William Muir

 

William Muir's Main Page

Research Program

My research program mainly consists of two major research thrusts: 1) Genetic methods to improve adaptability, stress resistance, and animal well-being and 2) the interface of quantitative and molecular genetics.

Genetic methods to improve adaptability, stress resistance, and animal well-being. Aggression and competitive interactions are a universal fact of life occurring among and between all living organisms and results in correlated effects among interacting individuals, yet with the exception of litter and maternal effects, application of classical quantitative genetic theory assumes independence. These interactions have profound impacts on both productivity and welfare of all animal species, and unfortunately, may be magnified in confined rearing management systems. Because classical models ignore social interactions, it is not surprising that classic theory fails to explain why some traits do not respond to selection, even though there is a positive heritability and effective selection differential. These same interactions are essentially the only limitation as to which species can be domesticated. Understanding how to account for and reduce competitive interactions in artificial breeding programs would greatly increase response to selection, and expand the range of species that can be domesticated; such as carnivorous and/or cannibalistic shell- and game-fish, and also improve animal well-being of those species that have been domesticated.

My long term research project has been examination of multi-level selection methods to improve animal well-being and productivity. Because selection directly on behavior traits would be labor intensive, expensive, and perhaps ineffective or have negative impacts on productivity, I did not think that approach was likely to yield a workable solution that could be utilized by industry. Instead, I wanted a breeding method that could be easily implemented by breeders, cost effective, and improve profitability while at the same time improve animal-well-being. While this seemed like an impossible task, selection based on among group performance, rather than individual productivity, appeared to be the answer. As proof of concept I initiated a selection program when I first came to Purdue in 1981 based on group performance of non-beak trimmed birds. Results were stunning and easily achieved. Within 5 generations of selection, mortality reduced from over 60% to 8%, which is the same as that in single bird cages, while at the same time rate of lay improved 16%. The research also showed that current practices of selecting for improved productivity based on individuals productivity is detrimental to productivity at the population level due to competitive interactions. The research was recognized by the highest awards presented by the American Poultry Science Association including the Animal Well-Being Award in 1996 and the Merck Research Award for Achievement in 1997. This method of selection is now being employed by all commercial layer breeders in the world.

Group selection is based entirely on between group variation and ignores within group variation, whereas individual selection ignores group performance. An optimal selection method would separate the direct and associative effects and weight each according to the variance-covariance structure as per classic selection index theory. I recently developed such an index using mixed model methods. These methods allow direct estimation of genetic parameters associated with the model.

In summary, my research has shown how to design effective breeding methods when social interactions exists, without which, response to selection will at best be less than optimal, and at worst could be negative. Experimental results with group selection and mixed model methods showed that both methods had positive and sometimes extraordinary improvements as compared to convention individual selection. Selection among family groups always works, but may result in higher levels of inbreeding. Mixed model methods may be easier to implement in breeding programs because only one more item of information is needed, i.e. which group each individual was reared in.

Biotechnology Risk Assessment. Because transgenic technology offers potential economic benefits associated with production of agronomic species, such as insect or herbicide resistance in plants or enhanced growth and production in animals, there is tremendous pressure to introduce new transgenic organisms into agriculture. However, anthropogenic introduction of exotic organisms into natural communities is a major concern of ecologists because exotics could adversely affect communities in many ways including eliminating populations of species including wild type conspecifics of the transgenic organism. Since the advent of genetic engineering, release of transgenic organisms into natural environments poses additional ecological risks because transgenic individuals retain most of the characteristics of their wild type counterparts while possessing some novel advantage. To evaluate environmental risks of transgenic organisms, regulatory agencies need methods to access risk before release, because once released, the impact may be permanent and irreversible.

The objective of my research was to develop a mathematical model, based on population genetic theory that would allow such risks to be determined from parameters measured in a secure laboratory setting. To access risk, it is necessary to examine the transgene’s impact on all aspects the life cycle. We divided the mechanisms by which the frequency of a transgene in a population could be altered into five selection components: viability (differential ability of genotypes to survive to sexual maturity and beyond), fecundity (reproductive capacity of adult females), fertility (sperm production and sperm viability of adult males), developmental rate (early growth rate and age at sexual maturity) and sexual selection (differential ability to attract or compete for mates). We developed a general model to predict changes in population number and gene frequency incorporating all five selection components.

We developed and tested an experimental design to estimate these selection components in wild type and transgenic individuals using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small cyprinodont fish, as a model organism. One-cell medaka zygotes were microinjected with a construct containing the human growth hormone gene (hGH) driven by the Atlantic salmon growth hormone (sGH) promoter. Our experiments showed that transgenic young had a reduced early viability relative to wild type (30%); however, surviving transgenic hatchlings grew at a faster rate (20%) than wild type until about the age of sexual maturity, and adult transgenic females produced more eggs (20%) in each clutch than did wild type females. Developmental advantages resulted in reduced cannibalism on young and a decreased generation interval; enhanced fecundity resulted in increased offspring production. With respect to mating behavior, laboratory experiments were conducted using natural body size variation of same-aged wild type fish. Large males obtained a four-fold advantage in mating success relative to small males. The mating advantage occurred because large males were preferred as mates by females and because large males could control access to sexually receptive females better than small males could.

In general, our model showed that a transgene can increase in a population in several ways. Results also showed that the interaction of fitness component effects could offset each other. Relative to risk, the model showed that if sexual selection favors transgenic fish, while viability selection favors non-transgenic fish, a potentially dangerous situation can develop whereby the transgene is driven into the population by male mating advantages, but average fitness of the population decreases and causes population extinction. Results of our study show which parameters are critical for risk assessment and which characteristics need to be measured in commercial programs before any release is attempted. Some combinations of fitness components have a high potential to increase risk.

Published Work

Refereed papers, proceedings, book chapters, full length papers

  1. Muir, W.M. and M. Grossman. 1973. A linear egg counting stage for use with Tribolium. Tribolium Info. Bull 16:113-114.

  2. Grossman, M. and W.M. Muir. 1974. Comparison of methods of counting Tribolium eggs. Tribolium Info. Bull 17:94-100.

  3. Muir, W.M. and B.A. Rasmusen. 1974. A combined estimate of recombination between the genes for C and J blood groups in pigs. Animal Blood Groups and Biochemical Genetics 1975. 5:144-l45.

  4. Grossman, M. and W.M. Muir. 1975. Comparison of sifting methods for recovering Tribolium eggs from floor medium. Tribolium Info. Bull 16:75-78.

  5. Hays, V.W. and W.M. Muir. 1979. Efficiency and safety of feed additive use of antibacterial drugs in animal production. Canadian Journal Animal Science. 59:447-456.

  6. Lane, L.G., G.R. Ammerman, R.G. Lane and W.M. Muir. 1979. A comparison of the influence of thermal processing and broiling on naturally occurring and spiked residue of DDT and its metabolites in ground beef. J. of Agric. and Food Chem. 27:1156-1159.

  7. Kells, J.J., C.E. Reich, R.L. Blevens and W.M. Muir. 1980. Atrazine dissipation as affected by surface pH and tillage. Weed Science 28:101-104.

  8. Kells, J.J., R.L. Blevins, C.E. Reich and W.M. Muir. 1980. Effect of pH, nitrogen and tillage on weed control and corn yield. Weed Science 28:719-721.

  9. Lane, R.H., W.M. Muir and S.G. Mullins. 1980. Correlation of minimum sensory doneness with internal temperature of deep fat fried chicken thighs. Poultry Science 59:719-723.

