» Purdue food science video scavenger hunt welcomes new majors

FOOD SCIENCE

Purdue food science video scavenger hunt welcomes new majors

October 27, 2020

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has presented large hurdles to overcome, particularly for Purdue’s new incoming students. Allie Kingery, the department’s undergraduate academic adviser, approached the food science club officers with the idea of making a Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt video for the department’s freshmen seminar class. Purdue’s Food Science Club jumped at the opportunity to help. The club members remembered having the scavenger hunt in the beginning weeks of their freshmen year and how fun it was to explore the building.

With circumstances preventing an in-person scavenger hunt from taking place this year, the club officers instead produced a video that showcased Nelson Hall and promoted some of the professional and personal development opportunities within the department.

According to the club’s president, Erin Sukala, all the members were excited to welcome the incoming students. “We really wanted to do something to help the incoming food science majors feel welcome and connected even during this unprecedented time,” said Sukala. “As club president, I was incredibly proud to see how well our officer team worked together and it makes me excited to see what our club can achieve this year, even under abnormal circumstances.”

            Follow this link to view the Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EJUcIcd36Tr28wlXG0sXYzE57hpfh4lZ/view

Erin Sukala
Club President Erin Sukala

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has presented large hurdles to overcome, particularly for Purdue’s new incoming students. Allie Kingery, the department’s undergraduate academic adviser, approached the food science club officers with the idea of making a Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt video for the department’s freshmen seminar class. Purdue’s Food Science Club jumped at the opportunity to help. The club members remembered having the scavenger hunt in the beginning weeks of their freshmen year and how fun it was to explore the building.

With circumstances preventing an in-person scavenger hunt from taking place this year, the club officers instead produced a video that showcased Nelson Hall and promoted some of the professional and personal development opportunities within the department.

According to the club’s president, Erin Sukala, all the members were excited to welcome the incoming students. “We really wanted to do something to help the incoming food science majors feel welcome and connected even during this unprecedented time,” said Sukala. “As club president, I was incredibly proud to see how well our officer team worked together and it makes me excited to see what our club can achieve this year, even under abnormal circumstances.”

Follow this link to view the Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EJUcIcd36Tr28wlXG0sXYzE57hpfh4lZ/view

Erin Sukala
Club President Erin Sukala
Food Science Officers
Top Row: President Erin Sukala, Vice President Alyson McGovern, Secretary Maddie Harper Bottom Row: Treasurer Kelden Cook, Ag Council Representative Alecia Wichlinski, Event Committee Chair Liz De Acetis

Purdue study addresses environmental, economic impacts of hydroponic, aquaponics systems

Read Full Story >>>

A growing piece of ancient history in your kitchen

Want to cook like the ancient Egyptians? You don’t need a fancy cookbook or the ability to read hieroglyphics, all you really need is a sourdough starter.

Sourdough starters’ first recorded use harkens back to ancient Egypt, circa 1500 B.C., although many historians posit similar culinary devices were used as early as Neolithic times. The ability to bake bread with a complex flavor and soft interior revolutionized the Egyptian kitchen. Several thousand years later, sourdough is having another moment.

Read Full Story >>>

Here’s a wine tour you can take, or give as a gift, anytime, anywhere (virus or no virus)

Wine tours out the window in the wake of COVID-19? There’s a way you can still take a tour of one or more notable wine-producing regions around the world – without even leaving home.

Read Full Story >>>

Purdue study addresses environmental, economic impacts of hydroponic, aquaponics systems

Read Full Story >>>

A growing piece of ancient history in your kitchen

Want to cook like the ancient Egyptians? You don’t need a fancy cookbook or the ability to read hieroglyphics, all you really need is a sourdough starter.

Sourdough starters’ first recorded use harkens back to ancient Egypt, circa 1500 B.C., although many historians posit similar culinary devices were used as early as Neolithic times. The ability to bake bread with a complex flavor and soft interior revolutionized the Egyptian kitchen. Several thousand years later, sourdough is having another moment.

Read Full Story >>>

Here’s a wine tour you can take, or give as a gift, anytime, anywhere (virus or no virus)

Wine tours out the window in the wake of COVID-19? There’s a way you can still take a tour of one or more notable wine-producing regions around the world – without even leaving home.

Read Full Story >>>

Purdue University, 610 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907, (765) 494-4600

© 2020 Purdue University | An equal access/equal opportunity university | Integrity Statement | Copyright Complaints | Maintained by News & Stories

If you have trouble accessing this page because of a disability, please contact News & Stories at agweb@purdue.edu.