Animal Sciences C​ourses

Undergraduate Level/Lower-Division Courses


AGR 10100 Introduction to the College of Agriculture and Purdue University

Class 1, Cr. 0.5. Course meets during weeks 1-8. Co-requisite: One course selected from AGR 11100 to AGR 12400.
Students are introduced to the College of Agriculture and Purdue University. Specific areas discussed include the diversity of career opportunities within agriculture, the relationships between different areas of agriculture, ethics, the impact of undergraduate coursework, including the core curriculum, on scholarship and career preparation, and the challenges facing the food, agricultural, and natural resource system. The use of guest lecturers provides a networking opportunity for students. Enrollment in this course is restricted to beginning freshmen students.

AGR 11400 Introduction to Animal Sciences Academic Programs
Class 1, Cr. 0.5. Course meets during weeks 1-8. Co-requisite: AGR 10100.
An introduction to academic programs offered in the Department of Animal Sciences. Topics include, but are not limited to, undergraduate plans of study, courses, experiential programs, internships, student organizations, career opportunities, academic policies, scholarships, and student services. Professor Diekman and Mr. Delks.

ANSC 10100 Animal Agriculture
Class 3, Cr. 3.
Importance of livestock in the field of agriculture, and the place of meats and other animal products in the human diet. Offered at Vincennes University and Purdue University regional campuses and other distant education sites. Course not available for students enrolled on West Lafayette campus. Credit cannot be obtained for both ANSC 10100 and ANSC 10200. Professor Brady.

ANSC 10200 Introduction to Animal Agriculture
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.
A study of animal agriculture emphasizing the efficient production of animal food products from poultry, dairy, and meat animals. Credit cannot be obtained for both ANSC 10100 and ANSC 10200. Required for ANSC majors classified as freshmen or sophomores. Professors Russell and Patterson.

ANSC 10600 Biology of Companion Animals
Class 3, Cr. 3.
Introduction to the various aspects of companion animal biology. Topics include anatomy, physiology, health, immunity, nutrition, growth, digestion, metabolism, behavior, genetics, reproduction, and lactation. Professor Allrich.

ANSC 18100 Orientation to Animal Sciences
Class 2, Cr. 1.
Introduction to the faculty, programs, opportunities, career preparation, and personal development requirements needed to succeed in a career in the animal industries. Course meets during weeks 1-8. Class trip is optional. Students pay lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Professor Russell and Mr. Delks.

ANSC 20100 Functional Anatomy and Animal Performance
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.
A course designed to observe the norms for acceptable conformation of breeds of farm animals and to relate significant characteristics of farm animals to performance and profitability. Professor Russell.

ANSC 22100 Principles of Animal Nutrition
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: CHM 11100 or CHM 11500 and sophomore, junior or senior classification.
Classification and function of nutrients, deficiency symptoms, digestive processes, characterization of feedstuffs, and formulation of diets for domestic animals. Offered at Vincennes University and Purdue University's Fort Wayne regional campus. Distance learning course is available for non-ANSC students at Purdue and for non-Purdue students. Professor Forsyth.

ANSC 23000 Physiology of Domestic Animals
Class 4, Cr. 4. Prerequisite: BIOL 11000, or BIOL 11100, or BIOL 12100 or BIOL 13100.
A lecture course designed to present physiology of domestic farm animals. Function of tissues and organs, maintenance of internal steady-state conditions, and body responses to external environmental conditions will be presented. Physiological mechanisms involved in lactation, growth, and reproduction will be included. Professors Allrich, Cabot or Mills.

ANSC 24500 Applied Animal Management
Class 1, Lab. 3, Cr. 2.
Skills and practices related to handling and care of beef and dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, and swine. Dr. Neary.

ANSC 28100 Career Planning in Animal Sciences
Class 1, Cr. 1.
A seminar course designed to inform students of the career opportunities in animal industries, develop their interviewing and other interpersonal skills, and begin to plan the course of study, work experiences, and marketing methods needed to obtain a successful internship and employment. Mr. Delks.

ANSC 29200 Special Assignments
Cr. 0.
Reading, discussions, written reports, seminar presentations, teaching, field or laboratory experiences provided for enrichment in special areas of animal science. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Approval of the department head required. Staff.

ANSC 29300 Special Assignments
Cr. 1-3.
Reading, discussions, written reports, seminar presentations, teaching, field or laboratory experiences provided for enrichment in special areas of animal science. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Approval of the department head required. Combination of ANSC 29300 and 49300 cannot exceed six credits. Pass/No Pass grading option only. Staff.

