Graduate Program

Who we are 

Food science is an all-encompassing major that is centered on enriching and improving food through increased food safety, novel processing techniques, nutritional benefits, and food functionality. To achieve these goals, Purdue’s Food Science graduate program focuses on four signature areas: Food Chemistry, Structure and Function; Foods for Health; Food Safety and Microbiology; Food Processing and Technology Development. Students from diverse academic backgrounds join the department to conduct research in one of these areas under the mentoring of outstanding faculty members. After earning graduate degrees, they pursue careers in academia, government or industry. Valuable networking opportunities with industry executives along with the department’s placement services often lead to employment with companies such as Cargill, Conagra, General Mills, Hershey's, Kellogg’s, Nestlé and Pespico. We offer M.S., Ph.D. and direct Ph.D. degrees.

Overview

The Food Science Graduate Program at Purdue University is an interdepartmental program, including all 23 of the faculty in the Department of Food Science and 11 select faculty in the following departments: Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Animal Sciences, Nutrition Science.  On average, there are 75 graduate students in the program, equally divided between M.S. and Ph.D. students, and approximately equally divided between U.S. and international students. All graduate students are supported on assistantships (or fellowships).

We have special programs for graduate students, outstanding facilities, award-winning faculty, and very helpful and capable staff. There are many opportunities for networking with companies, government agencies, and other university colleagues. We expect a lot from the students accepted into our program, including taking on leadership opportunities. Many of our graduate students have held leadership positions in national organizations.


 

LEARN MORE About Us

Contact Us

Food Science Graduate Program
gradadmissions@purdue.edu 
745 Agriculture Mall Drive
West Lafayette, IN 47907
(765) 494-8258

PROGRAMS

VISIT

"Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it.”

- Alton Brown, American Celebrity Chef, Author and Actor.

Admission Requirements

Food Science Graduate Program (MS, PhD, and Direct PhD) admission process is handled by the interim Food Science Graduate Admissions Coordinator, Brenda Pickett. She will guide you through the application process as you apply through the Purdue University Graduate School. For more information, use the following links:

For other fellowships offered through the Graduate School, visit their website Overview of Student Funding Resources.​​​​

The GRE requirement is currently waived until December 31, 2022.

Domestic Applicants

  • Undergraduate cumulative grade point average:  3.0 or equivalent required
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE): 
    • Minimum score required:  Verbal 146, Quantitative 144, Analytical 4.0
  • Resume
  • Statement of purpose
  • Diversity essay (Only required for U.S. or permanent resident applicants)
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Unofficial transcripts can be used for application review purposes; Official transcripts required for admission.
  • One copy of B. S. diploma upon admission

International Applicants

  • Undergraduate cumulative grade point average:  3.0 or equivalent required
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE): 
    • Minimum score required:  Verbal 146, Quantitative 144, Analytical 4.0
  • Resume
  • Statement of purpose
  • Diversity essay (Only required for U.S. or permanent resident applicants)
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Unofficial transcripts can be used for application review purposes; Official transcripts required for admission.
  • One copy of B. S. diploma upon admission
  • TOEFL for Non-Native English Speakers:
    • Minimum Internet-Based Test (IBT) Overall Score Required: 80 (with the following minimum section requirements:  Reading: 19, Listening: 14, Speaking: 18, Writing: 18)   
  • TOEFL Essentials for Non-Native English Speakers:
    • Minimum Overall Score Required:  8.0 (with the following minimum section requirements:  Reading: 8.0; Listening 8.0; Speaking: 8.0; Writing: 8.
    • Unofficial Transcripts can be used for application review purposes; Official transcripts required for admission.  Language of instruction and English translation required
    • Note that in addition to required minimum scores for writing, speaking, listening, and reading, the Graduate School also requires a minimum overall score that is higher than the minimums for the four area tests combined. Applicants must meet or exceed each of the five scores (listed above) for admission to the Graduate School. Only official TOEFL scores received directly from Educational Testing Service are acceptable.
  • IELTS (Academic Module): An alternative to the TOEFL, scores of 6.5 or higher will be accepted

  • Unofficial Transcripts can be used for application review purposes; Official transcripts required for admission.  Language of instruction and English translation required

  • Copies of B.S. diploma; one copy should be in the language of instruction and the other in English translation

Additional English Proficiency Requirements information can be found on the Purdue Graduate School website.  

