kamel Aly (Visiting Scientist), Serena Gross (PhD, Ralph Williams), Gina Angelella (PhD, Ian Kaplan) and Linda Mason (Graduate Committee Chair).
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Dr. Michael McManus will receive the 2010 George Varley Award for Excellence in Forest Insect Research at the upcoming International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) meeting in Eberswalde, Germany September 12 – 16, 2010. This award recognizes outstanding Forest Entomologists, both for their scientific accomplishments and their contributions to IUFRO.

Dr. McManus is being recognized for his many accomplishments over his career, including his research on forest insect biology, but also his work in facilitating international cooperation, including his work as an IUFRO leader. George Varley, for whom the award is named, was a well-known insect population ecologist who was also the first leader of an entomology group in IUFRO during the 1950s.

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8/20/2014 3:43 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Bedbugs seem to be making a comeback nationwide, but experts say there is no need to panic.

"There is no question there are more bedbugs than 20 years ago," said Purdue entomologist Tom Turpin.  "I've only been bitten once, when I was in Africa years ago. I don't remember it itching quite as long as chigger bites."

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8/20/2014 3:44 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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University of Florida researchers have isolated two enzymes termites use to break up lignin, a tough plant material that is major problem during the production of cellulosic ethanol.

Termite spit may soon help fill our gas tanks. University of Florida researchers have isolated two enzymes termites use to break up lignin, a tough plant material that is major problem during the production of cellulosic ethanol.

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8/20/2014 3:45 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Bobby Corrigan, president of RMC Pest Management Consulting, Richmond, Ind., authored the August PCT feature Biomonitoring for Rodents, which examined how non-toxic rodent monitoring bait blocks can help bolster IPM programs, reduce callbacks and provide another dimension of service.

Corrigan provides additional insights on this topic and also discusses some of his recent rodent work in New York City in the following podcast.

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The large amount of small moths on Midwestern lawns lately are nothing to worry about, says a Purdue University entomologist.

“They are alarming because they look much like the European corn borer, but they are actually grass moths,” Timothy Gibb says. “They are called celery leaf-tiers and normally are very minor pests to many plants.”

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An odd looking moth was found flying around Lafayette and had some wondering if it was an insect from Africa.

Gaye Martin found the unique-looking moth near her Lafayette business. She said she has never seen one like it before, which prompted her to do some research. That research lead her to believe the moth's origin was from Africa.

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Eileen Luke and Mike Hill of The Center for Environmental and Regulatory Information Systems (CERIS) have received the 2010 National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Partnership Award for Innovative Program Models.

This team award recognizes the tremendous efforts and accomplishments of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) since its inception in 2002. The NPDN is a collection of Land Grant University plant disease and pest diagnostic facilities from across the United States. The National Repository, maintained by CERIS, contains diagnostic information uploaded from five regions. This project is a cooperative effort with NIFA and several land grant universities.

The nomination was sponsored by Dr. Neal Van Alfen, Dean of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of California-Davis.

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“In most cultures outside of North America and Western Europe, tiny many-legged creatures are a delicacy, and an important source of protein,” Jeff Gordinier writes in a report on a five-course Mexican feast featuring insect cuisine last Saturday in Brooklyn. “Here in the United States they represent the growing realm of gastronomic spelunking.” For omnivores who want to take it to the next level, Tom Turpin, a professor of entomology at Purdue University, offers information on three common bugs you can easily buy, prepare and cook.

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8/20/2014 3:47 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tagged ash tree 

The dreaded emerald ash borer has been found along the Monon Trail in Nora, in Sahm Park and at Castleton Square Mall.

This bug from China, discovered in Michigan in 2002, has felled millions of ash trees, with the highest concentration in Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Ontario. The bug kills any species of native ash trees within three to five years of infestation.

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8/20/2014 3:48 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
NCUE logo

On May 16, 2010, urban entomologists from around the country gathered in Portland, Ore., at the DoubleTree Hotel for the 12th National Conference on Urban Entomology (NCUE). Representation from academia, industry, government (state and national) and private consultants were present. The following three days were packed with presentations covering a wide variety of topics relating to urban entomology. More than 200 individuals attended the meeting, and a total of 102 papers were presented covering a wide variety of urban entomology topics. The overall number of presentations was up this year from the last meeting, which was held in 2008 in Tulsa, OK.

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8/20/2014 3:48 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Hessian fly

Bugs have a bad rep—and for good reason.

There’s the gross factor: They’re creepy and crawly and show up in places we don’t want them.

There’s the fear factor: Many of them sting and bite, and often are on us before we even know it.

And there’s the destruction factor: They transmit diseases such as malaria, West Nile virus and Lyme disease, they damage homes and other structures, and they consume crop plants.

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8/20/2014 3:49 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Department of Entomology logo

More than half of Purdue University’s 46 programs included in a national evaluation of doctoral programs in the United States are highly rated in their respective disciplines.

The National Research Council report, released Tuesday (Sept. 28), evaluated and ranked programs using a 5th and 95th percentile range. Twenty-five Purdue programs are in the top 20 in the 5th percentile, and seven are in the top 20 in the 95th percentile.

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8/20/2014 3:49 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Crime scene investigation is more than just the subject of the popular CSI series of television programs, it also is the subject of a wildly popular Purdue course, Entomology 218, Introduction to Forensic Science.

Now, thanks to an ITaP project to retool courses for distance learning, this fall students can get Entomology 218 in their own homes just like the CSI TV shows—or anywhere else with a computer and Web access.

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8/20/2014 3:50 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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Ernest Richman age 89, passed away peacefully on August 23, 2010 at his residence in Tucson, Arizona. He was born on May 11, 1921, to the late Isaac and Chassa Richman in New York City.

He was predeceased by his brother, Harry Richman of New Rochelle, New York. He is survived by his devoted wife of 65 years, Dorothy (Dolly) Miller Richman; sons, Dr. Lawrence Richman (Harriet) of Bath, Ohio and Dr. Eric Richman (Vivian) of Wooster, Ohio; daughters, Barbara Jagolinzer (Rabbi Marc) of Portsmouth, Rhode Island and Susan Meyers (Martin) of Livingston, New Jersey; grandchildren, Katherine Salkin (Aaron) of Canton, Massachusetts, Deborah Sheftel (Laurence) of Alpharetta, Georgia, Robert Richman of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Jessica Dworkin (Matthew) of Columbus, Ohio, Amy Malk (David) of River Woods, Illinois, Charles Jagolinzer (Rachelle) of San Diego, California, Sarah Jagolinzer of Washington, D.C., Jonathan Jagolinzer of Alexandria, Virginia and Andrew and Diana Meyers of Livingston, New Jersey. He was a great-grandfather to Brayden James Salkin, Max Jacob, Joseph Phineas and Noah Benjamin Sheftel, Jackson Richman and Makenzie Rey Malk and Max Ethan Jagolinzer.