ANSC 29400 Exploring International Agriculture
Cr. 3. An experiential learning class.
Interrelationship of animal agriculture with agronomic production, food industries, culture, national infrastructure, political systems, and international trade will be investigated through international travel. Critical thinking and communications skills will be enhanced by topic leadership, comparative analysis, and seminar presentations. May be repeated for credit with variable title. Intensive travel course to learn about animal industries and culture in other countries. May be repeated for credit with variable title. Permission of instructor required. Staff.

ANSC 29500 Animals in Global Culture
Class 3, Cr. 3.
This course examines the importance of animals in various cultures and societies in the world. Factors which influence the role of animals in society include unique morphological and biological characteristics, behavior and social attributes, and their genetic selection during domestication. Animal uses also depend on the location, geography and climatic, available natural resources, and cultures of the people. The disciplines of agricultural systems, biology, food, and anthropology are integrated as we explore the societal issues surrounding animal-human interactions. Professor Russell.

ANSC 29500 Special Topics in Animal Sciences
Cr. 0-3.
Lecture presentation of specialized material not available in formal courses of the department. The specific topic that is offered will be indicated on the student's record. May be repeated for credit with variable title. Permission of instructor required. Staff.

ANSC 29500 Anatomy and Physiology Honors Lab
Lab. 2, Cr. 1. Prerequisite or corequisite: ANSC 23000.
Lab covering topics presented in ANSC 23000. Professor Mills.


Undergraduate Level/Upper-Division Courses


ANSC 30100 Animal Growth, Development and Evaluation

Class 2, Lab. 4, Cr. 4. Junior or senior classification.
A study of meat animal growth and developmental processes, including micro and gross anatomy, and factors that affect body/carcass composition with application to animal and carcass evaluation. Staff.

ANSC 30300 Animal Behavior
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Junior or senior classification.
Discussion of animal behavior with emphasis on developing an understanding of the reasons domesticated animals react the way they do toward their kind and to humans. The laboratory will be used for observation of behavior patterns in animals. Solutions for unusual behavior include behavior modification techniques. Staff.

ANSC 31100 Animal Breeding
Class 3, Lab. 2, Cr. 4. Prerequisite: (AGRY 32000 or BIOL 24100) and (STAT 30100 or 50300).
Genetic principles and their applications in improvement of production efficiency in livestock. Professor T. Stewart and Dr. Lofgren.

ANSC 32400 Applied Animal Nutrition
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 22100.
Application of the principles of animal nutrition to the formulation and feeding of supplements and complete rations for animals; ration ingredients and substitution values; computer applications; legal aspects of feed formulation; and industry practices. Professor Radcliffe.

ANSC 33200 Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals
Class 2, Cr. 2. Prerequisite: ANSC 23000.
Interactions of environmental factors with physiological processes in domestic animals. Professor Allrich.

ANSC 33300 Physiology of Reproduction
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 23000 or (BIOL 20300 and 20400).
Basic information on the physiological processes of reproduction. Professors Cabot and K. Stewart.

ANSC 33400 Physiology of Reproduction Laboratory
Lab. 2, Cr. 1. Prerequisite or corequisite: ANSC 33300.
Anatomical structures, physiological processes, and techniques concerned with animal reproduction. Staff.

ANSC 34500 Animal Health Management
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 22100 and 23000.
The objectives of this course are to familiarize the student with disease processes, and mechanisms. Management techniques in food, companion and research species that minimize or prevent disease will be emphasized, as well as the consequences on animal production, reproduction, and human health. Professor Allrich.

ANSC 35100 Meat Science
Class 3, Cr. 3. Junior or senior classification.
Study of muscle and meat, principles involved in the conversion of living animals to meat and by-products; efficient utilization of all types of meat as food. Staff.

ANSC 35101 Meat Science Laboratory
Lab. 2, Cr. 1. Prerequisite or corequisite: ANSC 35100.
Application of scientific principles to the meat industry, with emphasis on all aspects of processing including: harvest; carcass grading and evaluation; fabrication; cured, smoked, and comminuted meat products; quality control; product development; and retail and food service merchandising. Staff.

ANSC 37000 Livestock Evaluation*
Lab 6, Cr. 2. Junior or senior classification.
This course is designed to develop logical thinking and speaking skills, while developing the ability to critically evaluate livestock in their production environments. Prior experience in public speaking or judging is not required. Combination of ANSC 37000, 37100, 37200, 47000, 47100 and 47200 cannot exceed 3 credits towards ANSC electives. Requires class trips. Students pay lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Mr. Claeys.