The Graduate School does not accept Duolingo test scores.

Special Requirement​​s for Ph. D. Students

bpcs2000.jpgAll Ph.D. students must serve as a teaching assistant for one semester. This requirement provides students with teaching experience and it assists instructors of Food Science courses. Students whose first language is not English must be certified for oral English proficiency for the Purdue Oral English Proficiency Program before serving as a teaching assistant. The Preliminary Examination for Ph.D. students consists of the preparation and oral defense of an original written research proposal.

All applicants must complete the Graduate School's online application and pay the application fee. Detailed instructions and requirements are available in the application.

 

Graduate Application Process

  • Review Admission Requirements for the Food Science Graduate Program to determine that all minimum requirements are met prior to applying. Please pay close attention to submission deadlines and criteria.

  • If all minimum requirements are met, complete and submit the Electronic Application to Purdue Graduate School.

  • All required documents can be submitted electronically through the online application or sent to the Graduate Program Coordinator at address shown on the Admissions Requirements information page.

  • Once all required documents are received, your application file will be submitted to the Food Science Graduate Committee for review. This process typically takes 2-3 weeks. While your application file is being reviewed by the Graduate Committee, the status of your application will be  "Application Complete".

  • After the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator has received your application file from the Graduate Committee after review, you will receive a letter informing you whether your application file has been forwarded for consideration by the faculty. If your file is forwarded, faculty members are informed that a new prospective graduate student’s file has been uploaded to the Graduate Website to review for possible funding. You will not be offered admission to the Food Science Graduate Program unless a faculty member offers a research assistantship prior to admission deadlines. Applicants are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they have common research interest.

  • If your application file has been approved to be considered for a research assistantship, your status on the Graduate Website will reflect "Awaiting Decision". The application will remain in the awaiting decision status until a faculty member has extended an offer to the applicant.  

  • As faculty members receive funding for research assistantships through grant approval, they will review approved application files on the Graduate Website. The faculty member will contact the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator if they find an applicant they feel has the credentials and research interest they seek for their research area. At this point, either the faculty member or the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator will contact the applicant to discuss the possibility of visiting the Food Science Department.

  • When a faculty member finds a student with whom they feel is a good fit for their research area and lab, typically the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator is asked to prepare an offer letter that will be sent to the applicant.

  • Please note that applications are valid for one full year from the date of submission. If admission is not offered in the session noted on the application, applicants can be considered for additional sessions within the one year period without re-applying. If an applicant does not wish to be considered for additional sessions, please contact the Food Science graduate program coordinator.

     

  • Questions? Please refer to the Food Science Graduate Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and/or the Purdue Graduate School FAQs.

Summer Entry:   April 15 (International/Domestic)

Fall Entry:          July 15  (International/Domestic)

Spring Entry:     November 15 (International)

                          December 15 (Domestic)

What is the English proficiency requirement?

Please refer to Purdue's Graduate School English proficiency webpage.

Am I considered an international student?

If you are not a permanent resident or citizen of the United States, you are classified as an international student. If you are in the process of applying for your green card, and your application has not been approved, you are considered an international student.

I am an international student currently studying in the United States. Do I still have to take the TOEFL or IELTS?

The Graduate School waives the TOEFL for applicants who have received a baccalaureate, graduate, or professional degree from a U.S. institution within the past 36 months (at the time the recommendation for admission is received at the Graduate School.)

Is financial support available to international students?

Although specific fellowship, assistantship, and other award eligibility may vary, funding is generally available for both domestic and international students. More than 70% of Purdue's full-time international graduate students receive some funding by or through the University.

How much is the international student fee?

International students pay a $80 fee each semester to help fund the unique services the University offers to international students, such as immigration regulation advising, cultural/educational programming, SEVIS reporting (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System), and compliance with the United States' government.

Graduate Program ​Coursework Requirements

Students develop and obtain approval (from Major Professor, Advisory Committee, Food Science Graduate Committee, Graduate School) for a Plan of Study, then successfully complete (i.e., minimum GPA of 3.0 on 4.0 scale) coursework in the Plan of Study. Beyond the minimum course requirements (see below), students select additional courses based on their chosen area of specialization. Listings are available of additional courses recommended for the general specializations of Food Chemistry, Food Microbiology, Food Processing, and Foods & Health.