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8/20/2014 3:51 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Photo contest

Who's eligible: All Entomology faculty, staff and student

Photo categories:

  • Aesthetic/General
  • Informational (scientific or extension)
  • Microscope
  • Photo Art (photoshopped, collage, photo base art)

Limit submissions for each category to your best 3 photos. Submit to one or all four categories!

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8/20/2014 3:51 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Cowpea Storage Project

Balarabe Kausani, a smallholder farmer in northern Nigeria, is earning enough money to make improvements to his home, install an irrigation system on his farm, and pay school fees for his four children.

The secret to his success? A bag.

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8/20/2014 3:52 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
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A bug named for its stench and marbled, streaky appearance has made its way to Indiana, potentially becoming a serious pest for homeowners and fruit growers.

An insect the Purdue Plant & Pest Diagnostic Laboratory received from a homeowner in Elkhart County in northern Indiana on Tuesday (Oct. 19) was confirmed to be the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys. It is the first record of the bug in Indiana, but it has been found in Ohio and Kentucky.

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8/20/2014 3:52 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
2010 Ohio Valley Entomological Association Winners

A team of 5 students and 1 faculty member from the Department traveled to Columbus, Ohio to compete in the Twenty Third Annual Forum of the Ohio Valley Entomological Association (OVEA) on October 29th. Seventeen students from 4 different universities and one high school took part in the competition. Purdue gave 5 presentations and came home with 2 awards for current students, and 2 awards for alumni (see below for detail). A complete account the event will be posted on the OVEA website. A special thanks to Linda Mason who coordinates our participation in OVEA, and to all the advisors who encouraged their students to participate and helped them prepare and practice their presentations. A photo of the Purdue winners is attached.

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8/20/2014 3:53 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jiaqi Guo | Winner 2010 ESE Symposium Poster Contest

The Ecological Sciences and Engineering (ESE) Symposium, a student-run, interdisciplinary event, provides undergraduate and graduate students with an opportunity to present their research and interact with experts in various environmental fields. It also raises awareness about the ESE program and other environmentally focused initiatives at Purdue University and beyond. This year’s symposium, Bridging the Gap from Science to Policy: Technology, Envioronment and Sustainable Development, took place on October 27. Jiaqi Guo, an undergraduate in the Department of Entomology, won first prize for her poster titled "Molecular Study of Fireflies, an Integral Part of the Indiana Landscape".

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8/20/2014 3:53 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Mike Scharf

Dr. Mike Scharf, O. Wayne Rollins/Orkin Chair in Molecular Physiology and Urban Entomology, Department of Entomology. Dr. Scharf earned his bachelor's degree in entomology, a master's in urban entomology and a doctorate in insect toxicology/urban entomology, all from Purdue. He comes to Purdue from the University of Florida, where he had been on the faculty since 2004.

Dr. Scharf is interested in adaptations in insects that drive evolutionary divergence, particularly those with real-world significance in pest management. He has developed a nationally recognized program in molecular insect physiology that features toxicology, gene identification and cloning, development and metamorphosis, and cellulosics.

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8/20/2014 3:54 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Armyworm

Dry conditions are likely to continue through the early part of winter and one Purdue University entomologist says crop insect pests will probably survive the mild season.

Most of the crop pests in Indiana have been around for a long time," said Christian Krupke. "They are well-equipped to cope with weather changes and they can withstand a wide range."

Indiana is located in a region where both temperature and precipitation can swing widely above and below average, said associate state climatologist Ken Scheeringa. But, with the current weather pattern and little precipitation expected until late winter, insect pests might not have to cope with too many extreme conditions.

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8/20/2014 3:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs at Purdue

Purdue's forensic entomology program will be featured on Discovery Channel's reality television show "Dirty Jobs" at 9 p.m. Nov. 28. The episode, titled "Bug Detective," highlights the work of graduate students who study forensic entomology as they collect and analyze insects from dead pigs to determine time of death and other information about crime scene scenarios.

For more information on "Dirty Jobs" and additional times that "Bug Detective" will air, visit http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/dirty-jobs.

For more information on Purdue's Forensic Entomology program, visit http://extension.entm.purdue.edu/Forensics/.

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8/20/2014 3:58 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Rick Foster accepts 2010 PUCESA Career Award

Rick Foster was awarded the 2010 Purdue Cooperative Extension Specialists' Association (PUCESA) Career Award in recognition of his 21-year tenure as Purdue's Fruit/Vegetable Extension Entomologist. His efforts have improved our understanding about the biology and ability to manage key pests by challenging traditional treatment levels that reduced applications of pesticide without sacrificing produce quality.

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8/20/2014 3:59 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Kurt Saltzmann speaks at a pest management conference about bed bugsBedbugs 

Bed bugs are a growing problem in North America, and some experts say a new solution is needed now.  The concern is that bed bugs can spread easily, and they are extremely difficult to get rid of once they're inside a home.

Mark Grisold is a supervisor technician with Marshall Pest Control, he says "The numbers coming in are increasing all the time, the problem seems to be spreading."  According to the company, bed bug-related calls are up at least 30 per cent from 2009, and customers are grossed out.

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8/20/2014 4:00 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jeff Grabowski

First year PULSe student, Jeff Grabowski, has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship to support his Ph.D. research. Jeff will use the award to study tick-borne flaviviruses. Ticks transmit a number of viruses worldwide. Tick-borne viral diseases cause significant human morbidity and mortality, and affect thousands of people every year.

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8/20/2014 4:01 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Mike Scharf 

Michael Scharf has been appointed as the first O. Wayne Rollins/Orkin Endowed Chair in Urban Entomology at Purdue University.

The appointment was announced Tuesday (Nov. 30) by Steve Yaninek, head of the entomology department.

"Dr. Scharf’s accomplishments represent the complete package as a scholar who works on cutting-edge questions to address real-world problems," Yaninek said. "He is an envoy the pest management industry knows and trusts and an academic ready to educate the next generation of scientists."

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8/20/2014 4:02 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Western Bean Cutworm

The Entomological Society of America (ESA) has just released the first issue of its newest periodical, Journal of Integrated Pest Management (JIPM), which is available online for free. JIPM is an online-only, open-access, peer-reviewed extension journal that covers the field of integrated pest management. The intended readership for the journal is any professional who is engaged in any aspect of integrated pest management, including, but not limited to, crop producers, individuals working in crop protection, retailers, manufacturers and suppliers of pest management products, educators, and pest control operators.

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8/20/2014 4:02 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Michael Miesch Jr. and wife Ann in front of Paris Junior College Academic Hall of Honor Award
Dr. Michael Miesch Jr. and wife Ann in front of Paris Junior College Academic Hall of Honor Award. Paris Junior College is in Paris, Texas with a student body of about 6,000.

The Paris Junior College Academic Hall of Honor inducted six honorees for the Class of 2010 at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 13, in the McLemore Student Center Ballroom. These graduates and former students were honored during a weekend of PJC Homecoming festivities.

