the big idea

nanoparticles

the big idea

nanoparticles

01

Paper Illustration

Nano = one-billionth
Nanometer = one-billionth of a meter
Sheet of paper = ~100,000 nanometers thick
Nanoparticle = between 1–100 nanometers in diameter

02

Cube Illustration

Nano-scale particles have unusual properties, including an increased ratio of surface area to volume. Scientists take advantage of these properties and the unique ways nanoparticles interact with other materials.

Mixture in beaker illustration

03

For example, niclosamide, a drug with potential to treat cancer and a broad spectrum of viruses, including coronavirus, has a tough, crystalline structure. This makes it difficult to dissolve, and in turn, difficult for the body to absorb.

Nanoparticles Illustration

04

OHPP, a nanoparticle derived from U.S.-grown corn, was developed by Yuan Yao, professor of food science, and his collaborators. It can form hydrogen bonds with niclosamide, making the drug up to 5,000 times more soluble.

Stomach with pill illustration

05

Making niclosamide more soluble makes it more bioavailable, which would allow the drug to be released through an oral formulation like a capsule or tablet.

Paper Illustration

01

Nano = one-billionth
Nanometer = one-billionth of a meter
Sheet of paper = ~100,000 nanometers thick
Nanoparticle = between 1–100 nanometers in diameter

Cube Illustration

02

Nano-scale particles have unusual properties, including an increased ratio of surface area to volume. Scientists take advantage of these properties and the unique ways nanoparticles interact with other materials.

Beaker with mixture illustration

03

For example, niclosamide, a drug with potential to treat cancer and a broad spectrum of viruses, including coronavirus, has a tough, crystalline structure. This makes it difficult to dissolve, and in turn, difficult for the body to absorb.

Nanoparticle Illustration

04

OHPP, a nanoparticle derived from U.S.-grown corn, was developed by Yuan Yao, professor of food science, and his collaborators. It can form hydrogen bonds with niclosamide, making the drug up to 5,000 times more soluble.

stomach with pill illustration

05

Making niclosamide more soluble makes it more bioavailable, which would allow the drug to be released through an oral formulation like a capsule or tablet.

OTHER NANOTECHNOLOGY USES

NETWORK

more portable electronic systems, better screens

BATTERY

efficient batteries and energy-conducting materials

WATER

cleaner water and oil spill cleanup

MEAL

packaging that prevents spoilage and contamination

PHONE

advanced glass films and lightweight materials

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