ANSC 37100 Dairy Evaluation*
Lab 6, Cr. 2. Sophomore, junior or senior classification.
This course will enable the student to become familiar with breeds of dairy, parts of dairy cattle and their relationship to function. Opportunities will exist to associate with people from various breed organizations within the dairy industry. Combination of ANSC 37000, 37100, 37200, 47000, 47100 and 47200 cannot exceed 3 credits towards ANSC electives. Requires class trips. Students pay lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Mr. Hendress.

ANSC 37200 Horse Evaluation*
Lab 6, Cr. 2. Sophomore, junior or senior classification.
A student-centered laboratory course designed to familiarize students with functional horse conformation and type that maximizes athletic ability, applies selection criteria established by national breed associations for evaluating performance events, and prepares students to select halter and performance horses of many breeds and disciplines. Combination of ANSC 37000, 37100, 37200, 47000, 47100 and 47200 cannot exceed 3 credits towards ANSC electives. Requires class trips. Students pay lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Professor Russell.

ANSC 38100 Leadership for a Diverse Workplace
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: AGR 20100 or a course on the College of Agriculture Multicultural Awareness list. Junior or senior classification in animal agribusiness or animal production or animal products or animal sciences major.
An interactive small group discussion class covering effective interpersonal and group skills needed to enhance career satisfaction in a diverse workplace including building networks within industry, cross-cultural communication and gaining experiences in group problem-solving and decision making. Professor Russell.

ANSC 39000 Animal Sciences Internship
Cr. 0. Prerequisite: Enrolled in Animal Agribusiness or Animal Production or Animal Products or Animal Science major.
Internships with producers, businesses, or agencies arranged in cooperation with faculty coordinator. Permission of department required. Professor Diekman and Mr. Delks.

ANSC 39300 Animal Industry Travel Course*
Class 0-1, Lab. 2, Cr. 1-2.
A classroom and travel course designed to expose students to animal production operations, agribusinesses, industry leaders, and their philosophies throughout various geographical areas of the United States. Travel is conducted during spring break and includes visits to animal production farms, universities, and agribusinesses. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits; limited to two credits toward Animal Sciences electives; offered in odd numbered years. Additional fee required. Staff.

ANSC 40000 Animal Sciences Study Abroad
Credit 0-8.
Utilized to record credits earned through participation in Purdue study abroad programs with cooperating foreign universities. May be repeated for credit. Staff.

ANSC 40400 Animal Welfare
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Junior or senior classification.
A multi-disciplinary course that introduces students to the fields of animal welfare and the ethics of animal use. The course will emphasize farm animal welfare and production issues. Staff.

ANSC 43500 Reproductive Management of Farm Animals
Class 2, Lab. 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 33300.
Management practices associated with improved reproductive efficiency. Procedures for diagnosis of reproductive failure and practical methods of controlling reproduction will be identified. Professor K. Stewart.

ANSC 44000 Horse Management
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Current breeding, feeding, housing, selection, disease control, and other management practices essential for sound economic planning of horse operations in today's horse industry. Laboratory farm visits provide students with real application examples and industry contacts. Professor Russell.

ANSC 44100 Beef Management
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Breeding, feeding, and management practices essential for economical beef production, including performance testing. Professor Lemenager.

ANSC 44200 Sheep Management
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Breeding, feeding, and management practices essential for economical sheep production and commercial lamb feeding, including performance testing. Dr. Neary.

ANSC 44300 Swine Management
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Breeding, feeding, and management practices essential for commercial swine production, including performance testing. Professor Schinckel.

ANSC 44400 Dairy Management*
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Current breeding, feeding, physiology, disease prevention, and management practices essential for economical milk production. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Staff.

ANSC 44500 Commercial Poultry Management*
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
Current developments and practices in the commercial production of eggs, broilers, and turkeys; principles of breeding, physiology, nutrition, management, and disease prevention. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Professor Hester.

ANSC 44600 Companion Animal Management
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: (ANSC 22100 and 23000) and (junior or senior classification).
This course details understanding of the economic scope of the pet industry as well as the role of pets in American society. The students will acquire the information to be responsible pet owners by expanding their knowledge of housing practices, nutritional care, health care, behavior, and breeding of companion animals. Professor Allrich.