  10. Lane, R.H., W.M. Muir and S.G. Mullins. 1980. The influence of fryer temperature on fry time of deep-fat fried chicken thighs. Poultry Science 59:2467-2469.

  11. Stewart, P.A., W.M. Muir, J.J. Begin and T.H. Johnson. 1980. Feed efficiency and gain responses to protein levels in two lines of birds selected for metabolic rate. Poultry Science 59:2692-2696.

  12. Sutton, C.D., W.M. Muir and J.J. Begin. 1980. Effect of fiber on cholesterol metabolism in the Coturnix quail. Poultry Science 60:812-817.

  13. Muir, W.M. and A.E. Bell. 1981. Estimation of effective generation interval in Drosophila population cages. Genetica 55:33-37.

  14. Thomas, B.B., J.A. Boling and W.M. Muir. 1981. Serum calcium, phosphorus and magnesium response to massive dosing of cholecalciferol (CC) and 25-OH-CC in young and aged ewes. Int. J. Vet. and Nut. Res. 51:365-372.

  15. Muir, W.M. and A.E. Bell. 1981. Effect of cage type on effective generation interval in continuous populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetica 56:23-26.

  16. Stewart, P.A. and W.M. Muir. 1982. The effect of varying protein levels on carcass composition and nutrient utilization in two lines of chicken divergently selected for O2 consumption. Poultry Science 61:1-11.

  17. Muir, W.M., H.W. Chin, A.B. Young and Y. Maruyama. 1982. Proper design and analysis of clinical trials of malignant glioma. Cancer Treat. Rep. 66:211-213.

  18. Maruyama, Y., J. Yoneda, J.R. Van Nagell, E.S. Donaldson, M. Hanson, D. Powell and W. Muir. 1982. Tumor regression and histological clearance after neutron brachytherapy for large localized cervical carcinomas by combined radiation and surgery. Cancer 50:2802-2809.

  19. Maruyama, Y., J.M. Feola and W.M. Muir. 1983. l,3 Bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea treatment of spontaneous radiogenic C57BL mouse leukemia/lymphomia. GANN 74:426-434.

  20. Bell, A.E., W.M. Muir, D. Olson and G. Searcy. 1983. Performance of dwarf and normal laying hens as influenced by protein level and cage density. Poultry Science 62:2130-2137.

  21. Sutton, D.C., W.M. Muir and G. Mitchell. 1983. Effect of dietary cholesterol and genotype on cholesterol metabolism in roosters. Poultry Science 62:1606-1611.

  22. Maruyama, Y. and W.M. Muir. 1984. Human cervical cancer clearance after 252 Cf neutron brachytherapy versus conventional photon brachytherapy. American Journal of Clinical Oncology 7:347-352.

  23. Maruyama, Y. and W.M. Muir. 1984. Importance of tumor clearance rate. Int. J. of Radiation Oncology 10:331-332.

  24. Sutton, C.D., W.M. Muir and G.E. Mitchell, Jr. 1984. Cholesterol metabolism in the laying hen as influenced by dietary cholesterol, caloric intake, and genotype. Poultry Science 63:972-980.

  25. Sutton, C.D., W.M. Muir and G.E. Mitchell, Jr. 1985. The effect of dietary cholesterol, energy intake, and oxygen consumption on cholesterol metabolism in the chick. Poultry Science 64:502-507.

  26. Muir, W.M. 1986. Use of logistic equation to characterize the efficiency of a population to utilize feed. Tribolium Info. Bull 25:75-77.

  27. Muir, W.M., J.C. Rogler and D.D. Linton. 1986. Soymill feed as a fiber source to reduce energy intake in experimental rations. Nutrition Reports International 32:737-742.

  28. Patterson, D.L. and W.M. Muir. 1986. Magnitude of genetic influence, cage type and genotype by cage-type interactions on soft-shell and shell-less egg production. Poultry Science 65:26-33.

  29. Muir, W.M. 1986. Relative efficiency of selection for performance of birds housed in colony cages based on production in single bird cages. Poultry Science 64:2239-2247.

  30. Muir, W.M. 1986. Efficient design and analysis of selection experiments (Invitational Paper). Proc. 3rd World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production XII: 269-282.

  31. Muir, W.M. 1986. Optimal utilization of control populations for additional information and accuracy. Biometrics 42:381-392.

  32. Muir, W.M. and A.E. Bell. 1987 Multiple vital functions of the daughterless (da) gene in Drosophila melanogaster and factors influencing its expression. Genetica 72:43-54.

  33. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1989. Fearful and associated responses of caged White Leghorn hens: genetic parameter estimates. Poultry Science 68:1040-1046.

  34. Xu, S. and W.M. Muir. 1990. The application of ridge regression to multiple trait selection indices. Journal Animal Breeding and Genetics 107:81-88.

  35. Muir, W.M. and D.L. Patterson. 1990. Genetic and environmental associations of uncollectible egg production with shell quality, rate of lay, and erratic timing of oviposition in White Leghorn hens. Poultry Science 69:509-516.

  36. Muir, W.M. 1990. Association between persistency of lay and part record egg production in White Leghorn hens and implications to selection programs for annual egg. Poultry Science 69:1447-1460.

  37. Muir, W.M. and S. Xu. 1991. A method for optimum independent culling level selection for N traits with explicit solutions. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 82:457-465.

  38. Kuo, F.L., J.V. Craig and W.M. Muir. 1991. Selection and beak-trimming effects on behavior, cannibalism and short-term production traits in White Leghorn pullets. Poultry Science 70:1057-1068.

  39. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1991. Research Note: Genetic adaptation to multiple-bird cage environment is less evident with effective beak trimming. Poultry Science 70: 2214-2217.

  40. Xu, S. and W.M. Muir. 1991. Multi-stage selection for genetic gain by orthogonal transformation. Genetics 129:963-974.

  41. Muir, W.M. 1991. Estimation of response to selection in non-replicated populations. pp. 95-121 in: Proc. Forty-First National Breeders Roundtable.

  42. Xu, S. and W.M. Muir. 1992. Selection index updating. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 83:451-458.

  43. Muir, W. M., Y. Nyquist and S. Xu. 1992. Alternative partitioning of the genotype by environment interaction. Theor. and Appl. Gen. 84:193-200.

  44. Muir, W.M. and S. Xu. 1992. Optimizing profits in Breeding programs using selection index updating. pp. 707-711. Proc. XIX World's Poultry Congress.

  45. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1993. Selection for reduction of Beak-inflicted injuries among caged hens. Poultry Science 72:411-420.

  46. Muir, W.M. 1993. Selection index updating with applications to beef cattle breeding. Proceeding American Society of Animal Sciences.

  47. Muir, W.M. 1994. Poultry Improvement: Integration of present and new genetic approaches for layers. V20 pp. 5-12 in: Proc. of The 5th Worlds Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production.

  48. Muir, W.M. R Howard, and C. Bidwell. 1994. Use of multigenerational studies to assess genetic stability, fitness, and competitive ability of transgenic Japanese medaka: I. Methodology In Proc of Biotechnology Risk Assessment Symposium: eds. Levin, M. C. Grim and J. Angle. pp. 170-193.

     

  49. Xu, S. W. Atchley and W. Muir. 1994. Partial and conditional maximum likelihood for variance-component estimation. Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 111:178-188.

  50. Xu, S, W.R. Atchley, and W.M. Muir. 1994. Multistage selection incorporating information from relatives. In The 5th Worlds Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production V 18: pp. 463-466.