The Food Science Graduate Program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours for a M.S. degree and 90 credit hours for a Ph.D. degree. These total credit hours reflect both coursework and research credit hours combined.

Minimum coursework requirements of all graduate students are as follows:

  • Basic Food Science Course Series 
    • Food Chemistry  FS 550
    • Food Analysis  FS 551
    • Nutritional Sciences  FS 552
    • Food Microbiology  FS 553
    • Food Processing and Packaging  FS 554
  • Case Study Course  FS 555
  • Statistics (M.S. students - STAT 511; Ph.D. students -  STAT 511 or 512, and STAT 514)
  • Responsible Conduct in Research  GRAD 612
  • Seminar  FS 684 
Refer to Purdue University Catalog​ Courses for more details about specific courses.

Basic Food Science Course Series and Case Study Course​

The faculty in the Food Science Graduate Program believe that all students who complete a graduate degree in Food Science, regardless of their background, should know and understand certain basic topics important to Food Science. It also is believed that in preparation for productive careers, graduate students will gain from the experience of working in teams and working on problems that require application of knowledge gained. To meet those needs, the Basic Food Science Course Series and a Case Study Course are required of all M.S. and Ph.D. students. Students are required to pass each course in the Basic Food Science Course Series with a grade of C or above, just as they are for all other courses on their Plan of Study. However, it is possible for incoming graduate students to test out of any one of the Basic Food Science Courses.

Each course in the Basic Food Science Course Series is intended to expose students to selected basic concepts related to the topic of that course, and then give them an opportunity to apply that knowledge. Each course relies in part on independent learning by the student. With some direction by the instructor, students are expected to make use of available resources and seek out needed information. Since the courses move at an accelerated rate, students must spend the time necessary to meet the course objectives. With direction from the instructor, students have to integrate information and apply knowledge gained through vehicles such as a problem, project, or report assigned by the instructor. They also learn to recognize the nature of the problem and suggest possible solutions. While some experience in problem solving and working as teams is gained in these five courses, those skills are the primary focus of the Case Study course.

The intent of the Case Study course is for students to work as teams to solve a problem, drawing on what they learned in the Basic Food Science Course Series, and from their specific areas of expertise. The teams develop solutions to a problem supplied directly by a food company.

Some advantages and unique attributes of the Basic Food Science Course Series and the Case Study Course are as follows:

  1. All students completing the program should have some basic understanding of Food Science
  2. Students meet many of the Food Science faculty (10 are involved in the teaching)
  3. Many faculty get to know all the incoming graduate students
  4. All incoming students get to know each other well from taking the courses together
  5. Students obtain experience in problem solving and in working as a team member
  6. Students are exposed to problems encountered in the food industry.

Funding

Is financial support available?

Yes.  Most students extended admission offers are also offered a research assistantship or fellowship. 

What is a research assistantship?

Assistantships typically involve approximately 20 hours of work per week for a professor. Frequently this entails research or teaching. In return, you receive a tuition waiver and a monthly stipend (i.e., salary).

Is tuition covered by a research assistantship?

Assistantship benefits include tuition waivers which pays all but a nominal portion of tuition.  

How do I apply for a research assistantship?

All applicants are considered for research assistantships when they complete the application for admission. Self-funding is an option in the Food Science Graduate Program but applicants must submit a proof of funding (preferably bank statement) to support at least 2 years of MS or 3 years of PhD study. 

What is a fellowship?

Fellowships are similar to undergraduate scholarships. They are typically awarded by a competition and generally do not require work in return for the award. Fellowships provide tuition scholarships and stipends, along with a supplement for purchasing medical insurance.

Fellowships may be obtained from your academic department or program, the Graduate School, or an outside entity, such as a government agency or philanthropic foundation. Fellowships are typically awarded to the most competitive applicants. A program will typically consider you for available fellowships when you apply for admission; however, some fellowships may require the completion of a separate application. Selection criteria and processes will vary.

Is tuition covered by a fellowship?

Fellowships generally include tuition scholarships. Tuition waivers and scholarships are in addition to the monthly stipend and other benefits.

How do I apply for a fellowship?

The Food Science Graduate Committee identifies and nominates the most competitive applicants to be considered for Purdue University fellowships.  To be considered for these fellowships, you must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident and graduated from a U.S. high school.  