After a welcome by PJC President Dr. Pamela Anglin, Vice President of Academics Dwight Chaney delivered a history of the Hall of Honor. Then the honorees were introduced.

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8/20/2014 4:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Two Hessian flies on a piece of wheat.
Two Hessian flies on a piece of wheat. (Purdue Agricultural Communication photo/Tom Campbell)

Many of the genes that allow wheat to ward off Hessian flies are no longer effective in the southeastern United States, and care should be taken to ensure that resistance genes that so far haven't been utilized in commercial wheat lines are used prudently, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture and Purdue University scientists.

An analysis of wheat lines carrying resistance genes from dozens of locations throughout the Southeast showed that some give little or no resistance to the Hessian fly, a major pest of wheat that can cause millions of dollars in damage to wheat crops each year. Others, even those considered the most effective, are allowing wheat to become susceptible to the fly larvae, which feed on and kill the plants.

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8/20/2014 3:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Western Bean Cutworm

Congratulations to John Mumford (BS '74) who will be recognized as one of eight Distinguished Ag Alumni in 2011.

The award ceremony is scheduled for April 1st, 2011 so mark you calendars. Details will follow.

View full list of awardees >>

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8/20/2014 4:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Afghan university and Ministry of Higher Education officials discussed ways that their country's universities could advance as they met in Indianapolis this week, but they said they needed well-considered help from international partners

Western universities can play a crucial role in rebuilding war-torn Afghanistan but must make sure they listen to local needs and connect with the government's education plan, said Afghan higher-education officials at a conference here.

The meeting, which was organized by Ball State University and sponsored by Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and the U.S. State Department, brought together university and government leaders to discuss ways to strengthen ties between North American and Afghan higher-education institutions.

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8/20/2014 4:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Steve Yaninek

There have been several additions and changes to the CAST (Council for Agricultural Science and Technology) Board. Iowa Soybean Association is our most recent nonprofit member joining the board, and American Association of Bovine Practitioners joined last fall. In addition, there have been several new appointees to replace representatives who have moved to new positions with the Board of Directors, or who have finished their terms.

Please join me in welcoming the newest members of the CAST Board of Representatives!

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8/20/2014 4:09 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Advanced Forensics class using new DoubleTake iPhone app

A mobile application that allows Purdue University students to submit videos to fulfill classroom assignments is now available from the Apple iTunes App Store and as a website.

DoubleTake is available to Purdue students and staff and will eventually be made available to other institutions.

"Our goal is to make videos as easy to use in the classroom as traditional papers," says Kyle Bowen, director of informatics for Information Technology at Purdue.

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8/20/2014 4:10 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Fincannon's video of Dr. Seuss product placement

A short film by David W. Fincannon describing how Ted Geisel (Dr. Seuss) used product placement in his advertising cartoons to provide enough income to continue his cartoonist career. Some consider this the first time humor was used to sell a product. Geisel's birthday is March 2.

View the video.

 
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8/20/2014 4:10 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
2011 ESA NCB Winners from Purdue

President Rick Foster presided over the 66th Annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America North Central Branch in Minneapolis this week. The meetings featured 8 symposia, 141 paper presentations, and 66 poster presentations. Final registration totaled 345, an increase of more than 100 from the previous year’s meeting.

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8/20/2014 4:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin - Purdue Entomology

Purdue students dressed as giant butterflies and mosquitoes are flying into elementary classrooms to teach about entomology.

The group responsible is Purdue Science Theater Outreach, spearheaded by professor Tom Turpin. The idea for the group began last semester when he collaborated with education professor Marcia Gentry to instruct HONR 299, "Science, Education, and Theater: Inspiring Children and Their Teachers." As part of class assignments, students researched, directed and performed an original play, "The Insecta Class Yearbook," for fifth-graders. Following the class' success, Turpin decided to organize a formal Purdue group whose members will participate in the same activities.

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8/20/2014 4:11 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
John Mumford

The College of Agriculture will present its highest honor, the Distinguished Agriculture Alumni Award, to eight recipients during a campus ceremony April 1.

"These eight people represent who we are and what we do so well," said Jay Akridge, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Agriculture. "They are businesspeople, educators and researchers working in both the public and private sectors, and they are all leaders. We take great pride in our alumni, and these are eight of our best."

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8/20/2014 4:12 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Marvin Green

Teacher and coach of 43 Entomology State Championships since 1962, a run of 27 consecutive championships to 2008! An impressive legacy for Marvin Green and Oak Hill Entomology teams through the years. The dynamics of a winning dynasty often produce those factors that can work against you with changing eligibility and contest requirements that, at times, seem designed to "level the playing field". In each case, Green coached teams responded to the new challenge and asserted their proven tradition of success.

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8/20/2014 4:19 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Marvin Green

Purdue University's efforts to help war-torn Afghanistan improve the capabilities of its agricultural universities enter a second phase with an agreement for $32 million in additional funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development. 

The Strengthening Afghan Agriculture Faculties agreement, announced Monday (April 4), is a five-year grant to continue and expand the work Purdue initiated under the USAID-funded Advancing Afghan Agriculture Alliance, known as A4. Purdue received $7 million in funding under A4, which ended March 31.

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8/20/2014 4:20 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jonathan Neal accepting his award

The College of Agriculture held it's spring teaching awards program on Friday (Apr 8). In addition to the information already circulated in the department (see below), we had two other nominees in the department to recognize.

Doug Richmond – Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching
Jeff Holland – Early Career Award

Congratulations to Doug and Jeff!

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8/20/2014 4:20 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Rick Foster

Celebrate the success of the Purdue Afghanistan Team, winner of the 2011 Purdue Agriculture TEAM Award on Wednesday, April 27, 2011. The ceremony will be from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. in the Pfendler Hall Dean's Auditorium.

The Team consists of the following members:

Rick Foster, Entomology
Ned E. Kalb, International Programs in Agriculture
James M. Lowenberg-DeBoer, International Programs in Agriculture
Kevin T. McNamara, Agriculture Economics & International Programs in Agriculture
Jerry L. Peters, Youth Development and Agricultural Education
George E. Van Scoyoc, Agronomy

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8/20/2014 4:21 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
2 women learn to use PICS bag to store cowpeas during a demonstration in Ghana 

Purdue University will receive $1.1 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to determine whether a storage technology developed for cowpeas and now widely used by farmers in sub-Saharan Africa will work for other African crops.

The award builds on the $11.8 million Gates-funded project called Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage, or PICS, which began in 2007. It found that hermetic storage of the staple cowpea, known in America as the black-eyed pea, was practical and profitable for African farmers and ensured a supply of the nutritious legume for many months after harvest. Without the storage, farmers would have to sell their cowpeas immediately after harvest when the price is lowest or treat them with sometimes dangerous insecticides.

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8/20/2014 4:21 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Ron and Mary Bitner

It is my pleasure to announce that Dr. Ron Bitner (MS ‘70) has been selected to receive the 2011 John V. Osmun Alumni Professional Achievement Award in Entomology.