  51. Xu, S. T.G. Martin and W.M. Muir. 1995. Multistage selection for maximum economic return with application to beef cattle. Journal Animal Science 73:699-710.

  52. Muir, W.M., R. Martens, R. Howard, C. Bidwell. 1995. Use of multigenerational studies to assess genetic stability, fitness, and competitive ability of transgenic Japanese medaka: II. Development of Transgenic Medaka and Mating preferences: M. Levin, C. Grim, and J. Angle. Proc. of 7th International Conference on Risk Assessment Methodologies. pp. 140-149.

  53. Muir, W.M. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Selection program and direct responses. Poultry Science 75:447-458.

  54. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Beak-related mortality, feathering. and body weight responses. Poultry Science 75:294-302.

  55. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Behavioral responses. Poultry Science 75:1145-1155.

  56. Stuart, J.J., M.J. DeGortari, P.S. Hall, M.E. Maxwell, G. Mocelin, S.J. Brown, W.M. Muir. 1996. Useful DNA polymorphisms are identified by snapback, a med-repetitive element in Tribolium castaneum. Genome 39:568-578.

  57. Fairfull, R.W. and W.M. Muir. 1996. Selection and breeding of laying hens: Present and future solutions. XX World's Poultry Congress 1:395-415.

  58. Hester, P.Y., W.M. Muir, J.V. Craig, and J.L. Albright. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Production traits during heat and cold exposure. Poultry Science 308-1314.

  59. Hester, P.Y., W.M. Muir, J.V. Craig, and J.L. Albright. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Hematology and Adrenal function. Poultry Science 75:1295-1307.

  60. Hester, P.Y., W.M. Muir, J.V. Craig. 1996. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages: Humeral Immune responses. Poultry Science 75:1315-1320.

  61. Muir, W.M., R. D. Howard, R. S. Martens, S. Schulte, and C. A. Bidwell. 1996. Use Of Multigenerational Studies To Assess Genetic Stability, Fitness, And Competitive Ability Of Transgenic Japanese Medaka: III. Results And Predictions in M. Levin, C. Grim, and J. Angle eds. 8th International Conference on Risk Assessment Methodologies. pp. 354-356.

  62. Muir, W.M. 1997. Candidate gene selection. Symposium: Critical Topics in Animal Sciences. Animal Sciences 3: 79-91.

  63. Fairfull, R. W. and W.M. Muir. 1997. Quantitative Genetics versus Molecular Genetics in Poultry Breeding. Symposium: Critical Topics in Animal Sciences. Animal Sciences 3: 52-78.

  64. Muir, W.M. 1997. Genetic Selection- Strategies for the future. Poultry Science 76:1066-1070.

  65. Craig, J.V. and W.M. Muir. 1998. Genetic Influences on the Behavior of Chickens Associated with Welfare and Productivity. In: Genetics and the Behavior of Domestic Animals. Ed. Temple Grandin. Academic Press, pp. 265-299, San Diego, CA.

  66. Hicks, C., W.M. Muir and D.A. Stick. 1998. Selection index updating for maximum rate of annual genetic gain in laying hens. Poultry Science 77:1-7.

  67. Muir, W.M. and D. Stick. 1998. Relative advantage of combining genes with major effects in breeding programs: simulation results. In: 6th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding. 26:357-360.

  68. Fairfull, R.W., I. McMillan, and W.M. Muir. 1998. Poultry breeding: progress and prospects for genetic improvement of egg and meat production. In: 6th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding, 24:271-278.

  69. Muir, W.M. and J.V. Craig. 1998. Improving Animal Well-Being Through Genetic Selection. Poultry Science 77:1781-1788.

  70. Muir, W.M. and R.D. Howard. 1999. Possible ecological risks of transgenic organism release when transgenes affect mating success: sexual selection and the Trojan gene hypothesis. Proceeds of National Academy of Science 4:13853-13856.

  71. Muir, W.M. 1999. Molecular Genetics in Poultry Breeding. Proc. International Symposium on Animal Breeding and Genetics. Eds. Lopes P.S, Euclydes RC, Torres RA, and Guimaraes, EF, pp. 243-268.

  72. Muir, W.M. 2000. Effect of genetic background on transgene expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes) and models to assess environmental risk of GMO's. Transgene Research 8:470-471.

  73. Muir, W.M. 2000. The interaction of selection intensity, inbreeding depression, and random genetic drift on short- and long-term response to selection: Results using finite locus and finite population size models incorporating directional dominance Proc. Am. Soc. Anim. Sci. 2000, Available at: http://www.asas.org/0602.pdf

  74. Muir, W.M. and R.D. Howard. 2001. Fitness Components and Ecological Risk of Transgenic Release: A Model Using Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) American Naturalist. 158: 1-16.

  75. Muir, W.M. and H. Hostetler. 2001. Transgenic Fish: Production, Testing, and Risk Assessment. in Biotechnology in Animal Husbandry, ed. R. Renaville and A. Burny. Kluwer Academic Press, Boston. 5:261-282.

  76. Schamber, EM. and W.M. Muir. 2001. Wright's Shifting Balance Theory of Evolution in Artificial Breeding Programs: Empirical Testing Using the Model Organism Tribolium castaneum. Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics. 118: 181-191.

  77. Cheng, H.W., Eicher, S.D., Chen, Y., Singleton, P. and Muir, W.M. 2001 Effect of genetic selection for group productivity and longevity on immunological and hematological parameters of chickens. Poultry Science 80:1079-1086.

  78. Cheng, H.W., Dillworth, G., Singleton, P., Chen, Y. and Muir, W.M. 2001 Effect of genetic selection for productivity and longevity on blood concentrations of serotonin, catecholamine and corticosterone of chickens. Poultry Science 80:1278-1285.

  79. Cheng, H. W., S. Etcher, Y. Chen, P. Singleton and M.W. Muir. 2001. Physiological Indicators of Birds' Well-being Related to Genetic Selection for Adaptability to Caged Production Systems. Proceedings of the Symposium on Animal Welfare Considerations in Livestock Housing Systems pp. 325-334.

  80. Muir, W.M. 2001. Group Selection Theory: Lessons learned from poultry with implications to swine breeding. Proceeding of National Swine Improvement Federation. December 6-7, St. Louis, MO.

  81. Muir, W.M. 2001. Methods for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified organisms: Need for risk assessment. SCOPE GM Food Controversy Forum. Science (online version).

  82. Muir, W.M. 2001. Example of the model. SCOPE GM Food Controversy Forum. Science (online version).

  83. Muir, W.M. and R.D. Howard. 2002. Methods to Assess Ecological Risks of Transgenic Fish Releases. In Genetically Engineered Organisms: Assessing Environmental and Human Health Effects Eds. D.K. Letourneau and B. E. Burrows. CRC Press, pp. 355-383.

  84. Muir, WM and R.D. Howard. 2002. Environmental Risk Assessment of Transgenic Fish with Implications for Other Diploid Organisms. Transgenic Research 11:101-114.

  85. Muir, W.M. 2002. Potential Environmental Risks and Hazards of Biotechnology. Part I: Risks and Hazards. http://www.isb.vt.edu/news/2001/news01.nov.html#nov0105. Information Systems For Biotechnology (online version)

  86. Muir, W.M. 2002. Potential Environmental Risks And Hazards Of Biotechnology. Part II: Methods to Estimate Risks and Hazards. http://www.isb.vt.edu/news/2002/news02.feb.html#feb0201. Information Systems For Biotechnology (online version).

