Polaroid picture of spotted lanternfly nymphs on a branch. The lanternfly are bright pinkish red with white and black spots and black legs.
Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly feeds on over 70 species, including black walnuts, roses, tree of heaven, red maples, and river birches, and is particularly damaging to vineyards and fruit orchards. If you see it, report it.

A sloping hill with a fence at the bottom and a parked silver car. There appear to be trees on the slope. The entire slope, trees, and fence are covered with bright green vines.
Kudzu

Kudzu grows quickly and smothers small plants and trees. Kudzu can often be seen covering buildings, signs, and telephone poles. Prevent its spread by removing it if you find it and avoid transporting seeds. If you see it, report it.

A redish brown injury on the bark of a brown tree with a small amount of green moss on it.
Sudden Oak Death

Sudden oak death is a plant pathogen that harms oaks and other woody plants by causing bark cankers, leaf spots, twig dieback, and eventual death. It spreads through infected plants, soil, and water so preventing its spread through timely diagnosis, disposal of contaminated material, and quarantines is paramount. If you see it, report it.

Close view of a cluster of white flowers with pink centers.
Callery/Bradford Pear

Bradford (callery pear) is an environmentally devastating tree that crowds out Indiana’s native plants by taking over forests and parks. Its white flowers have an unpleasant odor, some escaped trees are aggressively thorny, and the branches easily split and fall. Consider planting native alternatives to help prevent its spread.

Several bushes in a field near the edge of a wooded area. The bushes are mostly brown and still have dead leaves on them. There are small patches of green leaves.
Boxwood Blight

Boxwood Blight is a plant pathogen that harms boxwoods by causing dark leaf spots, cankers on stems, and white sporulation on leaves and stems, eventually killing some plants. Using blight-resistant boxwoods, avoiding boxwood decorations, not cutting wet plants, and not composting infected plants can prevent the pathogen’s spread. If you see it, report it.

Mile a minute vine in a forested area. The vines cover everything that is not on the forest floor. The vines have dense arrow shaped leaves.
Mile-A-Minute Vine

Mile-a-minute vine is a fast-growing vine with nearly perfectly triangular leaves that smothers and shades out native species. Prevent its spread by removing it as soon as it is found, and by properly destroying plant material. If you see it, report it.

The image shows a field of identical plants. The plants have green arrow shaped leaves with sharp points along the edges. The plants have small clusters of white flowers. There are branches with no leaves above the plants.
Garlic Mustard

Garlic Mustard can take over the understory of forests, interfering with the growth of native plants and acting as a reservoir for damaging plant viruses. Prevent its spread by removing and properly disposing of plant material.

A polaroid style photo of an Asian longhorned beetle. The beetle rests in a human hand. It has a penny next to it. The beetle is about the size of two pennies. The beetle is black with white spots and has antenna longer than its body.
Asian Longhorned Beetle

Asian Longhorned Beetle is an invasive beetle that attacks many hardwood tree species, especially maples, horse chestnut, birches, willows, and elms. Once a tree is infested with the beetle, it cannot be saved. Prevent its spread by not moving firewood and inspecting susceptible trees for the beetle, frass, or circular exit holes. If you see it, report it.

A close up of plants with small, rounded bright green leaves. The plant has white flowers clustered throughout. The flowers have long thin tubes made of the petals at the base. The petals have two clumps at the top and one long petal at the bottom.
Invasive Honeysuckles

Invasive Honeysuckles include several species of vines and shrubs from the genus Lonicera that grow quickly, covering large areas, shading out native plants, and girdling or weighing down trees. Prevent its spread by removing it from property and checking clothing for seeds.

The surface of the water. Just below the surface of the water is filled with long green plants about the thickness of a cat tail.
Brazilian Elodea

Brazilian elodea forms dense mats in bodies of water, clogging pipes, crowding out native species, and impeding recreational activities. Prevent its spread by cleaning equipment before moving to a new body of water and disposing of aquarium and water garden plants properly. If you see it, report it.

