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Forestry and Natural Resources > FNR Celebrates 100 Years > shareStoriesHerberg
 

 Shared Story: Randall Herberg, BSF in Forest Management, class of 1956

 

Sophomore Summer Camp at Henryville, Indiana 1954

Camp lasted ten weeks; six of which covered surveying. Don Bline was our professor. Words of encouragement before we began a section line – “If you fall, be sure you land on that bottom. Transits are expensive and cost $600!” We did as we were told; we disturbed a Yellow Jacket nest one day. No one was stung, but footwork was fast and furious for a few seconds.

One day we were running some kind of survey exercise and it began to rain pretty hard, so we folded up and headed for camp. Charlie Miller greeted us and asked what we were doing back. We told him it was raining. He asked what we were going to do when we had a job and it rained. Obviously, we didn’t have the correct answer, and he strongly suggested we get our butts back out in the woods. Several days later, it rained real hard and we were getting soaked to the skin. Amid a discussion, it was determined that the criteria for enough rain being enough, was when the rain ran down the crack of our butts, we were going in. It did; we did. We explained our new rule to Charlie and he went along with it.

One of the surveying methods to determine area was called Double Meridian Distance (DMD). We changed the concept a bit and called it the Damndest Method Devised.

Dan DenUyl was trying to teach us a bit of Silviculture one day and stopped in an area of Clark State Forest. He asked us what had taken place there in the past. We glanced about and could tell reproduction was almost nonexistent, but didn’t know why. Marc Hmurovich [Marc was number 75 on the 1954 Purdue football team] had the answer! “It looks like the trampling effect of rodents to me,” said Marc. We all about chocked with laughter! Dan wasn’t amused. He proceeded to tell us that it had been grazed down by elk that had been penned there years ago.

1954 Sophomore Forestry Camp, 1954. Marc Hmurovich on left  and Randy Herberg on right. (Photo provided by Randall Herberg. Used with permission.) 1954 Sophomore Forestry Camp, 1954. Marc Hmurovich on left and Randy Herberg on right. (Photo provided by Randall Herberg. Used with permission.)
1954 Sophomore Forestry Camp. Randy Herberg on left. Unknown partner on right.  (Photo by J. C. Allen & Son, Inc. No. 18745, FNR Archives, used with permission.) 1954 Sophomore Forestry Camp. Randy Herberg on left. Unknown partner on right. (Photo by J. C. Allen & Son, Inc. No. 18745, FNR Archives, used with permission.)

Senior Summer Camp at Wiggins, Mississippi. Fall of 1954

One of our welcomes to Mississippi was the orientation by the forester in charge of the University of Mississippi State Forest where we were housed. He asked us to pull up a soft piece of grass and have a seat, which we did. At the end of his orientation he thanked us for collecting some of the red bugs (chiggers) from the area; we were loaded. The next day at another location another instructor invited us to sit down on soft grass again. Needless to say, we ignored him. He was a bit frustrated with our not doing as he asked until someone in our class advised him that if he had anything to say, he’d better say it because we were going to stand and we didn’t want any more of their red bugs. That kind of set the tone for the rest of our three weeks in Mississippi.

At a sawmill one day, we all were real thirsty and went to the drinking fountain to get a drink. What should we see, but two signs designating “white” and “colored?” We looked at the incoming water pipe and the pipes had a “Y” below the fountains, so it was the same water. We drank out of both of them. The sawmill instructor told us we couldn’t drink out of the colored fountain, and we suggested strongly to him that we were darn sure were going to because it was hot, we were thirsty, and we had to get back on the road right away. He backed off. No problems from the mill workers occurred. There were more of us than of them, and some of our class members were Korean vets and didn’t put up much nonsense; they were in school for an education.

We all also got an education about small green peppers in little glass bottles on the dining tables in the mess hall at camp. Another new thing for us!

The bus we traveled in sucked dust in the back door real bad on gravel roads. When we were hot, tired, and dusty, someone came up with a chant that was so raunchy it can’t be put on paper here, but it sure expressed our feelings about summer camp, Mississippi, the bus, and the hot weather.

Conclave

1953 started the Midwest Forestry Conclave that apparently continues today. Kalamazoo, Michigan was the first one followed by Cloquet, Minnesota, and Ames, Iowa. A good time was generally had by all at these events.