  87. Muir, W.M. and A. Schinckel. 2002. Incorporation of competitive effects in breeding programs to improve productivity and animal well being. Proc. 7th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding 32:35-36.

  88. Muir, W.M. 2002. Use of molecular genetics in poultry breeding. Proc. 7th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding 30:193-200.

  89. NRC (National Research Council). 2002. Animal Biotechnology: Science Based Concerns. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

  90. Cheng, H.W., P. Singleton and W.M. Muir. 2002. Social stress in laying hens: Differential dopamine and corticosterone responses following intermingling of different genetic strain chickens. Poultry. Science 81:1265-1272.

  91. Cheng, H.W., P. Singleton and W.M. Muir. 2003. Social stress differentially regulates neuroendocrine responses in laying hens: I. Genetic basis of dopamine responses under three different social conditions. Psychoneuroendocrinology 28:597-611.

  92. Cheng, H.W., P. Singleton and W.M. Muir. 2003. Social stress in laying hens: Differential effect of stress on plasma dopamine concentrations and adrenal function in genetically selected chickens. Poultry Science 82:192-198.

  93. Muir, W.M. 2003. Indirect Selection for Improvement of Animal Well-Being. Chapter 14, pp. 247-256. In Poultry Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology Eds. WM Muir and S Aggrey. CABI Press Cambridge MA.

  94. Muir, W.M. 2003. Incorporating Molecular Information in Breeding Programs, Applications and Limitations. Chapter 28, pp. 549-562. In Poultry Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology Eds. WM Muir and S Aggrey. CABI Press Cambridge, MA.

  95. Hostetler, HA, SL Peck, and WM. Muir. 2003. High efficiency production of germ-line transgenic Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) by electroporation with direct current-shifted radio frequency pulses. Transgene Research 12: 413–424.

  96. Muir, W.M., D. Miles, and A.E. Bell. 2004. Long Term Selection Studies In Tribolium Castaneum, Alternative Selection Strategies, And Associated Nature Of Quantitative Genetic Variation. Plant Breeding Reviews 24(2):211-223.

  97. Howard, R.D., J.A. DeWoody, and W.M. Muir. 2004. Mating advantage of transgenic males provides opportunity for Trojan gene effect in a fish. Proceeds of National Academy of Science 101:2934-2938.

  98. Muir, W.M. 2004. The threats and benefits of GM fish. European Molecular Biology Organization EMBO 5:2-7.

  99. Cheng, H.W. and W.M. Muir. 2004. Chronic social stress differentially regulates neuroendocrine responses in laying hens: II. Genetic basis of adrenal responses under three different social conditions. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 97:961-971.

  100. Muir, W.M. and H. Cheng. 2004. Breeding for Productivity and Welfare. In: Welfare of the Laying Hen: Poultry Science Symposium Series, No. 27. Edited by G Perry. pp123-138. CABI Press Cambridge, MA..

  101. Muir, W. M. and R. D. Howard 2004. Characterization of environmental risk of genetically engineered (GE) organisms and their potential to control exotic invasive species. Aquatic Sciences 66: 414 –420

  102. Hostetler, HA, P. Collodi, RH Devlin, and WM Muir. 2005. Improved Phytate Phosphorus Utilization by Japanese Medaka Transgenic for the Aspergillus niger Phytase Gene. Zebrafish 2:19-31

  103. Muir, W. M., 2005 Incorporation of competitive effects in forest tree or animal breeding programs. Genetics 170: 1247-1259

  104. Pedra, J. H. F., R. A. Festucci-Buselli, W. L. Sun, W. M. Muir, M. E. Scharf et al., 2005 Profiling of abundant proteins associated with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane resistance in Drosophila melanogaster. Proteomics 5: 258-269

  105. Cheng, H., and W. M. Muir, 2005 The effects of genetic selection for survivability and productivity on chicken physiological homeostasis. Worlds Poultry Science Journal 61: 383-397

  106. Festucci-Buselli, R. A., A. S. Carvalho-Dias, M. de Oliveira-Andrade, C. Caixeta-Nunes, H. M. Li et al., 2005 Expression of Cyp6g1 and Cyp12d1 in DDT resistant and susceptible strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Insect Molecular Biology 14: 69-77

  107. Bijma, P. and W. M. Muir 2006. Genetic analysis and improvement of traits affected by interaction among individuals WCGALP 17:974-980

  108. Dennis, R. L., Muir, W. M., and Cheng, H. W. 2006. Effects of raclopride on aggression and stress in diversely selected chicken lines. Behavioural Brain Research, 175: 104-111.

  109. Devlin, R. H., Sundstrom, L. F., and Muir, W. M. 2006. Interface of biotechnology and ecology for environmental risk assessments of transgenic fish. Trends In Biotechnology, 24: 89-97.

  110. Muir, W.M. and P. Bijma. 2006. Incorporation of competitive effects in breeding programs for improved performance and animal well-being. WCGALP 17:806-812

  111. Sun, W., Margam, V. M., Sun, L., Buczkowski, G., Bennett, G. W., Schemerhorn, B., Muir, W. M., and Pittendrigh, B. R. 2006. Genome-wide analysis of phenobarbital-inducible genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Insect Molecular Biology, 15: 455-464.

  112. W.M. Muir, J. Romero-Severson, S.D. Rider Jr., A. Simons, and J. Ogas. 2006. Application of One Sided t-tests and a Generalized Experiment Wise Error Rate to High-Density Oligonucleotide Microarray Experiments: An Example Using Arabidopsis. J. Data Science 4, 323-341.

  113. Bijma, P., Muir, W. A., and Van Arendonk, J. A. M. 2007a. Multilevel selection 1: Quantitative genetics of inheritance and response to selection. Genetics, 175: 277-288.

  114. Bijma, P., Muir, W. M., Ellen, E. D., Wolf, J. B., and Van Arendonk, J. A. M. 2007b. Multilevel selection 2: Estimating the genetic parameters determining inheritance and response to selection. Genetics, 175: 289-299.

  115. Chen, K. F., Baxter, T., Muir, W. M., Groenen, M. A., and Schook, L. B. 2007. Genetic resources, genome mapping and evolutionary genomics of the pig (Sus scrofa). International Journal of Biological Sciences, 3: 153-165.

  116. Cheng, H. H., Zhang, Y., and Muir, W. M. 2007. Evidence for widespread epistatic interactions influencing Marek's disease virus viremia levels in chicken. Cytogenetic And Genome Research, 117: 313-318.

  117. Ellen, E. D., Muir, W. M., Teuscher, F., and Bijma, P. 2007. Genetic improvement of traits affected by interactions among individuals: Sib selection schemes. Genetics, 176: 489-499.

  118. Li, H. M., Margam, V., Muir, W. M., Murdock, L. L., and Pittendrigh, B. R. 2007a. Changes in Drosophila melanogaster midgut proteins in response to dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor. Insect Molecular Biology, 16: 539-549.

  119. Li, P., Peatman, E., Wang, S. L., Feng, J. N., He, C. B., Baoprasertkul, P., Xu, P., Kucuktas, H., Nandi, S., Somridhivej, B., Serapion, J., Simmons, M., Turan, C., Liu, L., Muir, W., Dunham, R., Brady, Y., Grizzle, J., and Liu, Z. J. 2007b. Towards the ictalurid catfish transcriptome: generation and analysis of 31,215 catfish ESTs. BMC Genomics, 8.

  120. Muir, W. M. 2007. Genomic selection, accuracy and comparisons with traditional BLUP under alternative marker density and generations of training. Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 6: 342-355.