Dr. Bitner received his B.S. degree from the College of Idaho, his M.S. in Entomology from Purdue University, and his Ph.D. in Entomology from Utah State University. He has been president of Pollination and Pest Management Consulting Services since 1981. Services include IPM programs for alfalfa seed, orchard crops and vineyards.

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8/20/2014 4:22 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dying ash tree, effects of emerald ash borer 

Purdue Extension has begun a summerlong program to help homeowners manage ash trees in their yards as the emerald ash borer continues its destructive path through Indiana.

Purdue’s Neighbors Against Bad Bugs, a collaboration among Purdue Master Gardeners, city foresters and neighborhood groups, has declared this season "The Summer of NABB."

NABB participants will organize tree-tagging events at the request of neighborhood associations so that homeowners and communities can learn where their ash trees are and whatthey need to do before the ash borer arrives in their area. NABB also will help neighbors learn how to save money by negotiating with tree care companies for group rates on the cost of treatments and, if a tree is dying from infestation, removal.

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8/20/2014 4:23 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jon Foster examines a beehive frame Thursday. He and his father, Ken Foster, keep about 50 hives on the family’s Lafayette property and sell honey to neighbors and local stores. / (By Jordan Kartholl/Journal & Courier)

Off a wooden fence post, a black sign juts out. "Honey for Sale," it reads in yellow letters with a bee between the first two words.

Down the gravel driveway and over a makeshift plywood bridge on a small creek is what beekeeper Ken Foster nicknamed one of his "bee yards."

Foster, a third-generation beekeeper, along with his son, Jon, monitor the bees weekly now that the weather is warm. They look to prevent swarming, where the bees leave to create a new hive, and to make sure as many bees as possible are free of disease and healthy.

"The secret to honey production is a large population," Foster said.

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3/15/2012 9:17 PMMoore, Marilyn
Pest Management Professional May 2011

All types of ants have been persistent pests to humankind since well before the Bible was written, and they remain so today. But knowing more about each major ant species and embracing tools and techniques proven to provide long-term control will help you conquer the mighty pest ant. Identification, best management practices and using the correct tools in the correct manner at the correct time are three keys to eradicating ant infestations most effectively and cost efficiently.

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8/20/2014 4:25 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Luke Jacobus

Luke M. Jacobus (BS '00, PhD '06) is the Laboratory and Personnel Manager at the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center in the Department of Biology at Indiana University.

To listen to this interview from the WJR 760 AM website >>click here.
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8/20/2014 4:25 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Alternate text to describe the picture goes here

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - The interaction between a Hessian fly's saliva and the wheat plant it is attacking may be the key to whether the pest eats like a king or dies like a starving pauper, according to a study done at Purdue University.

"The insect induces or suppresses susceptibility in the plant," said Christie Williams, a research scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and a Purdue associate professor of entomology. "It's not that the fly larva is making holes and retrieving nutrients as once thought. The larva is doing something chemically to change the plant."

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8/20/2014 4:27 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Neal Haskell testifies during the trial of Casey Anthony. (By Joe Burbank/AP)

In 1981, Neal Haskell was planting corn on his 800-acre family farm in Rensselaer when the police rolled up.  Haskell knew the lawmen, since he was a special deputy for the Jasper County Sheriff's Department.  But what they were asking of the farmer, or the "bug guy," as he was known, was in a whole new realm at the time.

"This was no joke. They had a body with insects on it," Haskell said Wednesday. "They wanted to see if I would go out to the morgue so we could figure out how long the body had been (dead) by what insects were on it. And I thought, well, I will give it a try."

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8/20/2014 4:28 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Adam Salyer

Pi Chi Omega, the national professional pest management fraternity, has awarded three $2,000 scholarships. The Scholarship Committee selected the following students for this fiscal year.  The scholarships will be awarded to:

Amanda L. Eiden, Ph.D. student, University of Florida

Adam Salyer, M.S student, Purdue University

Mark H. Goodman, Ph.D. student, University of Kentucky

Goodman, a repeat recipient, receives the newly created Pi Chi Omega- Dr. Austin Frishman Scholarship. made possible by special contribution mainly by former students of Dr. Frishman. The scholarship checks will be mailed out before the end of June 2011.
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8/20/2014 4:30 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin

On evenings such as these, the soft flashes rise from fields and wetlands. They glow from the sides of country roads. And from backyards, children play catch and release.

Fireflies. A sure sign of an Indiana summer.

Through the years, fireflies have made history in the state. A new species was named in New Harmony in 1824. Researchers at Purdue University studied the chemistry of firefly flashes in the 1980s. A bill to make it the state insect was brought to the Statehouse in 1997 but never reached the governor's desk.
So what is it about these glowing beetles that fascinates Indiana? Perhaps it's because no matter the age, Hoosiers can relate.

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8/20/2014 4:34 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
ash borer flier 

Metro-area residents are bracing for an invasion by a pest that is now on Indianapolis' doorstep after having already killed nearly a third of the state's ash trees.

Hancock County is one of four new Indiana counties where the emerald ash borer's presence has been confirmed. Since it was first spotted in the northeastern part of Indiana in 2004, the destructive beetle has now made a home in 42 counties -- nearly half of the state -- the Indiana Department of Natural Resources said Tuesday.

 

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8/20/2014 4:35 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bees

Dan Cassens has put a lot of time and money into his 20-acre Christmas tree farm in Lafayette.

It takes about seven years for a Christmas tree to mature, meaning that if something goes wrong this season, such as a wayward drift of chemical herbicides from a nearby farm, Cassens might be out of business.

"I've got a lot of money invested per acres because I have a lot of trees per acre," Cassens said. "A lot of folks don't recognize the value that's there."
That's why when Cassens learned of Drift Watch, a collaborative network of growers and chemical application companies to prevent chemical drift, he signed right up.

 

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8/20/2014 4:36 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bob Gallun

Robert L. Gallun, 87, of Westminster Village in West Lafayette, died at 6:59 p.m. Friday, June 24, 2011, at St. Elizabeth Central hospital.

He was born Feb. 21, 1924, in Milwaukee, Wis., the son of the late George and Viola Paul Gallun. He was a World War II Army veteran, serving in the 104th Infantry Division "The Timberwolves," and served as the company bugler.

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8/20/2014 4:37 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Larry Murdock

A Purdue University professor, whose research has already helped provide food for 3.4 million households in sub-Saharan Africa, is now enhancing his efforts, hoping to make even greater contributions to battle hunger. Larry Murdock, a professor of entomology at Purdue's College of Agriculture, has developed a new method of storing cowpeas—a staple in sub-Saharan Africa—that has greatly reduced the region's crippling loss of the crop due to poor storage techniques. Having proven the technology with cowpea storage, Murdock is focusing his efforts on other crops that could bring additional value to farmers and help feed millions more.

The five-year Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) project was launched in 2007, funded by a nearly $12 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Now in its fourth year, the project recently received a second dose of funding to focus on other crops.