ANSC 47000 Livestock Judging*
Lab. 3, Cr. 1. Prerequisite: ANSC 37000.
This course is designed to teach livestock evaluation, relationship of production data to live animal evaluation characteristics, expand logical thinking and reasoning skills, and enhance oral communication skills. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Mr. Claeys.

ANSC 47100 Dairy Judging*
Lab. 3, Cr. 1. Prerequisite: ANSC 37100.
Opportunities will exist to allow the student to practice analysis and enhance decision-making processes in placing animals in collegiate dairy contests. Communication skills will be developed to properly present and defend those decisions with confidence. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Mr. Hendress.

ANSC 47200 Horse Judging*
Lab 3, Cr. 1. Prerequisite: ANSC 37200.
An intensive capstone experience for those students wishing to apply their knowledge of functional horse conformation, athletic ability, selection criteria established by national breed associations, and develop advanced decision making, communication, and experience working within a team environment by preparing and competing in national judging contests. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Professor Russell.

ANSC 48100 Contemporary Issues in Animal Sciences
Class 1, Cr. 1. Junior or senior classification.
Industry-led and student-led discussions and debate of current issues facing animal industries. Topics include environmental impact, food safety, animal care and well-being, ethics, use of biotechnology, world food supply, and international agricultural trade. Industry representatives will share their experiences of the importance of good communication skills as well as technical knowledge of issues that are of concern to animal industries. Students will share their experiences with each other from course work, internships, research problems, study abroad and club activities as they address contemporary issues facing animal industries. Professor Mathew and Mr. Delks.

ANSC 48500 Dairy Farm Evaluation*
Leb. 1, lab 2, Cr. 2. Prerequisite: ANSC 44400 and junior or senior classification.
This course will provide students with an opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of dairy cattle management systems, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, milk quality, animal handling, physical farm facilities, manure handling and management, personnel and their financial implications. Students will develop critical analysis skills and apply troubleshooting principles in the identification and resolution of dairy farm management issues in a learning environment that is structured around farm evaluation field trips and case studies. Requires class trips. Students will pay individual lodging or meal expenses when necessary. Staff.

ANSC 49100 Special Problems 
Cr. 1-3.
Supervised individual laboratory or library assignments. Written reports required. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Requires approval of department head. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits with approval of department head. Staff.

ANSC 49200 Special Assignments
Cr. 0.
Reading, discussions, written reports, seminar presentations, teaching, field or laboratory experiences provided for enrichment in special areas of animal science. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Approval of department head required. Staff.

ANSC 49300 Special Assignments
Cr. 1-3.
Reading, discussions, written reports, seminar presentations, teaching, field or laboratory experiences provided for enrichment in special areas of animal science. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Approval of department head required. Combination of ANSC 29300 and 49300 can not exceed six credits. Pass/No Pass grading option only. Staff.

ANSC 49400 Animal/Food Security: International Service Learning
Cr. 1-4. Prerequisite: One course from the Multicultural Awareness list. Restrictions: Junior or senior classification.
This course prepares students for a service learning international experience and includes the planning of the trip, the actual trip and a reflective learning post-trip class (currently Romania and Haiti). The course is a partnership between Purdue Animal Sciences, a host university and their students, a local community organization, and an international community development, NGO. The core of the experience is the faculty-led international service learning course where students live and work in villages in a developing country. Students will learn extension methodologies and how to contribute to sustainable community projects through the application of agricultural ecology, animal well-being focused management, and community development projects. Students will be expected to work in bi-national teams across agricultural and community disciplines to not only contribute to the communities served but to apply their classroom knowledge and experience to make a difference in the community. AGEC 34000 (Introduction to World Agricultural Development) is a highly recommended prerequisite.

ANSC 49500 Special Topics in Animal Sciences
Cr. 0-3.
Lecture presentation of specialized material not available in the formal courses of the department. The specific topic that is offered will be indicated on the student's record. Approval of department head required. May be repeated for credit. Staff.

ANSC 49900 Thesis Research
Cr. 1-6. Prerequisite: Admission to honors program. Enrolled in animal agribusiness or animal products or animal production or animal science major.
For students doing specialized animal sciences research; report required. Arrange with academic adviser and honors research coordinator before registering. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit with variable title. Staff. 

Dual Level/Undergraduate-Graduate


ANSC 51100 Population Genetics (AGRY/FNR 51100)

Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: AGRY 32000 or BIOL 24100. Corequisite: STAT 50300. Junior or senior classification.
Basic concepts of population and quantitative genetics. Characterization of populations using gene frequencies, genetic and zygotic disequilibrium; forces changing gene frequencies (mutation, migration, selection, and random genetic drift) and genotypic frequencies (mating systems: inbreeding, crossbreeding, and phenotypic assortative) and related hypothesis testing: gene trees and the coalescent process; molecular phylogenies. One semester of principles of genetics is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Muir.

