FOOD SCIENCE

Purdue food science video scavenger hunt welcomes new majors

October 27, 2020

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has presented large hurdles to overcome, particularly for Purdue’s new incoming students. Allie Kingery, the department’s undergraduate academic adviser, approached the food science club officers with the idea of making a Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt video for the department’s freshmen seminar class. Purdue’s Food Science Club jumped at the opportunity to help. The club members remembered having the scavenger hunt in the beginning weeks of their freshmen year and how fun it was to explore the building.

With circumstances preventing an in-person scavenger hunt from taking place this year, the club officers instead produced a video that showcased Nelson Hall and promoted some of the professional and personal development opportunities within the department.

According to the club’s president, Erin Sukala, all the members were excited to welcome the incoming students. “We really wanted to do something to help the incoming food science majors feel welcome and connected even during this unprecedented time,” said Sukala. “As club president, I was incredibly proud to see how well our officer team worked together and it makes me excited to see what our club can achieve this year, even under abnormal circumstances.”

            Follow this link to view the Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EJUcIcd36Tr28wlXG0sXYzE57hpfh4lZ/view

Erin Sukala
Club President Erin Sukala

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has presented large hurdles to overcome, particularly for Purdue’s new incoming students. Allie Kingery, the department’s undergraduate academic adviser, approached the food science club officers with the idea of making a Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt video for the department’s freshmen seminar class. Purdue’s Food Science Club jumped at the opportunity to help. The club members remembered having the scavenger hunt in the beginning weeks of their freshmen year and how fun it was to explore the building.

With circumstances preventing an in-person scavenger hunt from taking place this year, the club officers instead produced a video that showcased Nelson Hall and promoted some of the professional and personal development opportunities within the department.

According to the club’s president, Erin Sukala, all the members were excited to welcome the incoming students. “We really wanted to do something to help the incoming food science majors feel welcome and connected even during this unprecedented time,” said Sukala. “As club president, I was incredibly proud to see how well our officer team worked together and it makes me excited to see what our club can achieve this year, even under abnormal circumstances.”

Follow this link to view the Philip E. Nelson Hall Scavenger Hunt: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1EJUcIcd36Tr28wlXG0sXYzE57hpfh4lZ/view

Erin Sukala
Club President Erin Sukala
Food Science Officers
Top Row: President Erin Sukala, Vice President Alyson McGovern, Secretary Maddie Harper Bottom Row: Treasurer Kelden Cook, Ag Council Representative Alecia Wichlinski, Event Committee Chair Liz De Acetis

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Read Full Story >>>

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When it comes to improving human gut health, approaches and the success of these approaches are based largely on an individual’s gut ecosystem: the bacteria present, its diversity and other factors. Therefore, trying to improve gut health through appli…

Read Full Story >>>

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Anbuhkani “Connie” Muniandy’s curiosity about food developed in her family’s kitchen in her small hometown of Simpang Renggam, Malaysia. While helping her mother prepare meals, she began to wonder why specific ingredient combinations had different outcomes.

Read Full Story >>>