 

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8/20/2014 4:38 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
scharf-termites

One of the peskiest household pests, while disastrous to homes, could prove to be a boon for cars, according to a Purdue University study.

Mike Scharf, the O. Wayne Rollins/Orkin Chair in Molecular Physiology and Urban Entomology, said his laboratory has discovered a cocktail of enzymes from the guts of termites that may be better at getting around the barriers that inhibit fuel production from woody biomass. The Scharf Laboratory found that enzymes in termite guts are instrumental in the insects' ability to break down the wood they eat.

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8/20/2014 4:38 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Lisa Pantea, from left, Gladys Andino and Deb Hester look at a Pearl Crescent they caught Saturday during the annual butterfly count at Prophetstown State Park in Battle Ground. (By Brent Drinkut/Journal & Courier) 
Angela Myracle knew the butterfly she found at Prophetstown State Park on Saturday was either a Common Sootywing or a Horace's Duskywing.

Using a photo she took with her camera, Myracle and Purdue graduate student Carmen Baugh consulted an illustrated guidebook to find the answer. It was a Common Sootywing, which is dark with white spots.  "That was the only one I was able to get a picture of," said Myracle, a grad student at the University of Illinois and Purdue alumna.

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8/20/2014 4:39 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Hornworms, a common garden pest, can defoliate tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and other vegetables. (Purdue Agriculture photo/Rick Foster) 

Now that the weather is getting warmer, gardeners should be on the lookout for hornworms and other garden pests, says a Purdue Extension insect specialist.

Tomato and tobacco hornworms are the caterpillars of two large moths that fly in June. Easily identified by their protruding "horn," hornworms grow to four inches long and can destroy foliage and eat on the green fruit, Rick Foster said. 

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8/20/2014 4:40 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Alternate text to describe the picture goes here

Six people from the Holland lab at Purdue Entomology took part in a Bioblitz in Michigan City, Indiana, hosted by the Indiana Academy of Science and Weaver-Boos Consulting.

Jeff Holland, Insu Koh, John Shukle, Alex Bic, Tommy Mager, and Kyle and Molly Schnepp collected insects at various parks and natural areas in the city for 24 hours (with a short break 6-10 AM) on the July 15-16 weekend. Sweep nets, pitfall traps, and 2.4 kW of lights were used to rapidly sample as many beetle species as possible in the 24 hour period. Other teams worked on surveying other taxa of animals, plants, and fungi.

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8/20/2014 4:40 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Eric Smith

Dr. Eric Smith, director of technical services with Dodson Pest Control, Lynchburg, Va., reviews this invasive species that is becoming problematic, particularly in mid-Atlantic states.

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8/20/2014 4:44 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
David Fincannon

A video from Fincannon, A-All Pest Termite Exterminators, in which Fincannon discusses fee increases proposed by the Texas Department of Agriculture.   

157 No
  
8/20/2014 4:46 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.

This is one of three panels of an exhibit on how to stop bed bugs from spreading and eliminate them. The exhibit is one of several from Purdue University that will be in on display in the Pioneer Hi-Bred Our Land Pavilion during the Indiana State Fair. (Purdue Agricultural Communication illustration) 

Educational displays about bed bugs, grain bin safety and how veterinary medicine can advance human health will be featured among Purdue University exhibits at the Indiana State Fair Aug. 5-21ducational displays about bed bugs, grain bin safety and how veterinary medicine can advance human health will be featured among Purdue University exhibits at the Indiana State Fair Aug. 5-21.

They are among other activities, including analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's August crop production report, Purdue Day and recognition of outstanding women in agriculture, which will involve Purdue Agriculture during the run of the fair. 

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158 No
  
8/20/2014 4:48 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Joao Pedra 

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Summer for most people means time spent outdoors, which could also mean increased exposure to bugs and, possibly, arthropod-borne diseases, such as “rickettsial diseases” – infectious diseases spread by bacteria, which, generally, are transmitted by lice, fleas, ticks and mites.

Now a $1.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will enable an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside to study how our immune system responds to rickettsial infection.

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159 No
  
8/20/2014 4:48 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin (Purdue University Department of Entomology)

Friday, August 12 was Purdue Day at the Indiana State Fair and it was a beautiful day for the cricket-spitting along State Fair Boulevard and for the roach races in the Our Land Pavilion. There was huge turnout of Boilermakers from across campus for the festivities. I was joined by volunteers Larry Bledsoe, Mahsa Fardisi, John Obermeyer, Arwin Provonsha, and Tom Turpin. Larry and Mahsa worked together to measure distances, I organized registration, John did double duty as photographer and announcer and Tom “hawked” our event (no pun intended!) to visitors passing by. We had a wide variety of spitters, aged 4-72, stop by to participate in the event. The morning and afternoon roach races, emceed by Arwin, were also very well attended.

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160 No
  
8/20/2014 4:49 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Larry Murdock 

Tricks that prevent the rotting of cowpeas, an African staple, after they have been harvested, will have yielded US$295 million of benefits in west and central Africa by 2020, according to new research.

Solar powered heaters to kill pests, simple, airtight containers and other storage technologies developed between 1982 and 2007 through the Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program (CRSP), are having a dramatic impact on production of the bean (Vigna unguiculata), an important source of protein in semi-arid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa, the study has shown.

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161 No
  
8/20/2014 4:50 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Photo: By John Terhune/Journal & Courier 

The size of a sesame seed as an adult, the tiny black-legged tick can pose a major health threat. It can transmit the bacterium that causes Lyme disease to humans.  If left untreated, the disease can cause painful joint swelling or more rarely a neurological disorder such as meningitis or Bell's palsy, loss of muscle tone on one or more sides of the face.

"Chances of transmission are pretty slim but still the consequences of the disease are serious enough that we've got to be careful about it," said Timothy Gibb, an entomologist with Purdue University. "It's prudent for people to use discretion as much as possible to prevent it."

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162 No
  
8/20/2014 4:51 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jeff Stuart 

Lanham, MD; September 1, 2011 – The votes from the 2012 ESA Officers Election have been counted and the new officers have been selected for ESA national offices and for ESA Sections. In addition, the ESA membership has selected four new Honorary Members, and has approved of three amendments to the ESA Bylaws.

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163 No
  
8/20/2014 4:53 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Douglas Richmond 

September 6, 2011 - WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - The right combination of compounds produced by a beneficial fungus could lead to grasses that require fewer pesticides and are safer for wildlife and grazing animals, according to Purdue University scientists.

Neotyphodium is a fungus called an endophyte. It lives symbiotically, feeding off many species of grasses while providing the grass with protection from insects such as black cutworm. But Neotyphodium also can be toxic to animals based on the types of alkaloids it produces. It was once a serious concern for pasture managers.

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164 No
  
8/20/2014 4:53 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Christian Krupke 

An experienced group of 13 U.S. and Canadian entomologists has issued an unmistakenly stern warning that a recently approved procedure for simultaneously planting mixtures of genetically modified (GM) and conventional crop seeds could trigger several unforeseen and less than desirable outcomes. The method is a newer twist on providing an in-field refuge for susceptible insects in transgenic insecticidal crop plantings.

