Potato

​This is modified from the Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for CommercialGrowers​ (ID-56) as an introduction to the production practices of potatoes. For more information, see the ID-56 or contact a SWPAP specialist.  

Potato

Varieties

Season

Use

Scab Resistance

Appearance and Comments

Dark Red Norland

very early

market, home

good

Dark, deep red; smooth skinned; shallow eyes medium in number

Red Norland

very early

market, home

good

Bright red, oblong, smooth skinned, shallow eyes medium in number

Superior

early

chips, market

very good

White, slight russet, oval, very popular

Russet Norkotah

early

market, home

fair

Very good appearance, good baking quality, fair specific gravity

Cascade

mid-season

market, home

good

White, round

Goldrush

mid-season

market, home

fair

Very good appearance, good baking quality, fair specific gravity.

Snowden

mid-season

chips, market

good

White, very high dry matter, ideal for baking and French fries; exceptional ability to produce white potato chips; tubers sometimes rough

Atlantic

late

chips, market

good

White, blocky-round, high yield; hollow heart, internal browning, high specific gravity

Katahdin

late

market, home

fair

White, smooth, round, shallow-eyed

Kennebec

late

market, home

fair

White, long, oval

Red Pontiac

late

home garden

fair

Red, round, very high yield, low specific gravity, good boiling, mashing type

Russet Burbank

 

 

 

 

For trial only

 

 

 

 

Conestoga

early

 

 

A white type with good shelf life, shape, and baking quality

Somerset

mid-season

 

 

Blocky, very good appearance, high specific gravity, chips well, white

Yukon Gold

early

local market, home

 

Yellow flesh, good size

Russian Banana

late

specialty markets

good

Long, narrow fingerling; pale yellow flesh

Carola

late

specialty markets

good

Yellow skin and flesh, oval

Spacing

Rows 34 to 36 inches apart. Seed pieces 9 to 11 inches apart in row, depending on variety and intended use. Seed 16 to 18 100-pound bags per acre. Seed piece should be 1.5 to 2 ounces. Using B-size certified seed will save cutting labor and reduce tuber-borne diseases.

Fertilizing

Lime: To control common scab, soil pH should be within 5.0 to 5.2. However, low soil pH reduces phosphorus availability and increases availability of toxic elements such as manganese and aluminum. If the field has a history of scab, using scab-resistant varieties is recommended. Then, the soil pH can be 6.5 where phosphorus is most available.

Preplant: N: none — only a small amount such as 24 to 30 pounds with the starter fertilizer. P2O5: none — apply 50 to 150 pounds as a starter depending on the soil test results. K2O: 50 to 400 pounds per acre. Adjust according to soil type, previous management, and soil test results for your state. For the most efficient phosphate application, apply the fertilizer at planting in a band 2 to 3 inches to the side and below each side of the tuber. Examples would be 500 pounds per acre of 6-24-24 or 8-16-16. Do not apply more than 200 pounds of K2O per acre in the band at planting. On sandy soils, broadcast 30 pounds or band 15 pounds sulfur per acre.

Sidedress N: For irrigated sandy soils, two split N applications are recommended: half at emergence and half at hilling or tuber initiation. For the early maturing varieties, use 50 to 60 pounds of N per acre at each growth stage. The second application can be adjusted according to rainfall and a petiole nitrate-N analysis. For upland or finer textured soils, all of the required N can be applied preplant or shortly after emergence. For soils with more than 3 percent organic matter and following soybeans, alfalfa, or a grass-legume hay crop, apply 100 pounds N per acre. For soils with less than 3 percent organic matter and the above rotation, apply 135 pounds N per acre. For potatoes following corn, rye, oats, wheat, or a vegetable crop, apply 150 pounds N per acre. Refer to University of Minnesota recommendations for N rates adjusted for yield goal.