To be considered for fellowships offered by the Graduate School, you must be admitted to Purdue. The following link Overview of Student Funding Resources provides information regarding specific Graduate School fellowships, including the application process and requirements.

Current Purdue University undergradate students seeking to continue to a MS or PhD program, please consider applying the the Charles C. Chappelle Fellowship.  This is a student direct apply fellowship.  You can find application criteria and deadline information by clicking the Charles C. Chappelle Fellowship link.  

For more information on Recruitment Fellowships such as the ARGE Diversity, Lynn, Ross and USDA National Needs in Food Science and Gut Health Fellowships, click the respective link.

​​​​​​Support for our Graduate Program comes in numerous forms. Naturally, government and research grants support student assistantships as well as competitive assistantships offered internally within Purdue University. However, funds for graduate students also are needed for supplementing these assistantships, travel to professional meetings, awards, and special programs.

The Department of Food Science has several endowments that support programs, directly or indirectly, for our graduate students.These endowments provide indefinite annual spending income of over $18,000 per year, helping support our programs and providing flexibility.

Like all endowments, people can add to them as they wish. To make a donation, please contact the Agriculture Advancement Office at 765-494-8672.

 

Allen Kirleis Graduate Award

The Allen Kirleis Graduate Award was established in 1995 to award financial awards based on academic achievements to one or more graduate students in the Department of Food Sciences in the School of Agriculture who are preparing to attend or make presentations at national scientific meeting(s). If the award cannot be granted to a deserving student, it may be used for support for a guest lecturer in the Department in Food Sciences. Selection for this award shall be made by the Dean of the School of Agriculture upon recommendation from the head of the Department of Food Sciences in consultation with a faculty committee appointed by the Department Head.

 

B.J. Liska Graduate Scholarship

The B.J. Liska Graduate Scholarship was established in 2003 to attract and retain exceptional Food Science graduate students. The Head of the Department of Food Science or the Head's designee will select the recipient(s) and determine the amount of the scholarship(s), all with the approval of the Dean of the School of Agriculture. In selecting recipients for these scholarships based on academic excellence, the Head or designee may consider not only a candidate's grade point average but also his/her participation in extracurricular activities and potential to be an outstanding food scientist. Income also may be used to provide a plaque, located in the Department, listing each recipient. The University's Division of Financial Aid will administer the scholarships provided for in this Agreement.

 

B.J. Liska Graduate Teaching Award

The Bernie J. a Outstanding Graduate Student Teaching Award was first awarded in 1999. The awarded was created by Dr. Bernie Liska, former Dean of Purdue’s College of Agriculture and Fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists, to recognize graduate students who excelled in teaching. He cherished the opportunity to recognize students’ work as he felt it created drive towards excellence.

Upon Dr. Liska’s death, gifts in his memory, including those of his daughters, Julie Liska-Esperson (FS ’92) and Cheryl Colman, established an endowment, ensuring that his memory and his wishes continue in perpetuity. Today, the endowment supports one teaching award each semester. An "in-perpetuity plaque" lists the names of all of the recipients, and a plaque and a financial award are presented to the student recipients.

 

Bill and Margie Stadelman Endowment for the Graduate Program

The Bill and Margie Stadelman Support Fund for the Graduate Program was endowed through a gift by the Stadelman’s. The goal of the Stadelmans was to create a pool of funds that is spent to enhance the graduate program in the department. These funds will allow students to travel to meetings, provide graduate scholarships, and continue to build the academic quality of the graduate program.

Dr. Bill Stadelman, founding inductee of the International Poultry Hall of Fame, believes these funds should be used to bring the best students into the Purdue Food Science Graduate Program. "I was lucky to always have grants that let me send students to meetings. This helped me attract the top quality students that I always had in my labs. I have received a lot of honors and it is, in no small part, due to my students."

Philip E. Nelson Endowment for Excellence

Purdue Food Science continues to hold to the philosophy of moving forward. In keeping with that, the Department is pleased to announce an unrestricted endowment in the name of Dr. Phil Nelson.

The interest funds from the endowment are to be spent to pursue the Department’s vision, "to be recognized world-wide as the leading food science department." This vision was articulated by Dr. Nelson when the department was founded in 1983. 

Dr. Marion Williams, Dr. Nelson’s first graduate student, founded the endowment with a multi-year pledge. "My intention is to create an endowment providing ongoing income to the Food Science Department to foster Phil Nelson’s vision of excellence", said Dr. Williams. Numerous people have stepped up to add to the endowment. There is already over $100,000 in pledges.