The group, headed by D.W. Onstad on the faculty of the Univ. of Illinois, concluded that a process to establish refuges in GM crops using seed mixtures, dubbed by some 'refuge-in-a-bag,' will result in making "pest monitoring more difficult." Seed mixtures also may, in the group's view, "make IRM (insect-resistance management) riskier because of larval behavior and greater adoption of insecticidal corn."

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165 No
  
8/20/2014 4:54 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Jeff Stuart 

Dr. Jeff Stuart, Entomology, has taken on a new role in International Programs in Agriculture (IPIA), where he is supporting Purdue Agriculture’s education, research and extension efforts in Latin America.

Earlier this month, he traveled with Dean Jay Akridge to the Universidad del Rosario in Bogotá, Colombia, for a strategic workshop with the highest levels of the Colombian government and other key players to focus on innovation strategies for Colombia.
 
He will be traveling to Brazil in October for discussions with leadership from the Federal University of Vicosa (UFV) and Brazilian government agencies about Purdue’s role in the Brazilian Science Without Borders program.
166 Yes
  
8/20/2014 3:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Gary Bennett 

A new video from David Fincannon, A-All Pest Termite Exterminators, highlights New Orleans, host city of PestWorld 2011. The video includes an interview with Zach Lehman, entomologist at the Insectarium, as well as interviews with several other pest management professionals with ties to New Orleans and Louisiana.

167 No
  
8/20/2014 4:56 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Casey D. Butler 

ESA is pleased to announce the winners of its 2011 awards. Professional awards will be presented at Entomology 2011, ESA’s 59th Annual Meeting, in Reno, Nevada during Monday’s Plenary Session on December 14, 5:00-6:30 p.m. ESA student awards will be presented on Tuesday, November 15, 7:30-8:30 p.m.

John Henry Comstock Graduate Student Awards—These six awards are given to one graduate student from each ESA Branch to promote interest in entomology and to stimulate interest in attending the ESA Annual Meeting. Dr. Casey D. Butler received the award for the Pacific Branch.

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168 No
  
8/20/2014 4:56 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dissecting Insects
 
About 700 fifth-graders from around Tippecanoe County 'bugged out' of school today to attend the 15th annual Insectaganza at Purdue. The university's entomology program presented dissecting classes, forensic entomology, insect bingo, and a theater program.

Fifth-grader Kloe Timmons said she learned a lot about one of her favorite insects, the grasshopper.  "I've always wanted to know what the the spikes on the back of them are for. And I learned that they're to help protect them from predators," says Timmons.

A large group of Purdue students gave up part of their October break to entertain and teach the fifth-grade classes. The event was conceived out of requests from science programs from area schools.
169 No
  
8/20/2014 4:57 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Julie Longland 

After working several years in the agricultural chemicals industry, Julie Miranda Longland (B.S. '01) gained enough experience to be accepted as a volunteer with USAID's (U.S. Agency for International Development) Farmer-to-Farmer Program this year.

With Partners of the Americas, the organization that administers the Farmer-to-Farmer Program in Latin America, Julie worked with horticulture and potato growers in the highlands of Nicaragua in September. As a Pest and Disease Control Specialist, much of the assignment touched on her roots in the Crop Protection program at Purdue. Meetings with potato cooperatives and a community organization of vegetable growers harkened back to classes with Alan York as she promoted integrated pest management.

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170 No
  
8/20/2014 4:57 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Preadtory Stink Bug 

Predatory Heteroptera are nearly ubiquitous, being found in most natural and managed habitats. Even as predators, heteropteran taxa differ in the degree to which they are predaceous (Cobben, 1979; Sweet, 1979; Cohen, 1990, 1996). A number of taxa are nearly totally predaceous (it is unclear if any are known to be totally predaceous), such as the reduviids and nabids. Some of those taxa are also known as intraguild predators (Rosenheim, 2005), feeding on other predator taxa, including other heteropterans.

Another, large fraction of the predatory Heteroptera are those that are considered facultative predators (Wheeler, 1976). These predators are sometimes termed ‘‘omnivorous,’’ (Eubanks and Denno, 1999; Coll and Guershon, 2002), which may be oversimplifying the relationships of the predators have with their prey and the rest of the taxa – animal, plant and fungi at different trophic levels – in the habitats (Lundgren, 2009). The continuum ranges from predators that are occasionally herbivorous to herbivores that occasionally are predaceous (Naranjo and Gibson, 1996; Coll, 1998). The recognition of their ability to feed on a number of kinds of prey (and non-prey foods) has earned those taxa the epithet ‘‘generalist,’’ rather than omnivore. More recently, Heteroptera with a diet that includes both plant and insect meals have been termed facultatively zoophytophagous (Alomar and Wiedenmann, 1996).

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171 No
  
8/20/2014 4:59 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Nicholas Seiter 

BLACKVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Kudzu — the "plant that ate the South" — has finally met a pest that's just as voracious. Trouble is, the so-called "kudzu bug" is also fond of another East Asian transplant that we happen to like, and that is big money for American farmers.

Soybeans.

"When this insect is feeding on kudzu, it's beneficial," Clemson University entomologist Jeremy Greene says as he stands in a field swarming with the brown, pea-sized critters. "When it's feeding on soybeans, it's a pest."

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172 No
  
8/20/2014 4:59 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Big bug from Colombia 

The International Organization of Biological Control has weeklong workshops each year, focusing on theory and techniques relevant to the organization’s ideals. This year, the focus was on biodiversity in agroecosystems and the effects of this on biological control.

A natural location for a course focusing on biodiversity would be in the tropics. Thus, the course was centered in Cali, Colombia at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT). Course leaders included USDA researchers and professors from several major Colombian universities. Participants represented 4 different countries, many levels of experience, and a variety of backgrounds. Because of this, each participant brought unique perspectives to the meeting.

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173 No
  
8/20/2014 4:59 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tom Turpin with friend at Science Theater 

What do Matilda Mosquito, Bartholomew "Barfy" Bee and Franz Firefly have in common? Well, they too survived the formative high school years, but their experience was unlike any other because they graduated from Bugville High.

The story of the six-legged teens is featured in "The Insecta Class Yearbook," a play performed by Purdue's Science Theater Outreach Program (STOP). In its inaugural year as a student organization, STOP has started to accept requests to take the play far from the borders of West Lafayette.

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174 No
  
8/20/2014 5:00 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Black-and-yellow garden spider 

Most people don't harbor fond feelings for the creatures known as spiders. In fact, as a group, spiders are probably the least-liked of all arthropods. And that is saying something. None of the other common arthropods - insects, ticks, mites, scorpions, lobsters, crayfish and pillbugs - rank very high on the human likeability scale either.

