» Message from the Glenn W. Sample Dean of Agriculture

PURDUE AGRICULTURE

Message from the Glenn W. Sample Dean of Agriculture

March 23, 2020

D

ear Purdue Agriculture Community,

Purdue University leaders have made important strategic decisions regarding our campus response to the outbreak of the newly identified coronavirus, COVID-19.  I invite you to read more about those decisions on this site, which will be updated regularly.

For Purdue Agriculture, these important guidelines have several implications that I want to share with you. We will be updating information regularly on this page and through our Twitter feed @PurdueAg.

The Purdue COVID-19 Information Center, 765-496-INFO (4636) or toll-free 1-833-571-1043, is staffed 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., M-F, to answer questions about the coronavirus impact on the Purdue community.

Campus:

  • Beginning Wednesday, March 25, all research, academic and administrative buildings will remain locked throughout the day.
  • We will be moving to remote instruction for the remainder of the Spring 2020 semester.
  • Residence halls will remain open for those students who must remain on campus, but any student who can move home/to a different location should do so.

Cancellation of events:

  • All student and University activities are canceled for the remainder of the semester including traditional in-person commencement.

Extension/Engagement:

  • All face-to-face Engagement/Extension events are canceled or postponed through Sunday, May 17.

Campus visits and tours

I regret to share that all prospective student campus visits and tours are also canceled for the remainder of the semester.  Our Office of Academic Programs staff members are anxious to answer any questions you might have about Purdue Agriculture. I encourage you to reach out to them by phone or email.

These decisions are made with the best interest of the Purdue community and our visitors in mind. We all look forward to welcoming you back to Purdue University and Purdue Agriculture very soon.

Boiler up!

Karen Plaut

Glenn W. Sample Dean of Purdue Agriculture

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“I didn’t want to come to Purdue. I just wanted to get out of the Midwest,” said Brandon Hunter, who grew up in southern Illinois. “I saw myself moving somewhere far away like California, Georgia or Pennsylvania.”

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Read Full Story >>>

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No country grows or consumes more popcorn than the United States and only one state, Nebraska, produces more popcorn than Indiana. Consequently, it’s surprising that in 2019, only 75,000 of Indiana’s 5 million corn acres contained popcorn.

The hard outer hull of popcorn, called the pericarp, explains why 1.5 percent of the state’s corn pops while none of the rest can.

Read Full Story >>>

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To Bill Field, professor of agricultural and biological engineering, a man who suffers a head injury falling from a grain bin in Indiana is no different than a woman who loses a foot to snakebite near Bangkok. “They have the same mechanical needs,” he explains — “how to get to where they need to be and do the things they’ve always done.”

Field directs the national AgrAbility Project, a USDA-NIFA-sponsored program that helps farmers, ranchers and other agricultural workers with disabilities meet those needs. His work focuses on three main areas: the health and well-being of farm families; enhancing emergency response in rural communities; and helping farmers rehabilitate after they’ve experienced a disability. The last priority taps Field’s ongoing research on assistive technology in agricultural workplaces.

Read Full Story >>>

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