  121. Muir, W.M. and H. Cheng. 2007. A world wide and genome wide assessment of biodiversity in commercial poultry populations. Proceedings of the 56th National Breeders Roundtable

  122. Muir,W.M., G. Wong, Y. Zhang, J. Wang, M.A.M. Groenen, R. Crooijmans, H.J. Megens, H.M. Zhang, J.C. McKay, S. McLeod, R. Okimoto, J.E. Fulton, P. Settar, N. P. O'Sullivan, A. Vereijken, A. Rattink, G.A.A. Albers, C. Taylor-Lawley, ME. Delany, and HH. Cheng. 2007. Chicks and SNPs. Proceedings. European poultry genetics. Pp. 1-5

  123. Ragavendran, A., Muir, W. M., Howard, R. D., and Rosa, G. J. M. 2007. Risk assessment of transgene invasion in natural populations: effect of demographic stochasticity on model predictions. Transgenic Research, 16: 862-863.

  124. Tarver, M. R., Shade, R. E., Shukle, R. H., Moar, W. J., Muir, W. M., Murdock, L. M., and Pittendrigh, B. R. 2007. Pyramiding of insecticidal compounds for control of the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus F.). Pest Management Science, 63: 440-446.

  125. Zhang, H. M., Bacon, L. D., Heidari, M., Muir, W. M., Groenen, M. A. M., Zhang, Y., Wong, G. K. S., Fulton, J. E., O'Sullivan, N. P., Albers, G. A. A., Vereijken, A. L. J., Rattink, A. P., Okimoto, R., McKay, J. C., Mcleod, S., and Cheng, H. H. 2007. Genetic variation at the tumour virus B locus in commercial and laboratory chicken populations assessed by a medium-throughput or a high-throughput assay. Avian Pathology, 36: 283-286.

  126. Muir, W.M., G.K. Wong, Y. Zhang, J. Wang, M.A.M. Groenen, R.M.A. Crooijmans, H.-J. Megens, H.M. Zhang, J.C. Mckay, S. Mcleod, R Okimoto, J.E. Fulton, P. Settar, N.P. O'sullivan, A. Vereijken, A. Jungerius-Rattlnk, G.A.A. Albers, C. Taylor-Lawley, M.E. Delany and H.H. Cheng. 2008. Review of the initial validation and characterization of a 3K chicken SNP array. World's Poultry Science Journal 64: 219-226.

  127. Muir, W.M., G.J.M. Rosa, B.R. Pittendrigh, S. Xu, S.D. Rider, M. Fountain and J. Ogas 2008. A mixture model approach for the analysis of small exploratory microarray experiments. J. Computational Statistics and Data Analysis. In Press http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csda.2008.06.011

  128. Zhang, H, S Rider Jr., J Henderson, M Fountain, K Chuang, V Kandachar, A Simons, H Edenberg, J Romero-Severson, W Muir, and J Ogas. 2008 The CHD3 Remodeler PICKLE Promotes Trimethylation of Histone H3 Lysine 27' Journal of Biological Chemistry. 283:22637-22648

  129. Muir, WM., GKS Wong, Y Zhang, J Wang, MAM Groenen, RPMA Crooijmans, HJ Megens, H Zhang, R Okimoto, A Vereijken, A Jungerius, GAA Albers, C Taylor-Lawley, ME Delany, S MacEachern, and HH Cheng. 2008. Genome-Wide Assessment of World-Wide Chicken SNP Genetic Diversity Indicates Significant Absence of Rare Alleles in Commercial Breeds. Proceeds of the National Academy of Sciences 105:17312-17317

  130. H.-M. Li, L. Sun , O. Mittapalli, W. M. Muir, J. Xie, J. Wu, B. J. Schemerhorn, W. Sun, B. R. Pittendrigh and L. L. Murdock. 2009. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut" Insect Molecular Biology. Insect Molecular Biology 18 (1), 21–31

  131. Groenen, MAM, Per Wahlberg, HH Cheng, Hendrik-Jan M, R Crooijmans, I Gut, M Latrop, Bill Muir, GKS Wong and L Andersson. 2009. A second generation consensus linkage map of the chicken genome. Genome Research (In Press)

  132. Van Eenennaam, A. and W.M. Muir. 2009. Animal Biotechnologies And Agricultural Sustainability. In The Role of Biotechnology in a Sustainable Food Supply. Eds (in press)

  133. Huseyin Kucuktas, Shaolin Wang, Ping Li, Chongbo He, Peng Xu, Zhenxia Sha, Hong Liu, Yanliang Jiang, Puttharat Baoprasertkul, Benjaporn Somridhivej, Yaping Wang, Jason Abernathy, Ximing Guo, Lei Liu, William Muir, Zhanjiang Liu. 2009. Construction of Genetic Linkage Maps and Comparative Genome Analysis of Catfish Using Gene-associated Markers. Genetics (In press)

Submitted

  1. W.M. Muir, G.J.M. Rosa, B.R. Pittendrigh, S. Xu, S.D. Rider, M. Fountain and J. Ogas. 2008. A Quantitative Genetics Approach to Discovery of Biologically Significant Genes in Microarray Analysis. Genetics.

  2. Kelly M Paulson Anne Kapuscinski W.M. Muir 2007 Variable persistence of fish transgenes challenges risk assessment. Science

  3. Heng Zhang, Stanley Rider Jr., James Henderson, Matthew Fountain, King Chuang, Vasundhara Kandachar, Alexis Simons, Howard Edenberg, Jeanne Romero-Severson, William Muir, and Joe Ogas. 2008 The CHD3 Remodeler PICKLE Promotes Trimethylation of Histone H3 Lysine 27' PLOS Genetics

  4. Ragavendran, A, G.J.M. Rosa, R.D. Howard and W.M. Muir 2008. Effect of Demographic Stochasticity in Evaluating the Risk Associated with Transgene Invasion in an Age-Structured Population of Genetically Modified Fish

  5. Nordgreen, J., J. Garner, A. M. Janczak, B. Ranheim, H. Kolsrud Hustoft, W.M. Muir, T.E. Horsberg. 2008. Development of a method to study thermonociception in fish: The effects of two different doses of morphine on thermal threshold and post-test behaviour in goldfish

  6. Sun, L, B Schemerhorn, Ar Jannasch, J Adamec, W Muir, and B R. Pittendrigh 2008. Differential response of DDT-susceptible and -resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains to DDT and oxidative stress

  7. Armstrong, JK, A.L. Grant, P.V. Malven, W. Muir and D.E. Gerrard. 2008. Muscle-Derived Igf-I Increases Postnatal Growth.

Books Edited

  1. Muir, WM and Aggrey, S. 2003. Poultry Genetics, Breeding and Biotechnology. CABI Press Cambridge, MA. 706 pp.

Patents

  1. Provisional Patent P-00014.P3.US Incorporation of Competitive Effects in Breeding Programs with Group-Group Selection, March 23, 2001.

  2. Provisional Patent P-00014.P2.US Incorporation of Competitive Effects in Breeding Programs with Individual-Group Selection, March 23, 2001.

  3. Provisional Patent P-00014.P1.US Incorporation of Competitive Effects in Breeding Programs with Full BLUP Selection, March 23, 2001.

Invited Presentations

  1. Animal Sciences Youth Workshop. Improving performance of poultry through genetics. May 11, 1985, W. Lafayette, IN.

  2. University of Illinois. Utilization of control populations for maximum information and power of tests. June 19, 1985, Urbana, IL.

