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FoodSci News

  
Laser tool speedus up detection of Salmonella in food products

​Natalie van Hoose
Agricultural Communications
February 13, 2014
Referenced Article


​Purdue University researchers have developed a laser sensor that can identify Salmonella bacteria grown from food samples about three times faster than conventional detection methods.

IMAGE:  A BARDOT-generated portrait of the microbial community in a sample taken from raw chicken. A laser beam shines through each selected bacterai coloy on the plate (center), producing a distinct black and white scatter pattern used to identify the type of bacteria. BARDOT can differentiate Salmonella (left) from non-Salmonella (right) bacteria. (Image courtesy of Arun Bhunia and Atul Singh)

 

 

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Purdue's Keener to teach food science at Moscow university

​Keith Robinson
Agricultural Communications
January 2, 2014
Referenced Article

Purdue professor Kevin Keener has received a Distinguished Fulbright Fellowship to teach food science and food engineering at Moscow State AgroEngineering University in Russia during the 2014 spring semester.

 

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Start-up Company finishes strong in global competition

​Purdue Ag Administration

Phytoption LLC, a start-up company based at Purdue Research Park with which Yuan Yao, Food Science, is associated, was awarded runner-up among more than 220 entries in the Global Food and Health Innovation Challenge in November at the Global South Summit in Nashville, Tenn., for its All Natural Food Color initiative. 

 

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Purdue innovation kills waterborne microorganisms, produces safer drinking water

Steve Martin
Purdue Research Foundation
October 23, 2013
Referenced Article


Ernest "Chip" R. Blatchley III, professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering  and Bruce Applegate, associate professor of food science and biological sciences (pictured left) at Purdue University, have developed prototypes of a water disinfection system to take advantage of UV radiation from the sun, which is plentiful in many areas where clean water is lacking.

"Millions of people in developing countries do not have readily available water, or they become sick because of the water they drink," he said. "People in these countries may not have the infrastructure or financial resources to clean the water, deliver it and keep it clean until it's used. Common problems include microbial pathogens, which are largely associated with human and animal waste."
 ​
 

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Device speeds concentration step in food-pathogen detection

Emil Venere
Purdue Marketing & Media
October 14, 2013
Referenced Article


Researchers have developed a system that concentrates foodborne salmonella and other pathogens faster than conventional methods by using hollow thread-like fibers that filter out the cells, representing a potential new tool for speedier detection.

 

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Cool summer to benefit Indiana grapes, future wines

Natalie van Hoose
Agricultural Communications
September 3, 2013
Referenced Article

This summer's mild temperatures and modest rainfall have been good for Indiana's wine grapes, which could lead to more flavorful, aromatic wines, say members of the Purdue Wine Grape Team.

 

Average temperatures in July and August were slightly cooler than normal, conditions that allowed ripening grapes to accumulate sugar and maintain acid levels. An extraordinarily dry August also was beneficial, as heavy rainfall can cause ripened grapes to split, leading to pest damage and disease.
 
"We've had really moderate conditions, and that helps improve fruit quality," said viticulture specialist Bruce Bordelon. "Cooler weather leads to higher sugar content and higher acidity, yielding a better balance overall. Our mid- and early-ripening varieties should do really well."
 

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Ferruzzi to receive Top Ag Research Award

Tom Campbell
Agricultural Communications
May 7, 2013
Referenced Article

Professor of food and nutrition sciences Mario Ferruzzi will receive the Purdue University 2013 Agricultural Research Award for his work in helping to improve food quality and human health and to reduce chronic disease.

The award is given each year to a faculty member in the College of Agriculture with less than 18 years of experience beyond a doctoral degree. It is for scientists who have demonstrated a high level of excellence in research and made significant contributions to agriculture, natural resources and quality of life for Indiana citizens.
  

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Food Science Alumnus Scott Lineback to receive Distinguished Agricultural Alumni Award

Keith Robinson
Agricultural Communications
February 27, 2013
Referenced Article

Nine Purdue University College of Agriculture alumni will receive the college's highest honor, the Distinguished Agriculture Alumni Award, at a ceremony Friday (March 1) on campus.

The annual award honors mid-career Purdue Agriculture graduates who have made significant contributions to their profession or society in general and have a record of outstanding accomplishments.
The award will be presented during a convocation at 3:30 p.m. in the Purdue Memorial Union North Ballroom. A 2:30 p.m. reception, open to the public, will precede the ceremony.

  
Scott Lineback, Food Science Alumnus (MS 1989, PhD 1994)
Vice President of Process Innovation at ConAgra Foods

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Did You Know?: Richard P. Vine Enology Library

Amanda Hamon
University News Service
January 11, 2013
Referenced Article


Nestled in a small corner of Nelson Hall of Food Science's basement is a beautifully furnished, cave-shaped room best described as a wine cellar.
 