A Japanese beetle resting on a green leaf. The beetle is copper colored with black legs, white tufts on the edge of its body, with a green metallic head.
Japanese Beetle

Japanese Beetle is an invasive beetle accidentally brought to the US in the soil of ornamental plants. The grubs damage pastures and lawns by feeding on the roots of grasses. The adults overwhelm plants and skeletonize leaves. They eat over 300 species of plants, including crops, flowers, ornamentals, and fruits.

A row of planted burning bushes next to a road. The bushes have bright red leaves.
Burning Bush

Burning Bush is an invasive shrub that is tolerant of full shade, and can grow in dense thickets, displacing native plants. Prevent its spread by removing it from property and replacing it with native species.

A Polaroid style image of a jumping Asian carp. The fish is silver.
Asian Carp

Asian Carp species overpopulate bodies of water and can jump out of the water when disturbed, harming people and equipment. They can harm other fish populations and pollute bodies of water, so if you catch one, do not throw it back. If you see it, report it.

Gypsy Moth

Gypsy moth primarily feeds on oak trees, and if the outbreak is large enough, they can defoliate and possibly kill trees. Prevent their spread by checking for egg masses before moving outdoor furniture and vehicles, and by not transporting firewood. If you see it, report it.

Close up of several maple leaves. The leaves closest to the front of the image are attaches to a thin brown stem. The leaves have red stems and veins. The tissue of the leaves is yellow with brown and green spots. The tissue has holes in it.
Norway Maple

Norway Maple grows a canopy thicker than other trees, which allows them to spread and out-compete many native trees, including the sugar maple. Prevent its spread by pulling seedings on property and planting native alternatives where possible.

The image shows a vine twined together. The vines have long arrow shaped leaves growing out of it. The vine has clusters of flowers. The flowers have thick purple petals that look textured. They have a green center.
Black and Pale Swallow-wort

Black and pale swallow-wort are vines that damage the environment by covering large areas and out-competing plants used by animals for food and shelter. Prevent its spread by removing it from property and destroying its seedpods. If you see it, destroy it.

A mute swam swimming on a lake. The swan is white. Its beak is bright orange and is outlined in black. A patch of the black outline connects to the bird's black eyes.
Mute Swan

The Mute Swan is an invasive bird brought from Europe to populate urban parks. They are highly aggressive and known to chase humans, native birds, and other swans. They out-compete native birds for food and cause significant damage to aquatic plants during feeding. Prevent their spread by supporting the use of native swans in parks and ponds instead of mute swans.

A close image of a tree of heaven plant. It shows the leaves and seeds. The leaves are long, slim, and come to a point. The leaflets are attached opposite each other to the main stem. The seeds are also long and thing but are curled and twisted at the edges. They are pink and green.
Tree of Heaven

Tree of Heaven is an invasive tree that can crowd out native trees and damage roads and sidewalks. It has an unpleasant smell and its sap can cause heart issues in some people. Prevent its spread by carefully removing from property.

The edge of a forested area. There is a man with a red spraying device that he is using to spray some of the edge plants. One of the plants is taller than the man. It has large leaves and flowers larger than his head. The flowers are made of smaller individual flower clusters much like queen Ann's lace.
Giant Hogweed

Contact with Giant Hogweed causes severe burns on the skin. It crowds out native plants on roadsides and woodland edges, contributing to erosion. Prevent its spread by cleaning clothing after traveling through areas with giant hogweed and destroying seeds when found. If you see it, report it.

Two leaves are in the center of the image. The leaves are light bright green. They have a similar shape as maple leaves. In the background are more of the same leaves as well as a few other plants.
Japanese Hops

Japanese Hops harms the environment by growing in thick blankets that cover and out-compete other plants. Hairs on the stem can irritate the skin and the pollen can cause allergic reactions. Prevent its spread by removing seeds from clothing after encountering it.

A close up of a thistle plant. The thistle has sharp spikes of green leaves. The flower is a light purple tuft.
Invasive Thistles

Invasive Thistles spread across large areas, outcompeting native plants, decreasing crop yields, and reducing forage for livestock. Prevent its spread using consistent thistle management in fields and checking clothes for seeds after encountering it.