  3. Poultry Health and Management Conference. Genetic challenges in the commercial egg industry April 10, 1985, W. Lafayette, IN.

  4. Michigan Animal Breeders. Improving performance of poultry through genetics. October 26, 1985, Lafayette, IN.

  5. Third World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production. Plenary Session on Design of Breeding Programs. Efficient design and analysis of selection experiments. July 18, 1986, Lincoln, NE.

  6. Purdue University, Dept. Biological Sciences. Estimation of fitness parameters relative to group vs. individual selection. May 6, 1987, W. Lafayette, IN.

  7. Purdue University, Statistics Department. Basic quantitative genetic theory. January 19, 1988, W. Lafayette, IN.

  8. Indian Rivers International. Estimation of response to selection in non-replicated populations. November 19. 1991, Nacogdoches, TX.

  9. Indian Rivers International. Multistage selection to optimize a linear profit function. November 20, 1991, Nacogdoches, TX.

  10. Indiana Business Modernization and Technology Corporation. Macro genetic engineering to uncover genes in animal populations for stress resistance and domestication. March 31, 1992, Lafayette, IN.

  11. XIX World's Poultry Congress. Optimizing profits in Breeding programs using selection index updating. September 23, 1992, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  12. National Breeders Roundtable. Estimation of response to selection and standard errors in non-replicated populations. May 18, 1992, St. Louis, MO.

  13. American Society of Animal Sciences. Selection index updating with applications to beef cattle breeding. March 30, 1993, Des Moines, IA.

  14. American Poultry Science Association. Improving adaptability, stress resistance, and welfare of poultry layers by group selection. July 13, 1993, Ann Arbor, MI.

  15. First International Conference on Risk Assessment Methodologies. Use of multigenerational studies to assess genetic stability, fitness, and competitive ability of transgenic Japanese medaka: I. Methodology. June 23, 1994, College Park, MA.

  16. TAB (Technical Advisor Board), Newsham Hybrids. Use of introgression and marker assisted selection in swine breeding programs. October 1, 1994, Colorado Springs, CO.

  17. Purdue University, ANSC Departmental Seminar. Integration of present and new genetic approaches for animal improvement. September 27, 1994, W. Lafayette, IN.

  18. Purdue University, Department of Agricultural Economics. Use of genetics to increase profitability in breeding programs. November 17, 1994, W. Lafayette, IN.

  19. The 5th Worlds Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production, Poultry Improvement: Integration of present and new genetic approaches for layers. September, 1994, Ontario, Canada.

  20. First North American Symposium on Poultry Welfare. Improving animal well- being through genetic selection. August 12-15 1995, Alberta, Canada.

  21. University de Federal. Use of molecular genetic techniques in animal breeding programs. July 14-31, 1995. Vicosa, Brazil.

  22. TAB Conference. Integration of present and new genetic approaches for animal improvement. November 11-15, 1995, Colorado Springs, CO.

  23. Second International Conference on Risk Assessment Methodologies. Use of multigenerational studies to assess genetic stability, fitness, and competitive ability of transgenic Japanese medaka: II. Development of Transgenic Medaka and Mating preferences. June 5-8, 1995, Pensacola, FL.

  24. Third International Conference on Risk Assessment Methodologies. Use of multigenerational studies to assess genetic stability, fitness, and competitive ability of transgenic Japanese medaka: III. Results and predictions. June 5-8, 1996, Ottawa, Canada.

  25. American Fisheries Society Symposium: “Assessing and managing risk posed by genetically modified aquatic organisms (GMO’s). August 17, 1996, Detroit, MI.

  26. Poultry Science Assoc. Symposium: "Genetic Selection- Strategies for the Future". July 8, 1996, Louisville, KY.

  27. TAB (Technical Advisor Board) Conference, Newsham Hybrids. Selection for major genes, is it worth it? Nov. 15, 1996. Breckenridge, CO.

  28. Chore Time -Brock Int. Poultry genetics and Breeding. Jan 17, 1996, Goshen IN.

  29. Poultry Research Conference. Group selection for adaptation to multiple-hen cages. School Vet. Med. October 8, 1996, W. Lafayette, IN.

  30. National Swine Testing and Genetic Improvement Conference. Candidate gene selection, potential and limitations. April 4, 1997, Lafayette, IN.

  31. National Swine Improvement Federation. Selection for major genes. December 5-6, 1997, Des Moines, IA.

  32. TAB Conference. Economics of selection for major genes. Nov. 18-19, 1997. Vail, CO.

  33. National Swine Improvement Federation. Selection for Major Genes. December 5-6, 1997, Des Moines, IA.

  34. Symposium: Topics Critical to Animal Sciences: Candidate gene selection. July 27 1997, Juiz de Fora, MG. Brazil.

  35. Symposium: Topics Critical to Animal Sciences Joint with R. W. Fairfull. Quantitative Genetics versus Molecular Genetics in Poultry Breeding. July 27 1997, Juiz de Fora, MG. Brazil.

  36. Department of Animal Sciences, Departmental Seminar: Effect of including genes with major effects in breeding programs, August 19, 1997, Guelph, Canada.

  37. 6th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding. Relative advantage of combining genes with major effects in breeding programs: simulation results. January 8, 1998, Armadale, Australia.

  38. Plant and Animal Genome Conference VI, in conjunction with NRSP-8. Selection for major genes, advantages and disadvantages. January 18, 1998, San Diego, CA.

  39. Gordon Research Conference: Molecular and Quantitative Genetics. Optimizing Candidate Gene Selection, Finite Locus Models. February 14, 1998, Ventura, CA.

  40. Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University. Sexual selection and the Trojan gene hypothesis. September 8, 1998, Lafayette, IN.

  41. Distinguished Speaker Academic Excellence Program, Springfield College in Illinois. Impact of Animal Biotechnology on Animal Well-being, Agriculture, and the Environment. October 10, 1998. Springfield IL.

  42. A Search for Candidate Genes for Behavior with Implications to Pharmaceuticals. Eli Lilly Co., October 25, 1999. Greenfield, IN.

  43. International Symposium on Animal Breeding and Genetics. Federal University of Vicosa, Molecular Genetics in Poultry Breeding. September 22, 1999, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

  44. The Trojan Gene Hypothesis. Department of Animal Science. December 10, 1999, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

  45. Transgenic Animals in Agriculture. Effect of genetic background on transgene expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes) and models to assess environmental risk of GMO's. August 15-19, 1999, Tahoe City, CA.

  46. Symposium: Genetics x Environment Interactions and Animal Growth. American Society of Animal Sciences. Impact of Competitive Effects on Growth. July, 1999, Indianapolis, IN.

  47. Plant and Animal Genome Conference VIII. Integration of molecular technologies with classical quantitative methods for improvement of poultry production traits. January 13, 2000, San Diego, CA.

  48. Breeding And Genetics Symposium: Managing Inbreeding in Livestock Populations. Midwest ADSA/ASAS meetings. The interaction of selection intensity, inbreeding depression, and random genetic drift on short and long term response to selection: results from biological and finite locus simulations models. March 14, 2000, Des Moines, IA.

  49. Celera AgGen and College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Symposium: Agricultural and Environmental Genomics. Effect of genetic background on transgene expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes) and models to assess environmental risk of GMO's. April 14, 2000, Davis, CA.