ANSC 51300 Design of Animal Breeding Programs
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 31100 and STAT 50300. Junior or senior classification.
Integration of principles of animal breeding and genetics into animal improvement programs. Emphasis is placed on the interaction among genetics, nutrition, and physiology. One semester of applied genetics and population genetics is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Schinckel.

ANSC 51400 Animal Biotechnology
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: AGRY 32000 or BIOL 24100 or BIOL 28000, and BCHM 30700. Junior or senior classification.
Presentation and discussion of the history and application of molecular genetics and molecular biology to the analysis of animal genomes and the use of gene transfer in research, animal agriculture, and human medicine. Ethical and economical ramifications of biotechnology in society will be introduced through reading assignments and discussion. A semester of genetics and general biochemistry is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Bidwell.

ANSC 52200 Monogastric Nutrition
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 22100 and (BCHM 30700 or CHM 33300). Junior or senior classification.
Digestion and absorption, nutrient utilization, and interrelationships in poultry, swine, and other monogastric animals. A semester of animal nutrition and general biochemistry is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Adeola.

ANSC 52400 Ruminant Nutrition and Physiology
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 22100 and (BCHM 30700 or CHM 33300). Junior or senior classification.
Physiological, microbiological, and biochemical aspects of digestion and metabolism in the ruminant animal. A semester of animal nutrition and general biochemistry is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Schoonmaker.

ANSC 53400 Advanced Reproductive Physiology
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 33300. Junior or senior classification.
A study of mechanisms that interact to control reproduction in farm animals. Current scientific literature and hypotheses are presented, and potential methods to enhance reproductive efficiency are examined. A semester of reproductive physiology is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Machaty.

ANSC 53500 Avian Physiology (BMS 52800)
Class 2, Cr. 2. Prerequisites: ANSC 23000 or (BIOL 20300 and 20400). Junior or senior classification.
A study of the basic principles of physiology and functional anatomy of birds. Topics include the following systems: muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, lymphoid, endocrine, and reproductive. A course or courses that cover all of the systems of the body should be completed prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professors Asem and Hester.

ANSC 53600 The Digestive System in Health and Disease
Class 2, Cr. 2. Prerequisite: BCHM 56100. Junior or senior classification.
Comparative study of the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract focused on the importance of, and interactions between, gut physiology, gut associated immune system and intestinal microorganisms in relation to health and disease. Offered in odd-numbered years. One semester of graduate level general biochemistry is strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Professor Patterson.

ANSC 53700 Adipocyte Biology
Class 2. Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 23000 and BCHM 30700. Junior or senior classification.
Provide the student with a conceptual background in the development of adipose tissue and its biological function; with emphasis on the endocrine and immunologic aspects of the adipocyte. Differences between species will be emphasized where possible. Professor Ajuwon.

ANSC 55100 Muscle Development, Physiology, and Chemistry
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 23000, 30100, or 35100, and (BCHM 30700 or CHM 33300). Junior or senior classification.
The chemical and physical properties of muscle, including growth and development, ultrastructure, contraction, energy metabolism, and transformation to meat. Offered in even-numbered years. A semester of systemic physiology and biochemistry are strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Permission of instructor required. Staff.

ANSC 55500 Mechanisms of Animal Growth Development
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: (BCHM 30700 or CHM 33300) and (ANSC 30100 or BIOL 23100). Junior or senior classification.
A study of the molecular and cellular processes controlling embryonic development and growth of domesticated animals. Includes discussions of current research concerning molecular mechanisms of fertilization, egg activation, and early development and endocrine factors controlling cell growth, differentiation and tissue formation, and turnover. Experimental approaches utilized for developmental and growth biology research are discussed. A semester of cell biology and biochemistry are strongly recommended prior to taking this course as a graduate student. Staff.

ANSC 55600 Stem Cell Biology
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: BIOL 23100 and (AGRY 32000 or BIOL 24100). Junior or senior classification.
Adult or tissue stem cells are stem cells that reside in different tissues and, depending on where they are from, have different properties. The proposed graduate level course aims to cover the origin, identification, isolation, differentiation, self-renewal, and senescence of various tissue-specific stem cells and their function in animal tissue growth and maintenance. This course will focus on the latest advances in adult stem cells and their applications in tissue regeneration. Professor Kuang.

