agronomy

Corn plants

Seedlings

Center for Plant Biology boosts Purdue’s plant sciences profile

Monday, September 21st, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing many aspects of life on the Purdue campus to change. Faculty and graduate students are rising to the challenge, redesigning lab courses in creative and innovative ways.

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Student group picture

Supporting students from Zamorano to Purdue and home again

Monday, July 13th, 2020

Staff in IPIA and Food Sciences worked behind the scenes this spring to ensure 11 international interns’ well being and repatriation.

Ada Camila Montoya Gomez, a senior in environmental engineering at Zamorano University in Honduras, was deep into three research projects at Purdue this spring when safety concerns around the coronavirus closed the university.

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Plant scientists maintain critical research to save data and irreplaceable plants

Thursday, July 9th, 2020

The College of Agriculture accounted for more than a third of Purdue researchers who asked for access and support to continue critical research when facilities closed this spring.

With about 15 wiliwili trees in the Lilly Greenhouses, and only 150 left in the wild after an insect pest decimated its population, Purdue oversees an important concentration of this deciduous tree native to Hawaii. Scott McAdam, assistant professor of botany and plant pathology, has been growing the trees for three years.

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Carter with volunteers at Fish Fry

Purdue Ag Alumni Association volunteer earns national award

Friday, June 19th, 2020

“Ben Carter is an outstanding servant leader for the Purdue Ag Alumni Association and the College of Agriculture,” said Karen Plaut, the Glenn W. Sample Dean of the College of Agriculture. “He is always there to lend a helping hand, whether it is at alumni events, the state fair, or helping to advocate for agriculture. He can be counted on to deliver in all circumstances and does it with a smile.”

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Eileen Kladivko performed a 35-year research project at SEPAC on field tile drainage. Pointing at signs.

Purdue Agronomy professor reflects on 35-year research project

Tuesday, June 9th, 2020

“I was the new kid on the block when this project started in 1982,” said Eileen Kladivko, professor of agronomy at Purdue University. “I knew almost nothing about drainage, but that quickly changed.”
Kladivko began her career at Purdue University as an assistant professor of agronomy. Little did she realize that for the next 35 years, she would work on a water drainage project that she initially learned about during her interview.

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Stephen Schwartz and his father

Homeschooled student excels through collaboration

Wednesday, May 13th, 2020

Stephen Schwartz experienced a bizarre sense of deja vu in his final weeks at Purdue, finding them oddly similar to his high school years: finishing his degree online while at the top of his class. However, Schwartz admits his satisfaction at being selected for the 2020 G.A. Ross Award as the top male student in Purdue’s graduating class of roughly 8,000 students outshines his accomplishments in his homeschool class of one.

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Alyson and Peyton at last year's ceremony

Soy-based herbicide takes top honors

Monday, May 4th, 2020

Let’s do that again!” thought Alyson Chaney and Peyton Clark as they stood on stage holding a $10,000 check. On March 27, 2019, after a challenging eight-month competition hosted by the Indiana Soybean Alliance, the pair was already planning their next moves.

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Wheat Misters

Purdue’s Herb Ohm sees decades of work come to fruition

Thursday, April 9th, 2020

Herb Ohm had no intention of retiring in 2014. He still had work to do and, by his own calculations, he’d be in the field and lab for at least another three years when he would turn 70.

After earning his doctorate under famed Purdue wheat breeder and agronomist Fred Patterson, Ohm joined the Purdue faculty in 1971, eventually becoming the leader of the wheat-breeding program when Patterson retired in 1986. One of Ohm’s specialties was crossing wheat with wild and exotic species that contained genes long left behind by those who had cultivated modern wheat varieties. The hope was that those exotic species have natural genetic resistance to pests and diseases.

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Cover Crop Harvest

Long-term study will offer more data on cover crop benefits

Monday, November 18th, 2019

By Brian Wallheimer The popularity of cover crops has reemerged in recent years with farmers looking to a variety of grasses, brassicas and legumes to improve soil health. Cover crops can also improve water holding capacity, reduce erosion and weed pressure, reduce nitrogen leaching, increase soil organic matter, and potentially decrease nitrogen fertilizer application rates…

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Purdue scientist working to remove persistent chemicals from drinking water

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

By Brian Wallheimer Anyone who has enjoyed the ease of sliding a fried egg out of a Teflon-coated frying pan, not had to think twice about the grease from a cheeseburger soaking through the fast-food container, or watched rain water bead on a jacket rather than soak through can thank per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)….

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