When it comes to fondness for other animals we humans are partial to creatures that are more like us. You know, warm-blooded and hairy. We love these kinds of animals and even keep some, such as dogs, cats, and the occasional rat, as pets. We spend all kinds of money on our mammal pets, providing fancy food, veterinary care, special toys and even grooming.

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175 No
  
8/20/2014 5:01 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Investigating ants in Hawaii 

A common pest in the mainland United States known for its tropical smell now has a tropical habitat to go along with it.

Odorous house ants - so called because they tend to invade houses and smell like coconut when smashed - have found their way to Hawaii. And, according to Purdue University entomologist Grzegorz Buczkowski, it doesn't seem as though they have plans to end their vacations.

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176 No
  
8/20/2014 5:02 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Wow! Look at those gorgeous butterflies. 


With the Halloween season in full swing the Entomology Graduate Organization (EGO) and Thomas Say Entomological Society joined forces to partake in the festivities at Conner Prairie’s Headless Horseman event in Fishers, IN. The group brought with them an interactive booth that allowed visitors to hold a cockroach, pet a millipede, and even eat a live mealworm if they dared! For those slightly less adventurous, several collection boxes of creepy-crawlies were available to look at and people were encouraged to ask questions about any insects they saw.

177 No
  
8/20/2014 5:02 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Representative James Dill, D-ME 

Representative Jim Dill is serving in his first term in the Maine House of Representatives. Dill has been appointed to serve as a member on the Joint Standing Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

Rep. Dill’s professional career has focused on education and pest management. In addition to being a Professor at the University of Maine Cooperative Extension and in Biological Sciences, he currently serves as Chair of the RSU #34 School Board, and Chair of the Board of Directors of the United Technologies Center in Bangor.

Dill’s community involvement includes serving as a member of the Orono/Old Town Kiwanis as well as serving on their board of directors, chair of the Greater Old Town Communities That Care which is a mentoring and substance abuse prevention program and a member at large on the River Coalition Advisory Board.

Dill is a graduate of the University of Maine, where he received a Bachelor's of Science in Biology and a Master’s of Science in Entomology and Purdue University, where he received a PhD in Entomology. He resides in Old Town with his wife Jane and has three grown children.
178 No
  
8/20/2014 5:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Nicole R. Vanderlaan-Hannon

The Entomological Society of America just wrapped up its 59th annual meeting in Reno, Nevada this past Wednesday. The meeting was hosted by President Ernest “Del” Delfosse with over 2,500 participants from all 50 states and 37 countries. Purdue was well represented with a dozen faculty and staff and as many graduate students. Purdue gave talks and posters throughout the meeting beginning with Tom Turpin at 8 am on Sunday morning through the last session on Wednesday afternoon with Christian Krupke.

Our students did an outstanding job presenting their research and representing the department. We received four student awards including two for talks and two for posters. Nikki VanDerLaan-Hannon won First Place for her talk on "Conophthorin enhances the efficacy of ethanol-baited lures for trapping the granulate ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)."

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179 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Professor Tom Turpin 

Stand up comic and TV personality Jeff Foxworthy made a name for himself with a series of "you might be a redneck" one-liners. You know, things like you might be a redneck if you think a stock tip is advice on worming your hogs.

Like many previous good ideas, nearly everyone and his brother have adapted this one for other uses. Such a joke can be used to describe localities: You might be from a small town if you know all your neighbors and their dogs by name. Or you might be from New England if your Dairy Queen is closed from September through May.

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180 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:03 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Donald Paschke 

John Donald (Don) Paschke, an emeritus professor of entomology at Purdue University, passed away October 13, 2011 at his home in Bloomington, Indiana. Don was 85 years old. He was trained in entomology at the University of California at Berkeley and worked for the Illinois Natural History Survey when he was hired by John Osmun as an insect pathologist to work on biological control. He was an early pioneer in the development of insect viruses for applied insect control, and had a keen interest in international development. He was major professor for 11 graduate students, including Dr. Max Summers who later was elected as a fellow in the National Academy of Sciences. Don served on the faculty in Entomology at Purdue from 1960 to 1990.

For more information click here

181 No
  
8/20/2014 5:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
2011 ESA Student Competition Winners 

At Entomology 2011, students competed in two competitions -- the poster competition, and the 10-minute paper competition. Winners each year receive a free one-year membership in ESA, a $70 cash prize, and a certificate.

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182 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:04 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Richard Shukle 

Wheat's genetic resistance to Hessian flies has been failing, but a group of Purdue University and U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists believe that other plants may soon be able to come to the rescue.

The Purdue and USDA research team developed a method to test toxins from other plants on Hessian fly larvae. The test simulates the effect of a transgenic plant without the lengthy and costly procedures necessary to actually create those plants.

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183 Yes
  
12/2/2014 1:17 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. F. Thomas Turpin 

The word “ugly” is a negative term that can be used to describe appearance, behavior or even morals. Hans Christian Andersen used the word in his tale “The Ugly Duckling.” It is a story about inherent potential. In this case, the ugly duckling ultimately becomes a beautiful swan.

To many people, the term is an apt expression of their feelings regarding the appearance of insects. I haven’t done a formal survey on the subject, but in my experience people often express their feelings about insects using the words “ugly” and “gross” – especially if the encounter is up close and personal.

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184 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:05 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Trout underwater 

'Twas the night before Hatch, when all through the flow - Not a creature was stirring, not even a subimago; The sulphurs were tied by the anglers with care, In hopes that hungry trout soon would be there;

The salmonids were nestled all snug in their beds, While search-images of flies hadn't yet formed in their heads; And caddis in their cases, and notonectids on their back, Were just coming out for a late evening's snack.

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185 No
  
8/20/2014 5:14 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Steve Yaninenk, Department Head, presenting gift to Melissa Shepson, Outreach Coordinator and 2011 OSA recipient 

Holiday lights. Festive decorations. Delicious finger food. Hot and cold drinks. Unexpected gifts. And PIE!

What better way to celebrate and honor the 2011 recipient of the Outstanding Service Award – Melissa Shepson. The December 15th reception was held in her honor in Whistler Hall. Three individuals – Cliff Sadof, Matt Ginzel and Jennifer Tsuruda – offered testimonials to Melissa’s helpfulness, organizational skills and overall service to the department. Department Head Steve Yaninek presented her with a plaque upon which a clock is mounted, along with an attached plate acknowledging the award. There is also a monetary gift which accompanies the honor.

186 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:05 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bee hive covered with bees 

For thousands of years humans have taken advantage of what has been called the “food of the gods.” We’re talking about honey. Honey is a sugar-laden substance produced by a few species of bees as their food. And somewhere in our history ancient humans got a taste of honey, and we have been eating it ever since.

Of course, bees don’t willingly share their food stores with humans – or other animals for that matter. So the first honey eaters had to resort to stealing from the bees. And such pilferage wasn’t a pleasant thing because, as Shakespeare wrote, bees are “armed in their stings.”