Gifts will continually be accepted. For further information regarding how to give to this endowment, please contact the Agricultural Advancement Office​ 765-494-8672. 

Suzanne Nielsen Endowment for Student Support

Faculty and Facilities

Purdue Food Science faculty conduct research in four major areas within the food science discipline

  1.  Food Chemistry, Structure and Function
  2.  Foods for Health
  3.  Food Safety and Microbiology
  4.  Food Processing and Technology Development

Some faculty conduct research in several of these signature research areas. For more details and a list of faculty per signature research area, please view our Signature Research webpage

Each faculty member has a web directory profile page that includes contact information, his/her CV,  awards, select publications, and more. Please go to our faculty directory to view.

Food Science Facilities

Philip E. Nelson Hall of Food Science is abbreviated NLSN

Food Science Teaching Facilities​

Food Science Research Labs & Facilities

  • Bio-analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Bioluminescence
  • Biopolymer
  • Bioprocessing
  • Brewery
  • Cereal Chemistry
  • Cereal Milling
  • Cereal Molecular
  • Cereal Processing
  • Chemical Analysis
  • Deliquescence & Shelf Life
  • Enology
  • Extraction & Encapsulation
  • Food Carbohydrate
  • Food Microbiology
  • Food Safety
  • Functional Genomics
  • Interfacial Engineering
  • Infrared Spectroscopy
  • Microbiology Instrumentation
  • Molecular Food Microbiology
  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
  • Phytochemistry & Bioavailability
  • Pilot-Scale Manufacturing Laboratory
  • Processed Food Quality
  • Protein Chemistry
  • Rheology
  • Sensors & Controls
  • Sensory Evaluation
  • Starch & Food Gums
  • Structural Biology
  • Transport Phenomena
  • Winery

Careers & Internships & Jobs

Career IN Food Science

What is Food Science?

Have you ever wondered about the processes involved to transform raw commodities to the food on your table? That's what food science is all about. Food scientists use principles from biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and engineering to convert agricultural commodities into edible foods and beverages.

As the largest industry in the United States, food processing employs nearly 2 million people and accounts for more than 16 percent of the country's gross national product. Consumers drive the industry as they seek healthy, convenient, and affordable foods and beverages to purchase. As the industry strives to meet consumers demands, the job market for trained food scientists grows. Agriculture, food and its related industries provide 11% of U.S. employment. Food Manufacturing accounts for 14% of all U.S. manufacturing employees. Purdue's Department of Food Science is recognized word-wide for training food scientists from around the globe.

 Types of Jobs for Food Scientists

Most students who graduate from our program work in the food and beverage industry in the areas of  food safety, food regulations, quality assurance, product development, ingredient procurement, food security, research, sales, sensory evaluation, and technical services. Some choose related areas such as food entrepreneurship, food communications, advertising, consumer education and protection, academia, and culinary research. Our undergraduate program can also prepare students to pursue graduate studies, medical school, veterinary school, or law school.

Other resource to learn more about food science and careers in food science are:

Average Beginning Salary for Food Scientists

The average starting salary for students who earn a bachelor's degree from Purdue Food Science program is ~$53,000. Geographic location of jobs does make a difference in salary offers.

There are several online resources that can be helpful to research salary information such as:

Salary Expert​ (includes global cost of living comparisons)

Salary.com

LinkedIn Salary

MoneyGeek's Cost of Living Calculator

PayScale

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics​ (Food Science falls in the Life, Physical and Social Science category)

 

Placement and Jobs for Purdue Food Science Students

Students can seek employment by using the resources within the Department of Food Science, the College of Agriculture, and/or the University. Food Science continues to have 100% job placement for our graduates who are actively seeking employment. 

Food Science Department Placement

The Food Science Career Services & External Relations Coordinator, coordinates recruiting visits to the Department for companies. She also teaches and advises students on networking, résumés, cover letters, interviewing skills, understanding and negotiating offers, and other professional skills.

College of Agriculture Career Office

The College of Agriculture employs career services staff, who maintain a web site with position openings posted. They also coordinate the fall and spring career fairs hosted by the College.

