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Student Profile: Logan Overman

Spreading Agricultural Knowledge Globally Motivates Sophomore

By Jacob Kessens

“I want to be able to advocate for teachers and the agricultural field all at the same time,” explained Logan Overman, a sophomore in agricultural education major from Greenfield, Indiana.

Overman said he wants to be part of the next generation of agriculture and education and make a lasting impact. He said more schools around the country should offer agricultural education courses and wants to be a moving force behind making that happen.

photo of Logan Overman Logan Overman says he wants to make a difference in the world and his studies in agricultural education are preparing him to do so. Photo by Amber Cripps

“Agriculture is not just American; agriculture is global,” he said. “Agriculture is how we are going to feed people globally. We need to teach people how to grow their own crops sustainably and efficiently.”

That global concern means Overman wants to be part of the changes happening in agriculture and education in the United States, and he wants to make a difference in other areas of the world. After Overman graduates from Purdue, he said he plans on taking part in a 10-month fellowship in Ghana. During this time, he will be teaching agricultural education in the west African country.

“The experience of being able to teach agriculture in another country will help me become a more well-rounded educator,” Overman explained. “This will give me the ability to not only understand American agriculture, but it also gives me the chance to learn about agriculture around the world and how it impacts different communities.”

He credits Purdue for helping him prepare to be an educator and to have a voice in the change he would like to see.

“The ASEC department, and the College of Agriculture in general, do a really great job of preparing students professionally,” Overman explained. “They really give you the skills and opportunities to make you a well-rounded individual and educator.”

Agriculture is a basic, but integral, part of our lives, Overman said. He said he wants to make sure that he can be a part of the future generation of educators who will teach the importance of agriculture so that people across the world can live better lives.

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