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187 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Honey bee on large leaf 

Honeybee populations have been in serious decline for years, and Purdue University scientists may have identified one of the factors that cause bee deaths around agricultural fields.

Analyses of bees found dead in and around hives from several apiaries over two years in Indiana showed the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, which are commonly used to coat corn and soybean seeds before planting. The research showed that those insecticides were present at high concentrations in waste talc that is exhausted from farm machinery during planting.

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188 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:06 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Green grasshopper on green leaf 

Almost everyone has read or heard a story that begins with, "Once upon a time." That phrase is often used to introduce a fable or a tale with its origins in bygone days. For example, "The Story of the Three Bears" begins, "Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks."

Once upon a time in the Midwestern United States there existed a major ecosystem - the tallgrass prairie. It covered some 142 million acres from western Indiana through Illinois and Iowa to the eastern parts of Nebraska and Kansas.

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189 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:06 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Gary Bennett 

“We’re celebrating our Centennial. Beginning in 1912, this year marks 100 years of entomology here at Purdue University,” said Gary Bennett, professor of urban pest management for Purdue’s Entomology Department, at the kick-off of the Annual Purdue Pest Management Conference held January 9-11. “This is the 76th pest management conference we’ve held here, and every year, input from our attendees helps us to make each conference more enriching than the one before.”

The three-day conference offered more than 20 educational sessions, giving attendees the opportunity to step up to pest management’s cutting edge by learning about new technologies, techniques and business strategies. Highlights of this year’s conference included a Monday morning session by Hall of Famer Paul Hardy, senior technical director of Orkin Pest Control. He explored new technologies available to pest management professionals (PMPs) and some of the improved integrated pest management strategies changing the way many companies are conducting the technical side of their businesses.

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190 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Logo of the Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage Project 

THE NEED: Grain storage loss can cost farmers 25%-30% of their yield for the season. In Afghanistan, over 30 million people depend on stored grains for consumption.

THE SOLUTION: Jump start the supply chain for low-cost hermetic storage bags to help Afghan farmers avoid storage loss of grains.

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191 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:06 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Department Head Steve Yaninek with study abroad student Michelle Lee 

Please welcome Michelle Lee, an entomology student currently studying at Purdue as an exchange student from the National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan.

Michelle was born in Starkville, Mississippi where her father received his PhD in food science. Her father took a faculty position at Da-Yeh University in Taiwan after his studies and now works in the food industry.


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192 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:06 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Val J. Watts and Catherine A. Hill, Purdue researchers, prepare a test on insect larvae 

Purdue researchers are discovering the next generation of insecticides directed at disease-carrying insects like mosquitoes, ticks and tsetse flies, which could help professionals in the human health, veterinary and crop production sectors.

Catherine A. Hill, associate professor of entomology in the College of Agriculture, and Val J. Watts, professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology in the College of Pharmacy, say vector insects - which carry and transmit infectious pathogens or parasites to other living organisms - are developing resistance to insecticides sprayed in the air or embedded in bed nets. The increased resistance makes insecticides less effective.

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193 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:06 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Robber fly eating Japanese beetle on a green leaf 

Human history has had its share of infamous robbers. In the United States, Jesse James, Bonnie and Clyde, and John Dillinger come to mind. England was home to Robin Hood and Dick Turpin; individuals who it is said sometimes helped themselves to the money of others.

In the interest of full disclosure, to my knowledge, the English outlaw Dick Turpin is not one of my ancestors. While being related to a legendary robber might not seem to be a good thing, in this case, it does have its perks. People with the surname Turpin are sometimes given a free drink at Dick Turpin British pubs!

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194 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Robert Anderson 

In this video, Sayde Ridling, a student from Rutgers University, interviews Robert Anderson of Cricket Science in the Exhibit Hall at Entomology 2011 in Reno, Nevada. Dr. Anderson has attended ESA meetings for over 40 years.

Click here for video.

195 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:05 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Charles Aaron, Vicki Cassens, Larry Bledsoe and Arwin Provonsha 

Purdue University honored staff for their years of service at the Provost Recognition Luncheon on January 19, 2012 in the Purdue Memorial Union. Those recognized from Entomology included Charles Aaron (10 years), Lori Edwards (10 years), Vicki Cassens (25 years), Larry Bledsoe (30 years) and Arwin Provonsha (40 years).

Congratulations to the honorees for their dedication, service and contributions to the department and the university. Attached is a photo of the award winners who attended the ceremony.

196 Yes
  
8/20/2014 2:08 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Dr. Paul A. Cammer 

Moving a wheel chair just by thinking about it? Students at Thomas Jefferson High School are doing some amazing research in neuroscience and they have figured out how to do exactly that!

To view video click here.

197 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:07 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Tamarisk manna scale (manna) 

There are many types of scales. Some are small plate-like structures that form the external covering of fish or reptiles. There are flakey scales, such as the rust that forms on metal. A system of ordered marks, such as a ruler with inches and centimeters, used for measurements is also called a scale. Another type of scale is a series of tones in music. Other scales, such as the one in your bathroom, are designed for weighing things.

There are also scales in the world of insects - a fact that almost anyone who raises plants for either fun or profit can attest. That's because scales of the insect kind are major plant pests.

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198 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:08 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Joe Ruhl, biology teacher at Jefferson High School, Lafayette 

The top science educator in the country has been named and he can be found right in Lafayette.

Joe Ruhl, a biology teacher at Lafayette Jeff, has been recognized by the National Science Teaching Association.

The Shell National Science Teaching Award recognizes outstanding teaching and a positive impact on students.  Ruhl was nominated in August.  Two weeks ago, a committee of judges came to Lafayette to watch Ruhl's teaching techniques in the classroom.

Ruhl said he is honored and humbled by the award.  “The best part of this whole thing has been how excited the students have gotten about this. I mean, that's just warmed my heart beyond words,” said Ruhl.
In addition to the title of the top science educator in the country, Ruhl also was awarded with $10,000 and an all expenses paid trip to the National Science Teacher Convention.
199 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:09 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Bean leaf beetle on green leaf 

Crop pests may be more abundant in Indiana farm fields this spring because of what continues to be a mild winter.

Some species of insects and weeds may have benefited from the warmer-than-normal temperatures and lack of snowfall in the state, two Purdue Extension specialists say.

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200 Yes
  
8/20/2014 5:09 PMNo presence informationGosnell, Cindie L.
Alternate text to describe the picture goes here 

To see a video of the PICS bag story, click here.

 

The hermetic grain storage bags that cut off oxygen to weevils and have saved West and Central African farmers hundreds of millions of dollars by putting the brakes on the insects' rapid multiplication don't merely suffocate them as once thought, a Purdue University study shows.

More than 25 years after introducing the Purdue Improved Cowpea Storage (PICS) bags to farmers in Africa, Larry Murdock, a professor of insect physiology, discovered that weevils produce much of their water themselves through metabolic processes. When oxygen in the bags decreases, the weevils cannot use it to create water, and instead of suffocating, they eventually die of thirst.

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