  50. Symposium: Potential Ecosystem Effects of Genetically-Modified Organisms. Methods to assess environmental risk of transgenic fish: results obtained with Medaka. February 28-29, 2000, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

  51. Symposium: Effects of Cultured, Released, Genetically Altered Organisms on the Environment. International Marine Biotechnology Conference. Development Of Models To Access Environmental Risk From Genetically Modified Organisms GMO's. September 29, 2000, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

  52. Development Of Models To Access Environmental Risk From Genetically Modified Organisms GMO's. October 19, 2000, Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN.

  53. Biotechnology: Any Limits or Risks? Lafayette Kiwanis. November 16, 2000, W. Lafayette, IN.

  54. Wisconsin State Egg Board and Midwest Poultry Consortium. Beak Trimming, Problems and Solutions. July 17, 2000, Madison WI.

  55. Genomics Media Conference, Animal Genomics Research. January 11, 2001, W. Lafayette, IN.

  56. Farm Bureau, Biotechnology Risk Assessment. March 21, 2001, W. Lafayette, IN.

  57. Pig Improvement Company (PIC) Direct incorporation of competitive effects in the mixed model equations to improve productivity and animal well-being. August 10, 2001, Franklin KY.

  58. Symposium: Sustainable Development, Agriculture, And The Challenge Of Genetically Modified Organisms. The role of GMO's in modern agriculture. March 30-31, 2001, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

  59. National Swine Improvement Federation "Addressing issues of competition and animal well-being in swine breeding programs." December 7, 2001, St. Louis, MO.

  60. International ICGR Symposium: Animal Welfare Considerations In Livestock Housing Systems. October 22-24, 2001, Zielona Góra, Poland.

  61. Gordon Research Conference: The Analysis of Complex Traits in Animals, Discussion Leader, February 22, 2001, Ventura, CA.

  62. Symposium: Agriculture, Sustainability and Globalization. The role of GMOs in modern agriculture. Indiana University School of Law. March 29, 2001, Bloomington, IN.

  63. Comparison of Genetic Gain Utilizing Information From The Phenotype vs. BLUP vs. Molecular Information. Hubbard-ISA. April 1-2, 2001, Boston, MA.

  64. National Association of State Departments of Agriculture: Assessing Ecological Risk with Biotechnology. July 21-25, 2001, Indianapolis, IN.

  65. Monsanto Corporation. Incorporating competitive effects in mixed model equations. September 27, 2001, St. Louis, MO.

  66. Transgenic Research Conference: Chair and Discussion leader. Transgenics in Aquaculture. November 12, 2001, Tahoe, CA.

  67. National Swine Improvement Federation: Addressing issues of competition and animal well-being in swine breeding. December 7, 2001, St. Louis, MO.

  68. Risk assessment and invasive species. Can the potential for invasion be measured, monitored and managed? Invasive Species Working Group. March 27, 2002, W. Lafayette, IN.

  69. Plant, Animal & Microbe Genomes Conference Statistical Methods Workshop: Optimizing Selection For Candidate Genes In Programs Incorporating Pedigree Information (BLUP). January 14-15 2002, San Diego, CA.

  70. Dow AgroSciences, Biotechnology Risk Assessment Methodology. March 11, 2002, Indianapolis, IN.

  71. National Breeders Roundtable. Incorporation of competitive interactions in breeding programs to improve poultry performance and well-being. May 3, 2002, St. Louis, MO.

  72. Symposium: Long-term Selection. Long term selection in Tribolium, alternative strategies, and associated nature of quantitative genetic variation. May 3, 2002, Champaign, IL.

  73. Multilevel Selection Symposium: Animal Behavior Society Incorporation Of Multi-Level Selection In Artificial Breeding Programs To Improve Group Performance and Well-Being of Farm Animals. July 17, 2002, Bloomington, IN.

  74. Symposium: Biotech in the Barnyard. Methods of Biotechnology Risk Assessment. PEW National Charitable Trust. September 24-25, 2002, Dallas, TX.

  75. Crane Conference Behaviour and Genes Improving Adaptability and Animal Well-Being Through Genetics. April 10-14, 2002, Skara, Sweden.

  76. Vertical Gene Transmission and Generalized Methods of GM Risk Assessment. April 9, 2002, Göteborg, Sweden.

  77. Long-term Selection Symposium, Long term selection in Tribolium, alternative strategies, and associated nature of quantitative genetic variation. June 17-19, 2002, Urbana, IL.

  78. Workshop: Information Systems for Biotechnology. Critical Examination of Muir's Net Fitness Methods of Biotechnology Risk Assessment. June 27-30, 2002, Richman, VA.

  79. Multilevel Selection Symposium. Animal Behavior Society. Incorporation Of Multi-Level Selection In Artificial Breeding Programs To Improve Group Performance and Well-being of Farm Animals. July 13-17, 2002, Bloomington, IN.

  80. 7th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding. Use of molecular genetics in poultry breeding. August 25, 2002, Montpelier, France.

  81. 7th World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Breeding. Incorporation of competitive effects in breeding programs to improve productivity and animal well being. August 26, 2002, Montpelier France.

  82. PEW Charitable Trusts. Biotechnology in the Barnyard. Ecological risk issues associated with transgenic animals. September 24-25, 2002, Dallas, TX.

  83. Plant and Animal Genome Conference. Statistical Genetics Workshop. Statistical Genomic Methods to Reduce Competitive Effects in Animal and Forest Tree Breeding Programs. January 14, 2003, San Diego, CA.

  84. Gordon Research Conference on Quantitative Genetics and Genomics. Generalized Methods of Environmental Risk Assessment For Transgenic Organisms. February 13, 2003, Ventura, CA.

  85. American Association For the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Symposium: Impacts of Biotechnology on Biodiversity and Environment. Transgenic Fish and Aquatic Biodiversity: Modeling Risks. February 15 2003, Denver, CO.

  86. Bioinformatics Seminar Series. Methods To Select For or Map Qtls For Competitive Effects In Plants Or Animals. Department of Statistics, Purdue University. February 25, 2003, W. Lafayette, IN.

  87. Canadian Center for Swine Improvement. "Genetic methods to addressing issues of competition and animal wellbeing in swine breeding programs." April 23, 2003, Ottawa, Canada.

  88. Canadian Center for Swine Improvement. "Applications and limitations of incorporating molecular information in breeding programs." April 24, 2003, Ottawa, Canada.

  89. Symposium: Aquatic Resources in Arid Lands. "Characterization of Environmental Risk of Genetically Modified (GM) or Exotic Species, and Potential for Engineering GM Organisms to Control Exotic Invasive Species." April 29, 2003, Los Cruses, NM.

  90. National Breeders Roundtable. Optimal Methods for Incorporating Candidate Genes Into Selection Programs for Short and Long Term Improvement in Sex Limited and Non Sex Limited Traits. May 8, 2003, St. Louis, MO.

  91. USDA Biotechnology Risk Assessment Program: Future Directions. Invited Panelist Fish, Shellfish, and Insects. June 9-10, 2003, Washington, DC.

  92. Symposium; Genetics for Swine Production: What's in it for the producer? "Genetic selection for a Kinder Gentler Pig (KGP)." June 17, 2003, Stratford, Canada.

  93. The Seventh Purdue International Symposium on Statistics. Statistical Genomic Methods to Map QTLs Associated with Competitive Effects in Plants or Animals. June 19, 2003, W. Lafayette, IN.

  94. 27th Poultry Science Symposium on The Welfare of Laying Hens. Breeding for Productivity and Welfare. July 17-20, 2003, Bristol, England.