The Richard P. Vine Enology Library, as it's officially called, was built in 1999 using a donation from Forest Glen Winery in Sonoma, Calif. Fred Franzia, the winery's owner, wanted the Indiana Wine Grape Council to use the library to promote wine education, says Jill Blume, enology specialist for the Purdue Wine Grape Team.

 
Jill Blume, enology specialist
for the Purdue Wine Grape Team.
(Purdue University photo/Mark Simons)

 

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Grilled, seared foods may add to waistlines, disease risk

Brian Wallheimer
Agricultural Communications
December 11, 2012
Referenced Article

Kee-Hong Kim found that the chemicals created by some cooking methods, including grilling, may allow immature fat cells to survive and accumulate lipids, blocking a cellular process that would normally kill those cells.

 

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Scientists have way to control sugars that lead to diabetes, obesity

Brian Wallheimer
Agricultural Communications
September 25, 2012
Referenced Article

hamaker-b06ScaledDownForWeb.jpg
Scientists can now turn on or off the enzymes responsible for processing starchy foods into sugars in the human digestive system, a finding they believe will allow them to better control those processes in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Bruce Hamaker, a professor of food science and director of the Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research at Purdue University, said the four small intestine enzymes, called alpha-glucosidases, are responsible for generating glucose from starch digestion. Each enzyme functions differently, breaking down starches into different sugars at different rates. Someone missing one or more of those enzymes creates glucose improperly.

 

 

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Purdue experts remind about proper food handling amid salmonellosis outbreak

Brian Wallheimer
Agricultural Communication
August 17, 2012
Referenced Article​

Haley OliverPurdue University food safety experts are reminding consumers to thoroughly wash and properly store all produce in the wake of a salmonellosis outbreak in Kentucky.

 

 

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Indiana winery takes top honors in Indy International

Keith Robinson
Purdue University News Service
August 3, 2012
Referenced Article​

River City WineryFor the first time, an Indiana winery took top honors at the Indy International Wine Competition, which took place Wednesday through Friday (Aug. 1-3) at Purdue University.  River City Winery of New Albany was awarded Wine of Year for its 2011 Vignoles. The entry was among nearly 2,400 wines from 41 states and 14 countries competing in the annual event. The competition is run by the Indiana Wine Grape Council.

 

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Rapidly cooling eggs can double shelf life, decrease risk of illness

Brian Wallheimer
Purdue University News Service
June 11, 2012
Referenced Article

Kevin Keener developed a rapid egg cooling system that uses circulated carbon dioxide to create a thin layer of ice inside an egg's shell that cools the inside of an egg within minutes, strengthening proteins and increasing shelf life.
"There is no statistical difference in quality between eggs as measured by Haugh units just after laying and rapidly cooled eggs at 12 weeks," he said. "This rapid-cooling process can provide a significant extension in the shelf life of eggs compared to traditional processing."

 

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Purdue starts new round of ag training in Afghanistan

​Keith Robinson
Purdue University News Service
May 24, 2012
Referenced Article


In June, two faculty members from Purdue will continue the training mission. Ramesh Vemulapalli, head of the Department of Comparative Pathobiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine and professor of veterinary immunology and microbiology, will give training for government officials in animal health diagnostics. Haley Oliver, assistant professor of food science, will provide training in food safety mostly to government officials and representatives of private industry and businesses. Oliver will be accompanied by a faculty member at Texas Tech University.

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Purdue zipTrips earns Agriculture 2012 Team Award

​Brian Wallheimer
Purdue University News Service
March 28, 2012
Referenced Article

"The zipTrips Team is making a difference by creating virtual field trips that connect thousands of students in hundreds of classrooms across the country," said Jay Akridge, the Glenn W. Sample Dean of the College of Agriculture. "Using a novel combination of materials and media, zipTrips are an innovative way to provide students with fun, engaging and memorable educational experiences in science."
 

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Celebration recognizes graduate students' teaching excellence

​Purdue Today
April 26, 2012
Referenced Article

Madhuvanti Kale
Madhuvanti Kale

Committee for the Education of Teaching Assistants Excellence in Teaching Award recipients are selected by each academic department for their commitment to undergraduate education.  This year's recipients include Purdue Food Science's Madhuvanti Kale.
 

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Red wine, fruit compound could help block fat cell formation

​Brian Wallheimer
Purdue University News Service
April 4, 2012
Referenced Article


Kee-Hong Kim, an assistant professor of food science, and Jung Yeon Kwon, a graduate student in Kim's laboratory, reported in this week's issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry that the compound piceatannol blocks an immature fat cell's ability to develop and grow.

 

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