Purdue University Career Services

The Center for Career Opportunities (CCO) is a resource for all Purdue students and alumni. Students can register with CCO to access their job posting site. Employers should contact CCO to post jobs on their site.

The Purdue Engineering Student Council hosts one of the largest student-run career fairs in the nation every year, usually in early September, called Industrial Roundtable (IR). This two-day career fair attracts over 400 companies and is open to all Purdue students.  

Employment Data of Food Science

The average beginning salary for bachelor's degree (B.S.) food science graduates is ~$53,000. For more details, refer to: 

Purdue's Center for Career Opportunities Data Dashboard for the College of Agriculture

Companies Hiring Food Scientists

Check out a sample list of companies that hire food scientists, including many graduates from our program.

  • Aldi
  • Amcor Packaging
  • Ameriqual
  • Argana Fruit
  • Aunt Millie's Bakeries
  • Boar's Head
  • Cargill
  • Clasen Quality Coatings
  • Coca Cola
  • ConAgra Foods
  • Continental Mills
  • Dannon
  • Dow AgroSciences
  • DuPont Nutrition
  • Diageo
  • Ed Miniat
  • E&J Gallo
  • Foxtail Foods
  • General Mills
  • Griffith Laboratories
  • Heartland Food Products Group
  • Hershey's
  • Hormel
  • Ingredion
  • Kalsec
  • Kellogg's
  • Kerry Flavors and Ingredients
  • KraftHeinz
  • Kroger
  • Land O'Frost
  • Land O'Lakes
  • Leprino
  • Litehouse Foods
  • Maplehurst Bakeries
  • Maple Leaf Farms
  • M&M Mars
  • Morgan Foods
  • Nestle
  • Newly Weds Foods
  • PepsiCo
  • PT Dinaco Grasia
  • Red Gold
  • Reinhart Food Service
  • Safeway
  • Sensient
  • Skjodt Barrett
  • Starbucks
  • Trilliant Food & Nutrition
  • Tyson
  • U.S. Foods
  • Van Drunen Farms
  • Vivolac Cultures
  • Zentis

 

Career Advising Resources

Department Level

The Department of Food Science has a dedicated career services coordinator staff person. The career services coordinator also serves as the Department's industry and alumni relations coordinator so she is continual contact with professionals in the industry and teaches three required courses, AGR 118, FS 298, and FS 482  that teach students professional skills such as resumes, cover letters, interviewing, and networking skills, career options,  and "adulting" topics such as budgets and understanding job offers and benefits. Outside of the classroom, the career services coordinator is available to meet with students one-on-one.

College Level

The College of Agriculture Office of Academic Programs employs career resource staff who coordinate two careers fairs each year.

University Level

Purdue University's Center for Career Opportunties (CCO) staff can also assist students with resumes and cover letters. The CCO posts job opportunities, publishes the CCO career success handbook resource, offers interviewing practice, and more!

CCO

Ag Career office

Special Programs for Graduate Students

In the Spring of each year, Ph.D. students have the opportunity to participate in the Applied Management Principles (AMP) Program in the Krannert School of Management.  This program is affectionately referred to as the ‘mini-MBA program’.

 There are 2 sessions available annually (May and August).

Program Overview

  • AMP is hosted by Purdue’s Krannert School of Management – Executive Education Programs – a leader in management education.
  • Provides 40 hours of interactive learning on key management topics that useful to your future career.
  • Topics include: finance, marketing, accounting, strategy, business law, negotiations and more.
  • Monday-Friday. Classes meet from 8:00 AM-4:00 PM, with extra sessions after 4:00 PM some days. Assignments are not graded, and there are no quizzes or exams.
  • All classes are held at the Krannert Center for Executive Education (KCTR) at Purdue.

Cost  

  • The 2021 program fee for Purdue PhD students is about $1,895.00, which includes program instruction and materials, and daily breakfast and lunch for networking.  

ARGE Support

  • ARGE Graduate Programs will provide $950 assistance per student (a limit of 5 students supported from the CoA) to attend this program.  The balance ($945) must be provided by the student, PI or department.  Interested students are encouraged to request support from their department head, Graduate Advisor,  and/or Graduate Chair for the balance of funds for the program.

Application

To apply for the spring or fall session (and be considered for the $950 in ARGE funds to support attendance) the nomination materials shown below will be uploaded by the graduate chair via Qualtrics.