  95. Society of Environmental Journalists. Invited GMO Panelist. September 13, 2003, New Orleans, LA.

  96. Transgenic Animal Research Conference IV. Ecological risks and benefits of fish transgenic for the phytase gene. Joint with H. Hostetler. August 10-14 2003, Lake Tahoe, CA.

  97. Information Systems for Biotechnology: Environmental Risk Assessment Modeling Workshop II. Overview and Limitations of the Net fitness Methodology. October 9-10, 2003, Colorado Springs, CO.

  98. Ag Biotech Food Forum. Defining the role of marine biotechnology in the food industry. December 8-9, 2003, Chicago, IL.

  99. Plant and Animal Genome. Poultry Workshop. Genome Wide Marker Assisted Selection. January 10-14, 2004, San Diego, CA.

  100. Application of Modeling to Risk Assessment of GM Fish: The Net Fitness Approach. Experts Meeting on Assessment of Environmental and Indirect Human Health Effects of Genetically Modified Aquatic Organisms, March 30-31, 2004, Vancouver, British Columbia.

  101. Canadian Center for Swine Improvement. Swine Molecular Genetics Group Meeting Evolution of Benefits from Use of Molecular Information March 4, 2004, Ottawa, Canada.

  102. British Society of Animal Science Symposium: Breeding and Welfare: threats and opportunities. "The Use of Group Selection in Poultry and Pigs to Improve Welfare." April 6, 2004, York, England.

  103. Regulatory Frameworks: Potential Invasiveness of Genetically Engineered Crops in the USA and International Centers of Biodiversity, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program, University of California – Davis, April 23rd, 2004, Davis, CA.

  104. Genome Wide Marker Assisted Selection: Reductionism Finally Meets Holism. Seminar Department of Animal Sciences, University of California, , April 26, 2004, Davis CA.

  105. Genetics of Animal Well-being Aviagen, May 13-14, 2004, Huntsville Alabama

  106. Potential for Engineering GM Organisms to Control Exotic Invasive Species, Bureau of Reclamation, June 30, 2004, Phoenix Arizona.

  107. Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology: Animals Steering Committee. July 12-13 2004 Washington DC. .

  108. McKinley/Monsanto. Symposium: Creating Value from Genomics in the Pork Industry. Predicted impact/genetic response of MAS. July 29 2004. St. Louis MO.

  109. Yorktown Biotechnology. Risk Assessment Methods: Application to Glowfish. August 6-7, 2004. Sanibel Island, Florida.

  110. 8th International Biosafety Symposium: Generalized Methods of GM risk assessment Sept. 26-30 2004. Montpellier, France

  111. Eurotier Fair International Poultry Breeding Symposium, How Can Genomic Information be Used in Breeding Programs, November 10, 2004. Hanover Germany

  112. Plant and Animal Genome. Poultry Workshop. The Number of Generations of Training Needed for Genome Wide Marker Assisted Selection:. January 14, 2005, San Diego, CA.

  113. Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology: Workshop on Exploring the Moral and Ethical Aspects of Genetically Engineered and Cloned Animals. January 24-26 2005 Washington DC.

  114. Fast Pigs Genetics Advisory Board, February 24-27, 2005. Saskatoon, SK, Canada

  115. Yorktown Biotechnology. Risk Assessment Methods: Application to Glowfish. July 13-17, 2005. Marina Delray, California

  116. Transgenic Animal Research Conference IV. Section Chair Transgenic Fish. August 14-18, 2005, Lake Tahoe, CA

  117. Review Panel Robust Chicken Project. Nov 28-30 2005, Wageningen University, The Netherlands.

  118. Group Selection: Application in commercial breeding to enhance productivity, robustness, and well-being in poultry layers. Hendrix Poultry Breeding. Dec 1, 2005. Boxmeer, Holland.

  119. Genomic Selection with applications to broiler breeding. Nutreco. Dec 2, 2005. Boxmeer, Holland.

  120. Plant and Animal Genome Conference. Poultry Workshop. Detection of selective sweeps using genetic markers. San Diego CA. Jan 14, 2006.

  121. International Meat Animal Welfare Research Conference (IMAWRC), "Genetics: Breeding for Desirable behaviors" February 22, 2006 Kansas City, MO.

  122. Detection of domestication selection using dense SNP data. COBB. Fayetteville AR. April 15-18, 2006.

  123. European Coordinated Action "Genimpact". Genetics of domestication and breeding of fish and shellfish", Rome, Italy, June 15th-17th 2006.

  124. Sustainable Animal Breeding (SABRE) workshop sponsored by the UK BBSRC Section Numerical genomics and approaches to incorporate genotyping information in the analysis of phenotypes: "Group selection and behaviour genomics". Edinburgh Scotland UK, June 12-13 2006.

  125. 8th World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production. Incorporation of competitive effects in breeding programs for improved performance and animal well-being. Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. August 13-18, 2006.

  126. EPA Star Workshop. Microarrays for detection of allergens in foods. Washington DC. November 13-14, 2006

  127. Plant and Animal Genome Conference. Title: Innate Genetic Differences In Birds Differing In Aggressive Behavior As Determined By Affymetrix Genechip Chicken Genome Array. San Diego CA. January 13, 2007

  128. Symposium: Biotech Aquaculture: Environmental Sustainability and Commercial Profitability. Title: Addressing and managing risk through net fitness assessment, case studies, and general thoughts about sustainability. San Antonio Texas. February 28, 2007.

  129. Behaviour and Welfare seminar series: Title: Multilevel Selection in Breeding Programs, a Win-Win-Win Solution for the Animal, Producers, and Society Guelph Canada. March 28, 2007.

  130. FDA, Center for Veterinary Medicine Staff College, Title: Trojan Gene Theory. Rockville Maryland. April 26, 2007.

  131. National Breeders Roundtable, Title: Will the Flattening Landscape of Commercial Poultry Lines be a Desolate Desert or A Fertile Plain. St. Louis MO. May 3, 2007.

  132. Genesis Faraday Workshop: 'Use of DNA tests in Livestock Breeding' Title: Genome Wide Marker Assisted Selection (GMAS) a Breakthrough in Application of Genomics to Animal Breeding. Coventry England. May 14, 2007.

  133. Roslin Institute. Industry-wide and genome-wide assessment of commercial poultry biodiversity. Edinburgh Scotland, UK. May 16, 2007.

  134. Assessing Risk of GM fish. Yorktown Technologies. Hilton Head SC. July 14, 2007

  135. European Association of Animal Production. Symposium Statistical Analysis of Genomic Data. Genomic Selection: A break through for application of marker assisted selection to traits of low heritability, promise and concerns. Dublin Ireland, UK. August 27, 2007.

  136. Neutreco/Hendrix Poultry. Genomic Selection Benefits and Pitfalls. Boxmere Netherlands August 31, 2007.

  137. COBB-Vantres Poultry Breeding Inc. Genomic Selection, Implementation in Industry. October 9, 2007.

  138. Symposium: Domestication and Evolution of the Pig. Lessons from the Chicken. University of Illinois Urbana Illinois. March 4, 2008.

  139. Symposium at the Canadian Society of Animal (CSAS) Science Annual Meeting. Integrating Animal Behaviour with other Animal Science Disciplines. University of Guelph Canada. August 14 2008

  140. Science-based approach to Animal Wellbeing. College of Agriculture. University of Arkansas. October 8, 2008.

  141. Bioinformatics Seminar, Department of Statistics, Purdue University. "Missing Alleles as a Metric of Biodiversity: An Example Using Commercial Poultry Populations , November 11, 2008