There is a larger image and three smaller images in the top left hand corner. The larger image shows a dense patch of small green plants. One of the plants has thorns and red berries. The first of the smaller images shows brnaching green stems with red berries on top from the side. The second image shows the same type of branching green stem with red berries that have small black circles on top. The final image shows leaves of the plant. The leaves are ovals with points on either end. They are attached opposite to each other on the plant with one single leaf at the end.
Multiflora Rose

Multiflora Rose grows in dense bushes that can crowd out native plants on forest edges. Prevent its spread by removing it from property and replacing with native alternatives.

Bittersweet in winter. the bittersweet branches do not have leaves but still retain their bright red berries with yellow coverings.
Oriental Bittersweet

Oriental bittersweet is spread by animals eating the berries and by people using it for holiday decorations. It causes damage by covering and choking bushes, trees, and fences. Prevent its spread by removing it from property, not using it in decorations, and planting native alternatives.

A dense mat near the surface of the water of a long thing plant with small leaves attached to a thin stem.
Hydrilla

Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant that grows in large mats, shading out native plants, slowing hydroelectric power production, and impeding boating and water recreation activities. When it dies, decomposition of hydrilla depletes oxygen in the water, killing plants and animals. Prevent its spread by cleaning and drying equipment before moving to a new body of water. If you see it, report it.

A red poll holding up a large amount of messy curly water plants. There is a pond behind the plants. The pond is also full of the curly green plant.
Curly-Leaf Pondweed

Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant that grows in large mats, shading out native plants, slowing hydroelectric power production, and impeding boating and water recreation activities. When it dies, decomposition of hydrilla depletes oxygen in the water, killing plants and animals. Prevent its spread by cleaning and drying equipment before moving to a new body of water.

Eurasian water milfoil in a pond. The water in the pond is bright blue. The water milfoil is green and forms dense mats that float near the surface of the pond. The mats fill most of the water shown in the image.
Eurasian Watermilfoil

Eurasian Watermilfoil is an invasive aquatic plant harms the environment by out-competing native plant species, taking their place but not providing food or shelter for native animals. The dense mats it forms on the surface of water impede water recreation activities and transportation. Prevent its spread by cleaning and draining equipment before moving to a new body of water.

Brown marmorated stink bug feeding on a red pepper plant.
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect from East Asia that feeds on fruits, crops, and ornamental plants, but it is most known for invading buildings and homes in the fall. Prevent its spread by checking vehicles and cargo for the insect before road trips.

A Polaroid style photo of an emerald ash borer. The emerald ash borer stands on brown bark. The ash borer is bright green and metallic.
Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer is an invasive insect that kills trees by cutting off water and nutrient transport. Since it is primarily spread by humans, prevent its spread by not moving firewood.

A Polaroid style photo of a feral hog. The hog is standing in a field. The hog is brown with coarse hair.
Feral Hogs

Feral Hogs are a mix of domestic pigs and wild boars that damage the environment through excessive rooting, harming crops, parks, and wildlife habitats. Feral hogs are reservoirs for parasites and diseases that affect domestic animals and are notoriously aggressive, with males sporting large tusks. If you see it, report it.

Bright green corn leaf with scattered patches of yellowing. There are dark brown-red spots along the central vein.
Tar Spot

Tar spot is a pathogen from Central and South America that produces small raised black spots on corn leaves, resulting in crop yield losses. Monitoring fields to help track and study the disease will be integral to further understanding it.

Narrow tunnels and small holes in a cross section of wood.
Thousand Cankers Disease

Thousand Cankers Disease is a disease caused by an interaction between the Walnut Twig Beetle and a fungus, Geosmithia morbida. The disease primarily affects walnut trees by yellowing foliage, thinning the upper crown, and forming cankers under bark, on branches, and on stems. Prevent its spread by not moving firewood and inspecting trees for signs of infection. If you see it, report it.