RRHardwood

Facilitating the Regeneration and Restoration of Native Hardwood Forest Trees

Facilitation the Regeneration and Restoration of Native Hardwood Forest Trees, McIntire-Stennis Research Project, forest scene.Native hardwood forests in the United States provide important commercial and ecological benefits, but the availability and/or quality is dwindling. One method of restoring or rehabilitating these hardwood forests is through the establishment of hardwood plantations.

This project aims to address current technological and environmental limitations to developing these plantations as well as offering new technologies and recommendations to overcome those challenges, improving hardwood reforestation success and alleviating stress on the current native hardwood population.

The goal of this project is to enhance the knowledge of factors that limit hardwood regeneration and identify actions that lead to restoration and rehabilitation treatments that improve the distribution and condition of hardwood forests in three important hardwood regions of the United States.

Factors to be considered include nursery practices, control of animal browse, fertilization and light availability.

Collaboration image showing 8 to 16 planned publications.
Natural resources/
environmental professionals from three institutions - the University of Hawaii, New Mexico State and Purdue - are collaborating on this project.
Publications, 2-4 for each of the four project objectives are planned.
 
 


Project Director: Dr. Douglass Jacobs
10/01/2017 - 09/30/2022

Print/Research
Impact of McIntire-Stennis project, 66 percent average survival rate of planted hardwoods, three focus hardwood regions, $462,688 five year budget.
 
With increasing population growth there is tremendous pressure on hardwood forests to supply timber, clean water, wildlife habitat and recreation. Plantations will be increasingly relied upon to meet these needs.
Average Survival Rate of operationally planted hardwood in Indiana.
Hardwood regions will be the focus of this project: the Central Hardwood Forest Region, the southeastern Atlantic Coast and Hawaii.
Estimated budget of this five year project.

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