Worker Protection Standard (WPS) Training

According to the EPA, the “Worker Protection Standard (WPS) aims to reduce pesticide poisonings and injuries among agricultural workers and pesticide handlers. The WPS offers occupational protections to over 2 million agricultural workers and pesticide handlers who work at over 600,000 agricultural establishments.” Purdue is no exception. All individuals that work in paid status at Purdue University must take training if working in greenhouses and growth rooms. Training is administered through Radiological and Environmental Management (REM) on campus, but REM allows departments to render training if trainers are WPS certified trainers.  Nathan Deppe can render training for you! 

So how does this work?

1) Please access this link and watch the WPS training video. 

2) Once viewed, send Nathan Deppe an email with:  Your Name, Date Viewed, and the EPA Approval Number of Training Video.

3) Once received, you will be asked to complete a WPS-Training and Information Verification form and to schedule a time to return a completed copy to Nathan at his office (1139 B Horticulture Greenhouse Building).

4) After a quick discussion, you will be WPS certified (Handler Status) for one year.  This training is required annually.

5) At this time, you may receive key card access to HGRH if needed.  Please visit this link to request, and select "Yes, I have already completed my WPS training" in the appropriate field.  If no access to HGRH is requested, please proceed to #6.

6) Lastly, set a reminder to retake training annually if you plan to continue working at the HLA Plant Growth Facility and need to maintain key card access.  This training is also required for certain individ24 Nathan has no mechanism to notify you to retake training at this time. 






Horticulture & Landscape Architecture, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010 USA, (765) 494-1300

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