  1. A letter stating how you would use the AMP training to advance your career goals
  2. A letter of support from your advisor acknowledging your potential participation in the program
  3. Source of balance of funds ($945) for the program (i.e. Departmental funds, Student personal funds, etc.)
  4. Student CV (3 pages max)  

There are a limited number of seats.  Eligible candidates from the College will be rank-ordered for further consideration.  Successful nominees will be notified of their acceptance in April for either the spring or fall session.  Students not seeking ARGE support are encouraged to apply directly to the program.

 

The Department of Food Science at Purdue University began a Graduate Student Leadership and Professional Development Seminar Series in the Spring of 2005, which currently is supported in part by General Mills, Inc. This seminar series is offered during the spring semester. Graduate students in the Food Science Graduate Program are invited to participate in the seminar series once during their graduate program at Purdue University. Students generally are encouraged to participate during their second or third semester for M.S. students, or during their fourth or fifth semester for Ph.D. students. There are no costs for the students to participate in this seminar series. The following is a sample list of topics/books covered in recent years:

  • Myers-Briggs Exam and Interpretation
  • "How to Win Friends and Influence People"
  • "Developing the Leader Within You"
  • Resumes, Interviewing, Job Search Tools
  • Professional Development
  • Networking
  • Career Paths
  • Professional Ethics
  • Dining Etiquette

Campus Life and Extracurriculars

Purdue

At Purdue, your opportunities for learning, involvement, and fun extend far beyond the classroom walls. At a campus with students from all 50 states and 130 countries, you will enjoy getting to know people with many different perspectives, backgrounds, and philosophies. More than 1,000 student organizations present myriad ways to find friends, develop new skills, and serve others. The residence halls, which accommodate 85 percent of the first-year class, are like neighborhoods — a great place to get to know people. Big Ten sports fuel school spirit. 

Get involved in the campus community, and you will quickly discover that extracurricular activities are an unforgettable part of the Purdue experience. 

Extracurriculars

With more than 1,000 student organizations at Purdue, students and members of the University community enjoy infinite opportunities to build friendships and rewarding experiences through co-curricular involvement in student organizations.  Getting involved at Purdue shrinks the University to... well, almost... the size of the campus model in the Purdue Memorial Union! Check out the Purdue University Student Organizations Boilerlink website.

Housing

Where you choose to live plays an integral role in your college experience. Purdue University Residences provide an environment that will make you feel right at home and, at the same time, right in the middle of campus offer a wide variety of housing choices, dining options, and activities.

Division of Recreational Sports also known as the "Co-Rec"

The France A. Cordova Recreational Sports Center was the first university building in the United States created solely to serve students' recreational sports needs. It also is the administrative center for all programs coordinated by the Division of Recreational Sports

Co-Rec web site

Combines with the Food Science Club, Food Science Graduate Association (FSGSA) is a chapter of the national Institute of Food Technologists Student Association (IFTSA). Club members have the opportunity to compete in the Institute of Food Technologists Student Association (IFTSA) College Bowl competition and IFTSA Product Development competitions.

The Food Science Graduate Student Association (FSGSA) represents the voice of the graduate students in the Food Science Graduate Program at Purdue University. FSGSA provides opportunities for students to discuss current issues, work with the faculty to improve the graduate program, and socialize and enjoy time together outside of research and academia.

FSGSA was founded in September 2000 by Kristen Gray who had a vision for what the graduate students could accomplish by uniting together. Gray wanted to increase communication and interaction amongst fellow graduate students as well as between the graduate students and the department. Many of her ideas have taken form to help develop the organization as it is known today. One such activity is our Continuing Lecture Series, where faculty members present ongoing research taking place in their laboratory and discuss resources that they can provide to other students in the department.

Many social activities are also organized by the FSGSA to allow students a chance to relax and have fun away from the rigors of research. Ice skating, bowling, and monthly breakfasts have been among these events. The group also promotes “Purdue Pride” by giving away prizes to those demonstrating their knowledge of Purdue trivia. Annually, the FSGSA sponsors the International Dinner. Students as well as faculty and staff are invited to bring a dish native to their homeland to share.