ANSC 59500 Advanced Animal Welfare Assessment
Class 2, Lab. 2, Cr. 3.
This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of animal welfare science as it pertains to welfare assessment strategies by engaging them in discussion of core papers pertaining to the science of animal welfare. Staff.

ANSC 59500 Advanced Meat Science
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 35100 and BCHM 30700.
Meat and meat products contribute essential nutrients, such as protein, vitamins and minerals to the diet that are crucial for human health. Muscle is the primary component of meat, and thus understanding muscle structure, muscle biology and muscle biochemistry is a fundamental step toward discussing advanced meat science and current technology adopted in the meat industry. In this course, comprehensive coverage in meat science and muscle biology/biochemistry, meat technology, and processing application will be examined through critical reading of literature, classroom lecture/discussion, written assignments, and/or student projects. Professor Kim.

ANSC 59500 Mammary Gland Biology and Lactation
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: ANSC 23000.
Lactation is critical to successful reproduction of mammals as milk is the only supply of water and nutrients for their neonates. In this course, the fundamentals of mammary development and lactation from its evolutionary originas to physiological mechanisms will be examined through critical reading of literature, classroom lecture/discussion, written assignments, and student projects. Professors Casey and K. Stewart.

ANSC 59500 Special Topics in Animal Sciences
Cr. 0-3. Junior or senior classification.
Lecture presentation of specialized material not available in the formal courses of the department. The specific topic that is offered is indicated on the student's record. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit. Staff.

Graduate Level Courses

ANSC 61100 Quantitative Genetics (AGRY 61100)
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: AGRY (ANSC) 51100 and STAT 51200.
Continuation of AGRY (ANSC) 51100. Quantitative genetics in animals and plants. Genotypic and environmental variances; covariances between relatives; single- and multiple-trait selection and correlated responses; genotype-environment interaction. Inbreeding and crossbreeding: means, variances, heterosis, intra- and inter-population improvement. Staff.

ANSC 61200 Advanced Population Genetics
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisites: ANSC 51100 or BIOL 58000 and one course in calculus.
Examination of genetic mechanisms influencing maintenance of genetic polymorphism, rate of evolution and speciation, limits to natural and artificial selection, species stability, and altruistic traits. Professor Muir.

ANSC 62000 Proteins and Amino Acids in Nutrition
Class 3, Cr. 3. Prerequisite: BCHM 56200.
Presentation of concepts concerning requirements for dietary amino acids, nutritional regulation of amino acid metabolism, and regulation of protein metabolism. Integrates biochemical and physiological functions of amino acids and features topics in nutritional regulation of whole-body protein turnover in mammalian and avian species. Offered in odd numbered years. Professor Adeola.

ANSC 62500 Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology I (F&N 60500)
Class 4, Cr. 4.
This course provides a foundation in nutrition concepts, nutritional biochemistry and physiology particularly important to nutrition. Skills important to graduate education, including critical thinking skills, reading current literature, writing lay and scientific works, and several types of presentation skills will be emphasized. Professors Fleet and Teegarden.

ANSC 62600 Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology II (F&N 60600).
Class 2, Cr. 2.
Continuation of ANSC 59500. Muscle and adipose tissue growth will be emphasized. This course will examine the post-absorptive use of nutrients for energy and for the synthesis of macromolecules. Discussions will address whole animal energetics and protein metabolism, the role of major organs in nutrient metabolism, and the influence of hormones and nutrients as regulatory signals. The integration of nutrient metabolism in different physiological states will be addressed. Professors Mills, Donkin and Ajuwon.

ANSC 62700 Nutritional Biochemistry and Physiology III (F&N 60700).
Class 2, Cr. 2.
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in the pathology and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Professor Burgess.

ANSC 68100 Animal Sciences Graduate Seminar
Class 1, Cr. 1. May be repeated for credit.
Presentations by graduate students on topics of interest in animal sciences. Professors Mathew and Mills.

ANSC 69100 Topical Research Problems
Cr. 1-4. To be arranged with individual staff members prior to registration. Requires department head approval.
Supervised individual research projects. Written reports required.

ANSC 69800 Research M.S. Thesis.
Cr. 1-18. Permission of instructor required.

ANSC 69900 Research Ph.D. Thesis.
Cr. 1-18. Permission of instructor required.​​​
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Department of Animal Sciences, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA, (765) 494-4808

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