While the FSGSA has made many strides to promoting the well being of graduate students, the organization hopes to make even more progress in the future. The group hopes to continue with all of the current activities it hosts as well as promote more activities to enhance the lives of food science graduate students at Purdue University. ​

Phi Tau Sigma Honor Society for Food Science

The Mission of Phi Tau Sigma

The mission of Phi Tau Sigma is to raise the stature and recognize scholarly achievements of the Food Science and Technology profession. This mission is achieved by encouraging outstanding achievement by Food Science students and professionals, and by enhancing professionals among Food Science professionals through the Phi Tau Sigma member network.

Purposes of Phi Tau Sigma

  • To recognize and honor professional achievements of Food Scientists and Technologists,
  • To encourage the application of fundamental scientific principles to Food Science and Technology in each of its branches,
  • To stimulate the exchange of scientific knowledge through meetings, lectures, and publications,
  • To establish and maintain a network of like-minded professionals, and
  • To promote exclusively charitable, scientific, literary and educational programs.

For additional information on Phi Tau Sigma Honor Society including Membership, Awards and Donor/Sponsorship, please visit their website

Frequently Asked Questions

It is difficult to predict how likely you are to be admitted to the Food Science Graduate Program at Purdue University. Many factors impact admission decisions, such as the qualifications of other applicants, the number of new students that can be accommodated, and the number of professors that share your research and scholarly interests. Each application is given careful consideration and a holistic approach to the admissions process is generally employed by the graduate admissions committee. All components of the application package, including the application, letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, academic record (i.e., transcripts), test scores, resume/curriculum vitae (CV), research experience, publications, and other items required are considered.

Yes. 

In general, it is suggested that you apply early in your senior year of college, which is usually nine to 12 months prior to when you want to begin graduate studies. Applying early has its advantages: more funding opportunities are typically available, and more spaces may be available for admission.

If a completed application has been submitted (i.e., you have completed and submitted the Graduate School's application, paid the application fee, and submitted letters of recommendation, official transcripts, test scores, and any other items required), no additional action is required.  After your application file has been reviewed by the Food Science Graduate Review Committee, you will be notified of the committee’s decision of “acceptable” or “unacceptable” to be considered for available funding.  This process typically take 2-3 weeks.

Graduate Application Process

  • Review Admission Requirements for the Food Science Graduate Program to determine that all minimum requirements are met prior to applying. Please pay close attention to submission deadlines and criteria.

  • If all minimum requirements are met, complete and submit the Electronic Application to Purdue Graduate School.

  • All required documents can be submitted electronically through the online application or sent to the Graduate Program Coordinator at address shown on the Admissions Requirements information page.

  • Once all required documents are received, your application file will be submitted to the Food Science Graduate Committee for review. This process typically takes 2-3 weeks. While your application file is being reviewed by the Graduate Committee, the status of your application will be  "Application Complete".

  • After the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator has received your application file from the Graduate Committee after review, you will receive a letter informing you whether your application file has been forwarded for consideration by the faculty. If your file is forwarded, faculty members are informed that a new prospective graduate student’s file has been uploaded to the Graduate Website to review for possible funding. You will not be offered admission to the Food Science Graduate Program unless a faculty member offers a research assistantship prior to admission deadlines. Applicants are encouraged to contact faculty members with whom they have common research interest.

  • If your application file has been approved to be considered for a research assistantship, your status on the Graduate Website will reflect "Awaiting Decision". The application will remain in the awaiting decision status until a faculty member has extended an offer to the applicant.  

  • As faculty members receive funding for research assistantships through grant approval, they will review approved application files on the Graduate Website. The faculty member will contact the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator if they find an applicant they feel has the credentials and research interest they seek for their research area. At this point, either the faculty member or the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator will contact the applicant to discuss the possibility of visiting the Food Science Department.

  • When a faculty member finds a student with whom they feel is a good fit for their research area and lab, typically the Food Science Graduate Program Coordinator is asked to prepare an offer letter that will be sent to the applicant.

  • Please note that applications are valid for one full year from the date of submission. If admission is not offered in the session noted on the application, applicants can be considered for additional sessions within the one year period without re-applying. If an applicant does not wish to be considered for additional sessions, please contact the food science department graduate program coordinator.

     

  • Questions? Please refer to the Food Science Graduate Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and/or the Purdue Graduate School FAQs.

Typically the Food Science Graduate Program has about 75 graduate students each year. 

Please contact the Food Science graduate program coordinator to inquire about visitation opportunities.  All campus visits are done on an individual basis to provide more individualized attention to each applicant. 

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